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Consumer Reports tests toilets for efficiency

Posted April 4, 2012 5:00 p.m. EDT
Updated April 4, 2012 6:54 p.m. EDT

Having an efficient toilet isn't something most people think about often, but given the fact that the average person flushes a toilet more than 140,000 times in their life, maybe it should be.

— Having an efficient toilet isn't something most people think about often, but given the fact that the average person flushes a toilet more than 140,000 times in their life, maybe it should be. 

Consumer Reports tested different models to see which ones can help keep money from going down the drain. 

"Toilets that use less water can save you more than $90 a year on your utility bills," Consumer Reports' Bob Markovich said. 

Testers inspected dual-flush models that allow consumers to use more or less water as needed and others that have the federal government's WaterSense label.

Products bearing the WaterSense label are up to 20 percent more water efficient than average products in that category and provide measurable water savings results.

 

While efficiency was a main focus of Consumer Reports' tests, models were also inspected for water power. Testers flushed a variety of objects, including sponges and plastic balls. 

"As for liquid waste, all the toilets rated excellent," Markovich said. "That's a first."

Testers also compared noise levels. 

When all the tests were done, Consumer Reports named two best buys, the AquaSource available at Lowe's Home Improvement and the Glacier Bay dual-flush model sold at Home Depot. Both models cost $100.