Political News

President Trump's other insensitive comments on race, ethnicity

Posted January 11, 2018 6:19 p.m. EST

— President Donald Trump's comments Thursday decrying the migration of citizens from "shithole countries" was criticized as racially insensitive.

Trump, according to sources, was referring to Haiti and African nations. Here are other instances when Trump said things many considered to be disparaging to ethnic and racial groups.

Latinos

During a June 2015 speech announcing his candidacy, Trump referred to some Mexican immigrants as "rapists."

"When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best. ... They're sending people that have lots of problems, and they're bringing those problems with us. They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume, are good people," Trump said.

Two days after becoming the presumptive Republican nominee in 2016, Trump tweeted a picture of himself enjoying a taco bowl on Cinco De Mayo, a Mexican holiday.

The tweet read: "Happy #CincoDeMayo! The best taco bowls are made in Trump Tower Grill. I love Hispanics!"

African-Americans

In an attempt to tout his support among African-Americans, the then-presidential candidate pointed to a black man in a crowd at June 2016 rally in California, calling him "my African-American."

"Oh, look at my African-American over here. Look at him," Trump said. "Are you the greatest?"

Gregory Cheadle, then a GOP California congressional candidate, said he was the supporter to whom Trump pointed. Cheadle said the comment didn't offend him.

The President's remark in 2016 came as he recalled an incident earlier that year when a black supporter of his assaulted a protester at an Arizona rally as he was being escorted out of the building by police.

During an August 2016 campaign stop, Trump argued that African-Americans have been struggling and taken for granted by the Democratic Party, and should consider voting for him in the November general election.

"You're living in poverty, your schools are no good, you have no jobs, 58% of your youth is unemployed -- what the hell do you have to lose?" Trump told a crowd in Michigan.

Native Americans

During a November 2017 event at the White House honoring World War II Navajo Code Talkers, Trump referred to Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren by his nickname for her -- Pocahontas.

"I just want to thank you because you are very, very special people. You were here long before any of us were here," Trump said. "Although, we have a representative in Congress who has been here a long time ... longer than you -- they call her Pocahontas!"

The President then turned to the Code Talkers behind him and said to one man: "But you know what, I like you. You are special people."

The President didn't name Warren in his remarks.

Pocahontas was a 17th century historical figure, and using her name in an intentionally disparaging way insults native peoples and degrades their cultures.