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Two fatalities not first worker deaths at Goldsboro plant

Posted December 1, 2015
Updated December 2, 2015

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— The transformer plant in Goldsboro where two workers died Monday night also was the site of a workplace fatality in 2012, according to state regulators.

Authorities said Dennis Martin, 51, of Goldsboro, and Daniel Craig Anderson, 33, of Dudley, died, and William Saviak, 40, also of Dudley, was injured Monday when one of them fell into a transformer at SPX Transformer Solutions Inc. and two others went in to help him but became unresponsive.

Authorities haven't said which of the three fell or how the two men died. Saviak was in critical condition Tuesday in the intensive care unit at Wayne Memorial Hospital.

The Occupational Safety and Health Division of the state Department of Labor was investigating the incident.

OSH last investigated SPX three years ago, when a worker there was electrocuted, Department of Labor spokesman Neal O'Briant said. No citations were issued in that case, he said.

State investigators have cited SPX for numerous workplace safety violations in the past 15 years, however.

Two serious violations were found in a 2007 inspection, one was found in 2006, another two in 2005 and 10 in 2001, according to O'Briant. SPX has paid more than $15,000 in penalties to resolve the various citations.

"The safety of our employees and their work environment is a top priority for SPX," the Waukesha, Wis.-based company said in a statement, adding that officials are working with investigators to determine what happened at the plant on U.S. Highway 117.

"We are shocked and deeply saddened by this incident and offer our sincerest condolences to the families and loved ones of the employees involved," the company statement said.

Anderson became a father earlier this year, according to a neighbor, while Martin was a grandfather.

SPX is one of the largest manufacturers of power transformers in the United States. The company employs about 1,000 people and has plants in Wisconsin and Texas as well as Goldsboro.


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  • Angela Wall Dec 2, 2015
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    I was thinking the exact same thing Doug! I teach at Wayne and have graduates who work at SPX and know folks in management and they are really serious about safety. A serious violation could be that the inspection tag on a fire extinguisher is turned backwards with OSHA! The fact that they've received the silver award two years in a row, previously reported, tells you that they were putting forth a lot of time, effort, and money to have a safe work environment. Sometimes things just happen because people are not perfect. And for those who keep harping on confined space entry - most people don't intend to fall into a confined space, but when you see that happen it's hard to remember your training because you think "I can just get him out real quick and be ok." Loyalty to friends and coworkers becomes forefront in your mind and all you can think about is helping someone. This is just digging up things that are probably totally irrelevant to this situation.

  • Joseph Mallard Dec 2, 2015
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    View quoted thread

    Where did you get that 3 people were dead? The headline and article both, clearly say 2 men died and one is in the hospital. Reading comprehension is a wonderful trait.

  • Mike Smith Dec 1, 2015
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    When story first broke they were praising tbem for receiving OSHA SAFETY AWARD now its all about serious violatons. WHY DONT WRAL LIST EACH VIOLATION

  • Brian Jones Dec 1, 2015
    user avatar

    This poor fellow,..fell to his death......The current 3 deceased persons were entering an area and dying from something in the air.......

  • Doug Smallen Dec 1, 2015
    user avatar

    A serious violation can be no more than a cut in a drop cord, if you have been cited for it within past three years. Reporting these previous violations only fools the uninformed of OSHA violations.