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Triangle pharmaceutical company: 'Female Viagra' performs well in clinical tests

Posted September 10, 2014

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— When the Food and Drug Administration denied approval of Flibanserin last year, officials told Sprout Pharmaceuticals they wanted to see additional work on the drug that is designed to help treat female sexual dysfunction.

That work has continued in the form of clinical tests, and the Raleigh-based company will resubmit its request for approval in December with promising new results.

In recent tests, women on average doubled the number of satisfying sexual events and reported a 50 percent increase in sexual desire.

Amanda Parrish, a working mother of four, said she loved what the drug did for her. She said she felt a difference in less than a week.

"In the middle of the day, I could text Ben (her husband) for no apparent reason and start talking to him, and I would get that little flutter. I don't mean in my heart flutter," she said. "I would start getting aroused at noon, which that had never happened to me."

Sex therapist Laure Watson says renewed interest alone could do wonders for many relationships.

"Sex is something that binds us together. Literally oxytocin is released, and that's a bonding chemical," Watson said. "Without that, part of us that soothes and motivates us to forgive each other is gone.

Parrish agreed, saying her relationship with her husband improved.

"My relationship with my kids got better, I was not as irritable as I had been. I had the best sales year I've ever had in my career," she said.

If approved, Sprout's little pink pill will be the first on the market to treat female sexual dysfunction. Forty-three percent of women suffer from some kind of sexual dysfunction, and about 10 percent of those women suffer from hypo-active sexual desire disorder, or a lack of desire.

"It's a huge problem," Watson said of female sexual dysfunction. "Women don't have naturally occurring libido where they want it."

Flibanserin, which is non-hormonal, works on chemicals in the brain that impact sexual desire. Sprout officials said it could be on the market by the middle of 2015 if it gets a thumbs-up from the FDA.

About 15 percent of the women tested dropped out of clinical trials because of the drug's side effects, which include fatigue, nausea and dizziness.

Parrish, who said she didn't suffer any problems with side effects, said she'd buy the drug.

"In a heartbeat. I'm waiting for it to be approved. I would be the first one at the door," she said.

Capitol Broadcasting, parent company of WRAL, is an investor in Sprout Pharmaceuticals.

43 Comments

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  • lttimmons05 Sep 11, 2014

    I'm so happy to hear this news! As a young female being married for 10 years, not enjoying physical intimacy with my husband, has been a long hard road. Thankfully our marriage is more than just the physical intimacy we lack. However, I would love for both of us to enjoy one another and for me to have a desire. How do I get in on the clinical trials? Where do I sign up???

  • Gatsby Sep 10, 2014

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    For about 4 hour period...neither would care...then they would need separate tubs to soak & cool down.

  • CNWBT Sep 10, 2014

    As a woman, I appreciate you covering this WRAL. That patient saw a real difference in her life and I believe this treatment should be made available to her and the countless other women who love their husbands and want intimacy back. Women can't will away a medical condition. Let's help them FDA.

  • SAY 'WHAT" ONE MORE TIME! Sep 10, 2014

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    Been married for years. You're preaching to the choir

  • jwsawyer Sep 10, 2014

    How is the effectiveness determined?

  • Paul Hill Sep 10, 2014
    user avatar

    "Yea, but then she couldn't remember what happened." tc35d

    Really?...there's vid cams on toys today...geez...moments are forever now.

  • btneast Sep 10, 2014

    Intimacy with your spouse isn't something that should have to be earned as you imply.I don't think she meant it was earned by some sort of points system of tasks, but rather the gesture of doing the things she mentioned would "endear" her more to her husband ....plus its hard for a woman to think of romance when there are a lot of mundane tasks to be done. Women approach sex mentally more so than men, who are more physical.

  • SAY 'WHAT" ONE MORE TIME! Sep 10, 2014

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    Yeah....no. Not that I or other men don't do those things but it's not a negotiation. Intimacy with your spouse isn't something that should have to be earned as you imply. Now, being grateful for the help and expressing gratitude is one thing but conditioning intimacy based on that isn't right. It's part of a healthy relationship. If someone has a husband that won't help with the kids, or the house, or cook, they may need another husband. I work full time, as does my wife. We have two kids, etc. We BOTH cook, clean, and take care of our kids and I'll quickly tell her I can shut out the world for her. She should do the same for me. And if she needs/wants a drug to help I'll pick up her prescription on my way home from work

  • New Holland Sep 10, 2014
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    This would be a start but your still not looking at the underlying issue, the brain. The brain is where this drug works on not the rest of the body. Remember women think with their brains men think with their ...well you know what

  • foodstamptrader Sep 10, 2014

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    And what if a hit of Viagra was placed in his drink? Would they both be charged or would they just have one heck of a night?

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