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Weekly Wrap: Teacher tenure, incentives

Posted January 23, 2015

— As lawmakers prepare to return to session next week, one of their previous pieces of legislation came under scrutiny this week.

The state Court of Appeals heard arguments in a lawsuit over a 2013 budget provision designed to strip veteran teachers of their tenure rights by 2018. A Superior Court judge last year determined the law was unconstitutional, and the appellate judges sounded skeptical about its legality.

Gov. Pat McCrory also hinted at a new jobs development initiative while at the opening of the office for the state's new nonprofit business recruitment effort. He has repeatedly pushed for more incentives for businesses to locate or expand in North Carolina.

One such business could be Volvo, which is reportedly looking at building a plant in the southeast U.S. Meanwhile, film productions are packing up and leaving the state because lawmakers refused to extend a tax break for such productions when it expired last month.

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  • Objective Scientist Jan 26, 2015

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    Absolutely, entirely different... not even in the same universe different!

  • Terry Watts Jan 26, 2015
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    While I'm sure the research would be interesting, "tenure" in terms of NC Public Schools teachers is an entirely different beast from "tenure" in terms of University professors (such as those at NCSU).

  • Objective Scientist Jan 26, 2015

    Continuation of last comment: Then there are the "Lecturers" or "Instructors"... often very knowledgeable folks who are hired to teach... period, with no expectations of research. Focusing on teaching, unburdened by an unreasonable research expectation, enables those folks to truly do a better job teaching. That said... for each group I described that is the general pattern, but there are good/great teachers.. and "horrible" teachers in each group as well. The question seems simple, and a mere tabulation of responses the same... reality - not so much!

  • Objective Scientist Jan 26, 2015

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    Such survery, about preference... or not, for tenured professors vs untenured professors would need to be a bit more comprehensive that a simple question of "which do you prefer?" At a Research I Level University such as NCSU there are professor who are virtually 100% researchers. They could be GREAT teachers, but never enter a classroom because they "buy out" their teaching with the research grants they receive. There are probably some profs who gained tenure, but "tired of the rat-race" of trying to constantly seek grant money to do research and "don't care" if they advance to the rank of Professor... who truly focus on their teaching and spend their time in preparation for class than do researcher colleagues... they may be better teachers. Then... there are many profs who are "in between" those two. They seek promotion and seek to obtain grants and do the research necessary to accomplish that... which means their teaching suffers.

  • EaglePride1989 Jan 26, 2015

    Laura Leslie, I recommend you do a story on tenured professors, from the students' point of view. WRAL is located right in the middle of NCSU campus -- ask them if they prefer classes taught by tenured professors. Results may surprise you.

  • Terry Watts Jan 26, 2015
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    Some highlights from a study done at NCSU (Dr. Robert Handfield):

    • The direct spend by the film and television industry in North Carolina from 2007-2012 is $1,020,000,000. When compared to the cost of the credit ($112,000,000) over the same period of time, the result is for every dollar of the credit issued, the industry spends $9.11 within the State.
    • The projected tax revenue collected as a result of film and television production from 2007-2012 is $170,330,307. When compared to the cost of the credit ($112,000,000) over the same period of time, the result is for every dollar of the credit issued, the industry generates $1.52 in tax revenue back to the State.
    For 2012 alone, the production tax incentive contributed a net positive cash flow of $25.3 million for North Carolina. This is the difference between the 2012 cost of the incentive ($60.14M) and tax revenue collected by state and

  • AlbertEinstein Jan 26, 2015

    MRAMURCHA - "What would you expect a businessman to do for the NC movie industry" would be a better question. From a business perspective, we should be very careful how we attempt to give away the farm for... just exactly what would the NC movie industry bring to NC? Short term jobs and another Andy?

  • Mary Jo Holmes Jan 25, 2015
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    Why didn't McCrory do anything for the NC movie industry?

  • Bob Smith Jan 25, 2015
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    Laura Leslie is so dreamy.

  • Olenc Native Jan 25, 2015
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    That Binker is so dreamy.