Local News

Weapons, ammo stolen from Cumberland home

Posted September 23, 2013

— Cumberland County investigators will set up command posts in the Grays Creek community Tuesday as they continue to search for high-powered weapons and a cache of ammunition stolen last week from a home in the area.

The homeowner noticed on Sept. 17 that a semi-automatic handgun, an assault rifle and two 9mm semi-automatic rifles, along with thousands of rounds of ammunition, had been taken, authorities said Monday.

Investigators plan to set up a command post to gather tips and answer questions at a BP gas station and convenience store at the intersection of Chickenfoot and Marrocco Roads from 8 to 11 a.m. Tuesday and at a Food Lion at the intersection of N.C. Highway 87 and Sandhill Road from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Anyone with information about the case is asked to call the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Office at 910-323-1500.

20 Comments

This story is closed for comments.

Oldest First
View all
  • submoa Sep 24, 9:36 a.m.

    I can't say for sure what, if any, safe the owner could have had. I do know that even cheaper safes are passing quality and security examinations these days. I think of it this way.

    If you buy one gun, get a safe. It may cost way more than the gun, but so will ammo these days ( an empty gun is as useful as one that is stolen) But as you collect more, the safe will protect everything inside it and be worth way less than what it protects.

  • Eric the Actor Sep 24, 8:13 a.m.

    Sorry sohappy, I was being sarcastic. I was pointing out that it was ludicrous to state that there were hundreds of break ins there a day and that wral was only reporting this one due to a "liberal agenda."

  • kermit60 Sep 24, 8:11 a.m.

    Securing the weapons in a safe would be smart and the article doesn't say they were not secured. However mandating it with a law or fining someone is a little to much control. Maybe we should require all cars are locked in a properly secured garage so they don't get stolen, subject to a fine also. We all know that cars kill far more people than guns in the U.S.

  • clintoflannagan Sep 23, 4:59 p.m.

    "Uh... you realize the typical gun safe, with stuff in it, weighs like 800-1000 pounds, and is BOLTED TO THE FLOOR, right?

    If anybody comes into my home who can just pick that up and carry it away, I'm not gonna stop em.

    if Superman wants my safe he can have it!"

    Of course I realize that many safes are very heavy. Did yours just materialize in your home? Somebody brought it to you and installed it didn't they? Do you think that they are the only people on the planet who have the knowledge and wherewithal to deal with heavy safes?

    Obviously, if you have an 800 pound cast iron safe then it's more likely not to get stolen. But I also know that light, stackable safes are extraordinarily light and easy to break into.

    I don't think it's a stretch to say that probably the majority of gun safe owners have the light, inexpensive, stackable ones. But I also know that there are plenty of examples over time where heavy safes have been stolen with contents.

  • sohappy Sep 23, 4:37 p.m.

    I live in Grays Creek. It's not a "dangerous" place. To say "Sounds like Grays Creek is a truly frightening place to live." is so wrong. We live on the outskirts of Fayetteville...and like any other place there is crime. Sad to say but true. Grays Creek is no different than any other place this day and age with hard working people being robbed by lazy bums.

  • junkmail5 Sep 23, 4:23 p.m.

    Gun safes get stolen all the time. In fact, in some ways it makes it easier for the thieves when the guns are all packaged up nicely in one area. That way they don't have to search the entire house for all the guns. They just go to the gunsafe and steal it, then open it somewhere else.
    clintoflannagan

    Uh... you realize the typical gun safe, with stuff in it, weighs like 800-1000 pounds, and is BOLTED TO THE FLOOR, right?

    If anybody comes into my home who can just pick that up and carry it away, I'm not gonna stop em.

    if Superman wants my safe he can have it!

  • Eric the Actor Sep 23, 4:18 p.m.

    "There are literally hundreds of break ins occurring every day in this area. I wonder why all of them don't have an article written about them"
    There are LITERALLY HUNDREDS of break ins EVERY DAY in a town of less than 8,000 people? Sounds like Grays Creek is a truly frightening place to live.

  • clintoflannagan Sep 23, 4:10 p.m.

    Where does it say in the article that the weapons weren't secured in a safe?

    Gun safes get stolen all the time. In fact, in some ways it makes it easier for the thieves when the guns are all packaged up nicely in one area. That way they don't have to search the entire house for all the guns. They just go to the gunsafe and steal it, then open it somewhere else.

  • outdoor592000 Sep 23, 3:52 p.m.

    Good one Ripetomatoes!! He probably didn't want to go through the background checks to purchase them legally...........that is why all those laws didn't really impact this guy.

  • SFSOLDIER Sep 23, 3:50 p.m.

    No one can assume weapons are "safe" in their home unless they are locked in a safe and the safe is bolted to the floor...at that point, the owner has done everything possible to keep these weapons out of the hands of felons. All serial numbers need to be written down and put in a safe place (away from the safe where the weapons are located).

More...