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Raleigh Police Union will not boycott upcoming Beyoncé concert

Posted February 23

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— The Raleigh Police Protective Association voted unanimously Tuesday night to not boycott the upcoming Beyoncé concert on May 3 at North Carolina State University’s Carter-Finley Stadium.

Several police unions across the country viewed Beyoncé’s Super Bowl 50 halftime performance as “anti-police.” In addition to her halftime show in Santa Clara, others have expressed issues with her “Formation” music video.

In the video, Beyoncé is seen on the top of a police car sinking in what looks to be flood water. There’s also a clip of police officers with their hands in the air and the words “stop shooting us” spray painted on a wall.

Officers across the country have said they believe Beyoncé was making a political statement in response to the number of police-related shootings, where young black men were killed.

"While we do have concerns over the perceived anti-law enforcement images Ms. Knowles uses in her most recent music video and her halftime performance at the Super Bowl, we voted unanimously not to boycott the May 3 concert," read a statement from Raleigh Police Protective Association president Matt Cooper. "We encourage police officers to make an individual decision whether to volunteer to work off-duty at this concert."

In the same statement, Cooper said that the 550 member Police Protective Association does not condone violence against police officers and will continue to speak out against 'negative depictions of our officers, including violence targeted at the courageous men and women who give their lives to keep our communities safe."

Although he would not give an exact number, Cooper said several officers within the organization expressed concerns over Beyoncé's Super Bowl performance, specifially with her dancers, who were dressed similar to members of the Black Panther Party.

"There's been some perception that they have also used some violence towards police officers and we're not supportive of that," Cooper said.

Fayetteville Police Chief Harold Medlock said the choice to boycott the concert could have resulted in taking money out of taxpayers’ pockets.

Medlock said regardless of what is being said or expressed by an artist, it doesn’t give any officer on duty the right to not protect and serve.

“One of those rights under our constitution is the right of free speech and self-expression,” Medlock said. “Not everything that I protect I agree with, but that’s not my job. My job is to protect those folks and give them the opportunity to express themselves.”

Many of the officers who work special events are off-duty officers paid by the organization behind the event.

"We have many officers that come from different backgrounds, different beliefs, and different political affiliations," Cooper said.

18 Comments

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  • Kim Schrock Feb 25, 2016
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    No Guts!

  • Janet Ghumri Feb 24, 2016
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    Some will only see what they want to see. BLM, okay, that's just lovely, but other people shouldn't be excluded because they don't have a tag line.
    I don't see a protest sprouting up every time and officer is killed in the line of duty. I don't see a PLM, or WLM, for the white people. Why? That would be considered racist. We can have a special charity fund for college, if it's for black students, and a beauty pagent for black women, but the same for white only? ? No, no, no! That's racist!
    A mind is a terrible thing to waste, right? Once we, all of us, realize that we cannot expect special treatment because of our skin color, maybe we will improve. The reverse racism is bringing out more hostility everyday. If your life matters more than mine, I will always feel the injustice.

  • Steve Clark Feb 24, 2016
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    Tandy, of course it happens. It's very Very rare, but of course.. there ARE some bad cops out there, and they should be prosecuted (like the guy in Charleston). But don't you agree that the bigger problem is the amount of crime? Black lives matter, 500 people were shot and killed in Chicago alone last year.. and over 400 were black; and they weren't shot by white cops.. Bernie and Hillary keep mentioning that there are too many blacks in jail... but how did they get there? It's because they committed a crime. I'm WITH you.. get the bad cops out.. but honestly.. there's a Much bigger problem in the black community than white cops.

  • Dan Wilder Feb 24, 2016
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    Another officer killed and two wounded today..

  • Dan Wilder Feb 24, 2016
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    By the way 8 police officers were killed in the line of duty last week but probably no one knows about it, there has been no protest or riots, no business's looted and burned...No speeches of condemnation from the president...Well....maybe it's time that people were left on their own for a while to face the ugliness and dangers of the street instead of having someone else do it for you. After all, isn't your life actually your responsibility.

  • Dan Wilder Feb 24, 2016
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    What does occur?

  • Tandy Dawgy Feb 24, 2016
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    Good for the Raleigh PPA.

  • Tandy Dawgy Feb 24, 2016
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    "And remember that most of these incidences were initiated by the suspect."

    Ah, most. So you are saying and agreeing that this does occur? Case closed.

  • Dan Wilder Feb 24, 2016
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    " who routinely kill unarmed detainees."
    I know it seems a lot to you because those are the only cases that you hear about but consider that there are thousands of cases of police use of some level of force every day. You will see that fatal cases are relatively rare in comparison. So it does need inquiry but it is far from routine.

  • Dan Wilder Feb 24, 2016
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    There are usually two parts to a community, (A) the decent law abiding part that police are trying to protect and (B) the lawless, troublemakers and criminals that the police are protecting (A) from. You can build bridges to (A) but you can't build Bridges to (B) because they are the ones the police are hired to control and remove from society.

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