Traffic

DOT to spend at least $300K to reroute I-40 in Greensboro

Posted September 15, 2008

The Department of Transportation is expected to spend at least an estimated $300,000 to $350,000 to reroute Interstate 40 in Greensboro back to its original location.

The DOT says the Greensboro Urban Loop, completed several years ago, was routed to comprise I-40, Interstate 73 and Interstate 85 because engineers thought it would be safer, quicker and less congested.

But motorists complained that the route is confusing (the old I-40 is not Interstate 40 Business), and residents living near the new I-40 complained of noise.

“We have reviewed this relocation plan with Greensboro’s Department of Transportation, the Federal Highway Administration and here internally,” said Transportation Division 7 Engineer Mike Mills. “We all agree that this plan will best address the future needs of the transportation system in and around Greensboro.”

The new plan consists of changing the green I-40 Business signs to blue I-40 signs, re-signing exits along I-40 and I-73 and rerouting U.S. Highway 421 to run with I-73 and parts of I-85.

The I-85 Business route and the I-85 exit signs will remain the same.

The cost to change the Greensboro signage is small in comparison with some other troubled DOT projects. A stretch of I-40 in Durham that had to be repaved because of crumbling pavement cost taxpayers close to $22 million.

And a two-mile stretch of Interstate 795 from Wilson to Goldsboro is expected to cost about $1 million to repair potholes.

Federal investigators were looking to see if the entire road needed work. That price tag could approach $7 million.

23 Comments

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  • Builder Sep 17, 2008

    changing signs isn't going to change the noise. Also these people must not have been paying attention in Kindergarden, where they teach you how to follow directions (signs)

  • Bendal1 Sep 16, 2008

    Project priority lists aren't created by DOT; the city and county governments develop those "wish lists" and then prioritize them in order of the project they want done most. DOT then tries to find the funding for as many as possible and schedules them throughout the TIP. Those that aren't funded get put in the "future projects" list.

    BTW, there were public notices made before I-40 was moved onto the I-73/85 route. This was 'in the works' years before it opened and had Federal approval. I'm wondering if the FHWA will accept putting I-40 back on a substandard, deficient route now that's it on a modern, well designed road.

  • Like It TI is Sep 16, 2008

    I travel to the NC mountains quite a bit so I have used both routes. I like the urban loop better because of the wider lanes and less congestion. Like Nandud wrote you just have to take your time when you first use it to make sure you hit your exit. It's just like in Winston-Salem where you don't take the business route on I-40 unless you're going into the city. What's so confusing about that?

    With that said I am no fan of the DOT. I think the confusion started because there were no announcements of the plans to reroute I-40 (or at least I didn't hear any). No they have to spend at least 300K to redo the signs! That is too typical. I've never seen an agency waste money as much as this one does. Did you hear about the wish list for the Raleigh area?

  • jgyoung83 Sep 16, 2008

    Moving I-40 was a good idea. Plans have been in place to reroute it for many years, and there are several valid reasons for this: 40 through Greensboro has improper medians, interchange spacing, and acceleration ramps in some areas. It also must carry a large amount of traffic from the western part of the state to the Triangle, Virginia, and other points North. Overall this creates a fairly dangerous stretch of road. To improve road conditions on old 40 to current design standards is prohibitively expensive. Thus, routing through traffic around Greensboro makes sense. The new route adds approximately 5 miles to the distance traveled. Local traffic can, and should use the old route. This segregation of traffic relieves overall road congestion. The new 40 is well designed and well signed. As long as one commits one's attention to driving, and not other things, it is not confusing. Public hearings were held on the routing; that was the proper time to raise concerns, not now.

  • Nobody but Carolina Sep 16, 2008

    I really like the new route. It only adds about 7 or 8 miles to my trips to the mountains, is just as fast if not a bit faster and is so much nicer and safer than having to drive through that one section in Greensboro with the split and all the on and off ramps. I don't think they should spend this money to switch the signs and anyone who doesn't like the new route can take the 40/85 business route.

  • Bendal1 Sep 16, 2008

    Putting I-40 back on the old route through town isn't going to get truckers to use it; the newer I-73/85 route is a bit longer but about as fast to get through Greensboro on, and it's safer. Truckers will keep using the new route, I predict.

    As for the "third lane to nowhere" at the Clayton Bypass, that lane was added to I-40 because it will be needed when I-40 is widened north up to the old US 70 interchange. It should have been striped out and not opened to traffic though, because it's helping to create those bottlenecks there. Another step that would help is to stripe out one of the lanes on the ramp from the Bypass to I-40. When you've got two lanes entering I-40 there, the traffic takes over both through lanes of I-40. Just one lane entering I-40 wouldn't do that but it might back up traffic on the Bypass. That's better than backing up traffic on I-40 though.

  • determined2win Sep 15, 2008

    Obviously, the DOT doesn't hire individuals that passed the punctuation part of English class...

  • we-r-just-human Sep 15, 2008

    While we're talking about the NCDOT when are they going to fix the Clayton Bypass/40 West ramp.. they added the "third lane to nowhere" and all the "special" people that feel they must go to the front of the line use that lane to bypass the though traffic and cause a BIGGER back up at the end of the merge lanes.

    Now you have a better traffic flow for a few hundred cars at the cost of back ups for a few thousand. All this for $123M

    GREAT JOB.... NOT!!!!!!!!!!!!!



  • pbjbeach Sep 15, 2008

    THE FOX

    I AM VERY MUCH AWARE OF THE FACT THAT CORE HAVE BEEN TAKEN BUT THEY THE UPPER MANGEMENT WILL STILL CONVENCE EVERYONE CONCERNED THAT THEY PAST THE CURRENT SPEC'S AS CURRENTLY DESIGNED BUT THEY WON'T ADDRESS THE FACTS THAT THE OVERALL MIXTURES FOR ALL ALPHALT MIXTURES HAVE BEEN SIFNIFICANTLY CHANGED FOR WHAT THEY USED TO BE ALONG WITH THE FACT THAT ILEFT OUT IN MY EAIRLIER E-MAIL IS THE THE LIQUID ASPHALT ISN'T ANY GOOD ANY MORE THESE DAY COMPARED WITH THE OLDER MIXTURES THAT USED TO BE BEING USED BE PRODUCED WHEN THEY WERE USING AC-20 GRADE LIQUID THESE PG GRADES DON'T HAVE THE ADHEIVE QUALITY'S THAT AC-20 HAD EITHER

  • nandud Sep 15, 2008

    The Urban Loop was opened in February of this year. What are they rerouting?

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