Local News

Nonprofits struggling with donations, volunteers

Posted March 27, 2020 3:41 p.m. EDT
Updated March 27, 2020 8:22 p.m. EDT

— The coronavirus pandemic has created mass uncertainty across the entire business world. It is an especially difficult time for non-profit organizations that depend upon donations.

It's also an uncertain time for the people who rely on their services.

Since last week, Urban Ministries of Wake County started filling up cars with groceries.

“We don’t know how long this is going to last," Jastina Wiggins said. "A lot of food is being taken off the shelves as we speak in grocery stores.” This effort is to help people like Wiggins who can’t seem to find what she needs.

“My kids drink a lot of milk...There’s no milk anywhere I could find,” Wiggins said.

The non-profit is still taking monetary donations but have canceled physical donations due to the stay at home order.

The organization is doing its best to keep up with demand, but is in desperate need of volunteers to hand out food.

“School is out and people need to feed their kids," said Nick Robertson. "My kids are home and they’re eating up everything,” the member of Urban Ministries added.

The ministry is part of the disaster relief program with the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina that provides food once a week, but that only goes so far.

“If we get more donations, More monetary donations, we could probably give more, Robertson said. "The help is needed more and more."


Pick up for food starts at 9 A.M. The ministry serves everyone until they hit 50 cars, at which point they have to start turning people away.

The Helen Wright Center for Women is also open and is housing 33 women who are now staying all day. They are also seeking assistance with meals from the community.

For more information on how to help, go to: Urban Ministries' website

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