Traffic

Triangle Transit, Capital Area Transit considering fare increases

Posted November 6, 2013

Triangle Transit
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— Triangle Transit and Capital Area Transit are considering fare increases and want to hear from customers about the proposed changes.

The transit agencies have operated at current fare structures for nearly a decade, but during that time, the costs to run bus services have risen, according to the agencies. 

To close the growing gap, Triangle Transit and CAT have proposed fare increases in 2014 and 2015 that will allow the transit systems to keep pace with inflation, continue bus services and provide facilities. Triangle Transit and CAT have estimated boardings of 28,000 each weekday.

Five public workshops in November will be held to gather input on how the proposed fare increases may affect local, regional and express transit riders. There will not be a formal presentation and the same information will be presented at each location:

Wednesday, Nov. 6 – 3:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m. – Durham Station
515 W. Pettigrew St., Durham

Tuesday, Nov. 12 – 4 p.m.-7 p.m. – Green Road Community Center
4201 Green Rd., Raleigh

Thursday, Nov. 14 – 3:30 p.m.-7 p.m. – One Exchange Plaza next to
Moore Square Transit Station, Raleigh

Monday, Nov. 18 – 4 p.m.-7 p.m. – Chapel Hill Public Library
100 Library Dr., Chapel Hill

Wednesday, Nov. 20 – 3:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. – Woodcroft Club
1203 Woodcroft Pkwy., Durham

A fare equity analysis is also being conducted under federal guidelines for implementing Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to review how the proposed changes may affect minority and low income populations. At these meetings, the public will have an opportunity to learn more about proposed Title VI policies for Triangle Transit and CAT and to provide comments on those policies.

Customers unable to attend one of the public meetings are encouraged to provide feedback at www.gotriangle.org/fareincrease and fill out an online comment form. Comments may also be left by email at serviceplanning@gotriangle.org or by leaving a voice mail at 919.485.PLAN (7526).

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  • PickAnotherID Nov 8, 2013

    "About time that those who use mass transit start funding the real cost of mass transit instead of being funded by those who don't use it."

    And maybe we should put toll gates on the entrances to area 'Greenways', which are 100% subsized, while we're at it. They are subsidized by all tax payers, whether they use them or not.

    At least bus riders aren't being 100% subsidized. Looking at Cary's budget numbers, fares from riders are covering right on 10% of the costs. Which at least pays for the Town staff that administers the system.

  • westernwake1 Nov 8, 2013

    I can understand that the current financial situation for the buses is not sustainable - either the fares need to be increased or more public funding provided. The question of which approach should be used is a public policy issue.

  • ILoveDowntownRaleigh Nov 7, 2013

    "the author of the article is a dyed in the wool democrat and Meeker supporter. That was 4 years ago while Meeker was still in office. No way on creation is this expense under 1 million." - hadenough

    If you have new facts that would help us more accurately fix the R-Line cost, by all means share them. I don't see any in this post.

  • ILoveDowntownRaleigh Nov 7, 2013

    "About time that those who use mass transit start funding the real cost of mass transit instead of being funded by those who don't use it." - conservativevoter

    Sad to think someone would consider quality transportation in the city of Raleigh to be a target for their political rhetoric, but here it is, and it doesn't surprise me at all.

  • ConservativeVoter Nov 7, 2013

    About time that those who use mass transit start funding the real cost of mass transit instead of being funded by those who don't use it.

  • HadEnough Nov 7, 2013

    daddyankee - thanks for putting me onto the article. Those figures are from Dec 2009. Also, the author of the article is a dyed in the wool democrat and Meeker supporter. That was 4 years ago while Meeker was still in office. No way on creation is this expense under 1 million.

  • daddyankee Nov 7, 2013

    HadEnough you need to edumacate yourself a little better. First off the R-Line runs as an electric hybrid so fuel costs are minimized. Also bus drivers don't make much in the way of salary. Where you get your figures I have no idea but you can see the actual figures if you search the indyweek website for 'doing the math on the r-line' article. I would post the link here but it may be against guidelines.

  • ILoveDowntownRaleigh Nov 7, 2013

    "The R-Line operation cost is around 800-900K a year." - daddyankee

    IMO, the R-Line service is well worth the cost, and has become part of the city's identity.

    As for the proposed CAT fare increase: I seriously hope they will reconsider this idea. Without a simple $1 fare, ridership will slide, and the value of CAT to our community will be reduced.

    Then again, maybe there is a silver lining. These fare increases might open the door to some creative entrepreneurial private shuttle service that can provide better low-cost transportation options to Raleigh neighborhoods.

  • HadEnough Nov 7, 2013

    Two buses, Several drivers, Fuel, Insurance and you think it's only 800k per year. I have bridge to sell you daddyyankee.

  • daddyankee Nov 7, 2013

    The R-Line operation cost is around 800-900K a year.

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