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Lynda Loveland: Sneaky kids learning the ropes

Kids learn at a very early age to not quite tell the truth. I really believe it’s something we’re born with. It sure seems like it comes naturally.

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Lynda Loveland
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Lynda Loveland

Kids learn at a very early age to not quite tell the truth. I really believe it’s something we’re born with. It sure seems like it comes naturally.

Sneaking around, on the other hand, takes some perfecting. My three-year-old daughter Carys has been getting a lot of practice.

I say goodnight to my kids in order of their age. Carys first, then Caiden and finally Campbell. Lately, while in Caiden’s room, having already said goodnight to Carys, she is starting to sneak out of her room and roam. She is, of course, supposed to stay in her room.

At first, she would make too much noise shutting the door and blow her cover. I’d yell from Caiden’s room for her to go back to bed. It became a game of cat and mouse. She started closing her door more gently and quietly. I could still hear a faint click until recently.

The other day, while in Caiden’s room, I thought, "Wow, Carys actually stayed in her room tonight." I walked out of Caiden’s room and when I walked by Carys’ room I noticed something odd.

I called out to Carys, “Honey, did you come out of your room?” She said, “No, mommy.”

I said, “Are you in bed?” She said, “Yes, mommy.”

I said, “Really. That’s strange, because half your nightgown is hanging out your door!”

I grabbed her nightgown, opened the door and there she was ... busted! She didn’t know whether to laugh or cry. She looked like she could burst into tears. But I couldn’t help it and gave her a big smile, scooped her up and put her to bed. (In her bed this time. J)

Lynda is the mom of three and co-host of Mix 101.5 WRAL-FM's Bill & Lynda in the Morning. Find her here on Go Ask Mom every Thursday.
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