Wake County Schools

Wake schools to consider going door-to-door to get dropouts back in school

Posted May 11, 2015

Map Marker  Find News Near Me

— Wake County Public School System officials are considering going door-to-door to get high school dropouts back in school and creating a special curriculum to keep them there.

That curriculum – the Wake Acceleration Academy – would involve collaborative learning through projects and tailored learning plans.

The idea was discussed during a district student achievement committee meeting Monday afternoon.

District officials want to have three academies with a total of 750 students by the fall. They’re also looking at creating such schools for students before they drop out.

"The fact is, we are more keenly aware, and have more data than we ever have about what students need, what they could benefit from, their different learning styles,” said Todd Wirt, the district’s assistant superintendent for academics. “So I think we have an obligation to provide students with some of these different environments."

Under the acceleration model, which is currently being used in Florida and Washington, teaching takes place in a more relaxing environment with couches and a cafe instead of desks.

"You walk in a big commons area," Wirt said. "There might be five or six kids there, meeting with a teacher. Study groups off the side where you would have small groups of students. Flexible hours, self-paced, one-on-one assistance. So it doesn't have that feel of the high school setting."

15 Comments

Please with your WRAL.com account to comment on this story. You also will need a Facebook account to comment.

Oldest First
View all
  • Pam Snyder May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    This is crazy! I know MY CHILDREN would LOVE more relaxed classrooms and the luxuries. Even the teachers would and guess what?? They deserve it!!! I don't like that children drop out and some don't have strong families to support them. However, we can't fix the school system by coddling the ones that drop out!

  • Trena Kirby May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    I'm a teacher and I know lots and lots of students who would like to learn on couches and in cafes. Why are they less deserving of these luxuries? Are at-risk students the only ones who have differences in learning styles? Meanwhile the students in my classes don't have textbooks.

  • Sammy Macloud May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread


    EXACTLY!!

  • Sammy Macloud May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    if PARENTS can't get the kids to go to school what makes WCPSS think they can? I understand the intent but think it's misguided. Part of the entire problem is the school systems history of passing kids so as not to hurt their self esteem or some such thing! I agree kids should stay in school but I think they should be held to the same standards as all students. If they need 'special education' then that's different, but don't just push these kids thru school so WCPSS looks like they have a better grad rate....that's just crazy

  • Chris Vet May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread



    parents need to be more involved in their child's education.

  • Chris Vet May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    They want to tailor their program to convince dropouts to come back? Why should they get any special treatment? Just send them Burger King applications.

  • William James May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    The solution to reducing the number of Drop Outs is obvious, but everyone is far too complacent to fix it. Kids who typically drop out lack the required basic reading and math skills to pass the material, so the answer is to work one on one with these kids everyday until the catch back up, but no one is willing spend this amount of time and energy into something that pays little or nothing.

  • Terry Watts May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread


    ^^^this

  • Angie Cox May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    I would love for them to return to school and earn a degree but unfortunately, most of these kids don't have parents who communicate the importance of education in their household. so a stranger won't be able to do it either but it's worth a try. it may aid in getting some of these kids off the streets.

  • Sherrill Craig May 12, 2015
    user avatar

    waste of resources and time. You cannot MAKE someone go to school if that child does not have the wherewithal to attend. If they are lucky, they will realise their mistake and get their GED, and if not, they join a long list of people with less than ambitious employment making minimum wage and asking for 15 bucks an hour.

More...