Local News

Loud music in downtown Raleigh leads to permit process study

Posted November 19, 2013

— The City Council wants more time to figure out how to create better relations between downtown Raleigh residents and city night spots.

As more people and businesses have moved downtown, the number of complaints about late-night noise has increased. But both business owners and residents say the city's requirement of a public hearing before granting an amplified entertainment permit is too cumbersome.

The Downtown Raleigh Alliance plans to work with residents and business owners, as well as police, to come up with a solution.

The City Council voted Tuesday to wait 90 days to get feedback from the group before making any changes to the permitting process.

33 Comments

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  • RocknRollDoctor Nov 21, 10:08 a.m.

    Stop building low rise housing in downtown. Residential units need to be higher off the street.

  • bill0 Nov 21, 9:14 a.m.

    "The bars were there before you. Deal with it or move."

    For many residents, that is absolutely NOT true. If you've lived downtown for more than 10 years, you were likely there before any bars arrived. Downtown was a ghost town after 5.

  • Billy the Kid Nov 20, 5:00 p.m.

    The bars were there before you. Deal with it or move.

  • tomsimon13 Nov 20, 4:18 p.m.

    Come on folks. If you want quiet, there are plenty of sprawling communities outside of Downtown Raleigh that you can choose to live in. I live downtown, and have lived in urban environments for years, and accept is as part of a choice to be there. People will open and close doors to bars/clubs because they can only smoke outside, and that's not going to change. Bars will get more and more crowded as we continue to develop housing and most likely so will the number of nights that the noise level is turned up. For now it's primarily isolated to weekends, but add a 22 story building, Citrix and a number of other housing projects around the area, and that won't last much longer.

  • cecil822 Nov 20, 4:04 p.m.

    You all wanted the "Big City" feel. Well, there you go.

  • FairPlay Nov 20, 3:08 p.m.

    As someone who lived in downtown Chicago noise is part of life there as it is in any city. I find it funny that residents are complaining. Don't like it, just move. Cities are noisy. Raleigh will never achieve true city status it seems. Nightlife downtown is vital to it.

  • redapace Nov 20, 2:00 p.m.

    "As someone who lives downtown, I'd say that 99% of the time, businesses/events are pretty considerate of their neighbors. Occasionally, some will make bad decisions - like opening up doors/walls etc at midnight while the bands are playing. We need a simple process for dealing with those few bad actors while not imposing major restrictions on the vast majority of businesses that are already being considerate of their neighbors."

    BillO - if the bars are told they have to turn down the music to a level that people down the street can't hear, that would kill their business. Just like their businesses were killed when they were told they could'nt have people smoking cigarettes inside.

    But seriously, on the contrary, they may find that it works in the opposite way. Just as many people dont want to go somewhere and breathe cigarette smoke, many would prefer being able to carry on a conversation with the person next to them without having to scream in their ear.

  • sc2005 Nov 20, 1:45 p.m.

    I do think that it's ridiculous for folks to move downtown and then complain about the noise, just as it's inane for people to move to the country, then complain about the smell and commute. Foolish folks are just that-not constrained by political affiliation or ancestry. I'm not sure why everything here is reduced to that-

  • ILoveDowntownRaleigh Nov 20, 1:43 p.m.

    The City Council's plan to collect feedback from all parties before taking action makes perfect sense.

    And I agree with dwntwnboy2 that a growing urban environment will inevitably bring more noise.

    Not everyone considers that a bad thing. I am reminded of a character in a movie who had to take a trip from his home in NYC to a small town. To sleep at night, he put on headphones with a recording of city sounds, sirens, etc.

    Everything in life involves trade-offs. When I consider the alternatives, I love the city life.

  • bill0 Nov 20, 1:26 p.m.

    I really don't understand the weird, bitter comments. There is an occasional noise issue. Neither the businesses nor residents like the current process, so they are sitting down together to figure out some common sense rules. What on earth is wrong with that? That is how local government is supposed to work.

    As someone who lives downtown, I'd say that 99% of the time, businesses/events are pretty considerate of their neighbors. Occasionally, some will make bad decisions - like opening up doors/walls etc at midnight while the bands are playing. We need a simple process for dealing with those few bad actors while not imposing major restrictions on the vast majority of businesses that are already being considerate of their neighbors.

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