Local News

New hunting rules in effect in N.C.

Posted August 1, 2010

— Hunters in North Carolina can bow hunt on Sundays on private lands as new hunting rules are in effect.

In all, 15 hunting and trapping rules were approved by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission in March 2009. The new rules that went into effect Sunday include:

  • Require hunters harvesting deer through the Deer Management Assistance Program (DMAP) to use tags and report their harvests, whether those deer are antlerless or antlered. Allow harvest of deer on DMAP areas under the big game harvest report card and the bonus antlerless deer harvest report card, where applicable.
  • Change the description of where bonus antlerless deer harvest report cards may be used from “private lands” to “lands other than those enrolled in the Game Land Program” in order to permit the use of these cards on military installations, national wildlife refuges, and other public lands that are not game lands.
  • Remove the daily bag limit for deer.
  • Allow hunters to use archery equipment to harvest deer during the muzzleloading firearms season on game lands.
  • Shorten the bow season by one week and open the muzzleloader season one week earlier to create a two week muzzleloader season.
  • Deer seasons in the northwestern deer season will be changed so that the regular gun season is extended through January 1. Deer seasons in the eastern, central and western deer season structures will remain unchanged.
  • Deer seasons on game lands in the northwestern deer season will be changed so that the regular gun season is extended through January 1. Deer seasons on game lands in the eastern, central and western deer season structures will remain unchanged.
  • Open all private lands in the eastern, central and northwestern deer seasons to the maximum either-sex deer season.
  • Assign all of Moore County to the eastern deer season.
  • Allow falconry on Sundays, except for migratory game birds.
  • Allow the use of crossbows anytime bow and arrows are legal weapons.
  • Allow bow hunting on Sundays on private lands only, except for migratory game birds.
  • Disallow the selling of live foxes and coyotes taken under a depredation permit to controlled hunting preserves.
  • Allow a landowner with a valid depredation permit to give away the edible portions of deer to anyone. Require the recipient to retain a copy of the depredation permit.
  • Eliminate the requirement that a landholder must get a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service permit for the taking of nuisance migratory birds before getting a Commission depredation permit to do so.
34 Comments

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  • Bendal1 Aug 3, 8:46 a.m.

    lifeisajourney,

    Yes, there are studies that indicate that the deer population is growing. Pennsylvania has a deer overpopulation mainly because of lack of predators and restrictive hunting. As I said, go talk to residents in Biltmore Forest and ask about the deer population there.

    As for hunters being altruistic towards deer, don't put words in my mouth. The ones I know want to insure the deer population stays in good shape; no diseased or malnourished animals, both which are more common with overpopulated areas. It's for the hunter's benefit, of course, but so what? Every day you eat meat, someone killed an animal for you. Do you feel regret then too, or are you a strict vegetarian (no fish either)?

    Deer have no natural predators now. They overpopulate areas with no natural predators and no hunting. Those are facts. Do some research please.

  • fishon Aug 2, 4:35 p.m.

    I will still ride my horses on Sunday. I am packing to. Might be some shoot outs in the woods. I only have one day to ride my horses in hunting season. I will keep that day. Regardless. Bring your guns... I will bring mine as well.

    What part of bowhunting only on private land only didn't you understand?

  • LifeisaJourney Aug 2, 3:27 p.m.

    keo-nc - "Don't try to bother this person with facts. It's not going to matter.."

    Ahh, leo-nc, the irony in your statement is overwhelming.

    May I offer the observation that someone's disagreement with another person's beliefs makes neither person wrong.

    I would again like to point out that my main assertion is that hunters enjoy hurting and killing animals. If they didn't enjoy it, they wouldn't do it. And this isn't meant as a criticism at all. It just is what it is. And this isn't meant as a criticism either, but I am truly curious as to why hunters just won't come out and say it. Why all the defensiveness?

  • LifeisaJourney Aug 2, 3:14 p.m.

    thduece07 - "very people you pretend to hate" and "You hate what you don't understand" Please re-read my posts. I've never said that I hate anyone. I've never even criticized hunters or spoken ill of hunters. Can you please tell me where you read this into my words?

    "You hate what you don't understand" And I perfectly understand the hunting tradition. I grew up next to a large hunting preserve in eastern NC. I have family members who hunt. And I've also stated that I grew up on a farm where we slaughtered our own animals for food. But, granted, you are correct in that I don't understand how people can enjoy hurting and killing animals.

  • LifeisaJourney Aug 2, 3:01 p.m.

    Bendal1 - "Hunting is necessary to reduce the number of deer in this state" Let's examine this common excuse first.

    First let's examine the premise. That the deer population needs to be reduced. Do we have non-biased. scientific evidence that this is true? Or is it just something that some people believe is true? Perhaps the human population of our state needs to be reduced or managed. No, I'm not suggesting a solution along the lines of Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal", just that we need to re-examine the issues our own uncontrolled sprawl is creating. Perhaps we should address the source of the problem, not the symptoms.

    Secondly, do hunters truly have altruistic reasons for killing animals? Is the reason they hunt to make a better life for the remainin animals. I have killed animals that I have found suffering and dying. Including a deer that was wounded by an arrow. I certainly took no pleasure in it and it isn't an activity that I seek out.

  • leo-nc Aug 2, 1:30 p.m.

    "You are so, so wrong. Just because someone may not hunt themselves doesn't mean they don't support hunting. You know what happens in areas where hunting isn't allowed (like Biltmore Forest)? The deer overpopulate, eat people's crops and vegetation, endanger motorists and eventually starve in large numbers. Hunting is necessary to reduce the number of deer in this state, since there's few natural predators left to keep their numbers manageable."----

    Don't try to bother this person with facts. It's not going to matter..

  • itsnotmeiswear Aug 2, 1:18 p.m.

    thdeuce07-well said. I had a good year hunting last year and filled my freezer, but I pass on and watch way more deer than I kill. The times I remember the most from last year had nothing to do with killing. It was spending time with my best friend's son, playing peek-a boo with a raccoon in a tree from three feet away, and watching a bobcat family play in a creek.

  • thdeuce07 Aug 2, 1:02 p.m.

    The thing that you must relize is that the reason this land (publice land) even exists is due to the fees that hunters and fishermen pay. All this land you take as yours was purchased and maintained by money from the very people you pretend to hate. It sounds allot like racism to me only directed at hunting and not a race. You hate what you don't understand. Every thing you eat was killed or killed life in some form to produce. How many millions of bugs and small ground animals are killed to till and plant that whole grain bread or salad you're eating?

    I enjoy the outdoors and hunting. Not a moment goes by in the tree stand that I don't marvel at the works of our creator around me. I stand in awe of the mighty works.

    I completely respect the animals I hunt. I don't kill what I wont eat.

    And again as was previously said this is on private land only.

  • Bendal1 Aug 2, 12:37 p.m.

    lifeisajourney,

    You are so, so wrong. Just because someone may not hunt themselves doesn't mean they don't support hunting. You know what happens in areas where hunting isn't allowed (like Biltmore Forest)? The deer overpopulate, eat people's crops and vegetation, endanger motorists and eventually starve in large numbers. Hunting is necessary to reduce the number of deer in this state, since there's few natural predators left to keep their numbers manageable.

  • LifeisaJourney Aug 2, 12:34 p.m.

    bdawg - No, I don't eat meat. I grew up on a farm where we slaughtered our own animals for food. I decided at a very young age that I wanted nothing to do with meat.

    But, really eating meat has very little to do with hunting.

    leo nc - "Take your bleeding heart to NYC ok?" Huh? Why should I? And why, may I ask, would you even say that? Are you implying that I have a conscience and want to treat animals humanely and therefore I should move to a large urban area. Well, why? That makes no sense to me. Or are you perhaps implying that NC should solely be populated by hard-hearted, reason-impaired folks who live in rural areas? That really makes no sense to me either. Eithe way, my family has lived in NC since the colonial period and we have the land grants to prove it; I'm not going anywhere.

    And I should say that I spoke no criticism. I just said that "hunters" enjoy hurting and killing animals. It's the plain truth. No one should feel defensive about it.

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