Wake County Schools

WCPSS proposes goal of 95 percent graduation rate in draft strategic plan

Posted January 5, 2015

Wake County Public School System
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— Wake school leaders want to annually graduate at least 95 percent of students that are “ready for higher education, career and productive citizenship.”

The objective is part of the Wake County Public School System’s proposed five-year strategic plan, which school board members will discuss during a Tuesday afternoon work session.

The plan focuses on educating students that are prepared for a “complex and changing world” and that are “collaborative, creative and critical thinkers.”

The draft document comes after months of the district soliciting public input through stakeholder focus groups, town hall meetings and an online survey where nearly 10,000 people shared their thoughts on the state’s largest school district.

Some of the suggestions were incorporated into the plan’s five pillars: Learning & Teaching, Achievement, Balanced Assessment System, Human Capital and Community Engagement.

But the document does not directly address one of the biggest concerns from stakeholders – teacher pay. More than 600 teachers left Wake schools between July 2013 and April, in part due to pay, according to the district.

“The majority of stakeholder cohorts (principals, teachers, community groups, school board, and teachers) could give examples of the outbound churn of teachers leaving for other school systems or private schools due to low compensation in Wake County,” according to an August survey results report. “Moreover, the current pay does nothing to encourage the most talented students to pursue a teaching degree.”

In the past, the district has fallen short of its strategic plan goals:

  • In 2003, Wake schools wanted 95 percent of its students to score at or above grade level on state reading and math tests. The district ended up with 91.7 percent proficiency.
  • Five years later, the district wanted 95 percent of students in grades 3-12 to score at or above grade level on state tests and for all student groups to demonstrate high growth. No more than 76 percent of students were proficient on state tests, and no more than 58 percent of students demonstrated high growth.
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  • ladyliberty1885 Jan 7, 2015

    "Some of the suggestions were incorporated into the plan’s five pillars: Learning & Teaching, Achievement, Balanced Assessment System, Human Capital and Community Engagement."

    Human capital?
    Are our kids the 'human capital'?!

    For folks who don't know, this 'strategic plan' is similar to Charlotte Mecklenburg's.

    It cost taxpayers a nice sum to have these 'online forums' which served more as a buffer to real dialogue than actual interaction at school board meetings. Original costs were over 58K, but have likely grown since then.
    See: http://wp.me/p14vwx-2Vn

  • Jenny Miller Jan 6, 2015
    user avatar

    For many reasons this will be the last year my child will be enrolled in WCPSS. Her current school transports under performing children for the inner city 40 minutes to attend her school. Each year I see the same children taking the time of the teacher and slowing down the rest of the class. The same children still can't read but are still passing each grade. HOW?

  • sweet D Jan 6, 2015

    Common Core works.

  • Joseph Shepard Jan 6, 2015
    user avatar

    lessismore Jan 6, 10:55 a.m.

    Welfare and entitlements has reduced the need for an education. We have become a welfare society where you can live comfortably without working. Too bad our politicians don't understand the problem. But, they need votes and the more on welfare the better chance they have to be re-elected.
    Well said..

  • Ryan Kurtz Jan 6, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread


    The answer to your question is that it's always been the parents duty to provide support to their children through their education. It's like going to the gym for an hour a day for 5-days straight, and then each of those days going home and vegging out on Doritos and Twinkies. But, as much as politicians know that's where the problem is really at, they feel the need to dump billions and billions more annually into education because, as we all know, throwing more money at it, especially from the government, always solves the problem.

  • Ginger Lynn Jan 6, 2015
    user avatar

    If you have a pulse, you can pass.

  • Erica Konopka Jan 6, 2015
    user avatar

    It's sad that we don't already have this. I'm fortunate that my kids go to a very high performing school, and it makes me sad that not all kids are getting the education they need. Sadly, a lot of that is due to their own fault and lack of desire to receive said education, and worst of all, lack of parental support in the home.

    Which brings to question...is the low graduation rate of our county mainly the fault of the schools or the parents? Lets figure out the reason before we develop immeasurable metrics to live and die by.

  • Smilester Jan 6, 2015

    Their new policies have made it virtually impossible to fail unless you really, really want to fail. This shouldn't be hard. Unfortunately it also diminishes the value of education for those students who do care about learning.

  • lessismore Jan 6, 2015

    Welfare and entitlements has reduced the need for an education. We have become a welfare society where you can live comfortably without working. Too bad our politicians don't understand the problem. But, they need votes and the more on welfare the better chance they have to be re-elected.

  • Paul Costa Jan 6, 2015
    user avatar

    They will reach the goal by lowering all the standards... again.. that is the only way

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