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Foreign cars top list of those likely to last 200,000 miles

Posted June 30, 2015

Who doesn't love a shiny, new car? But then again, who wants the payment that comes with it?

Cars are lasting longer than ever, and it's not uncommon to pass 200,000 miles. Certain models are more likely to get you there.

The average age of a car on a U.S. road is now more than 11 years.

Many new cars are on the road, but there are plenty of relics too. And then there are those that have done some serious traveling.

Brent Mather, the owner of a 2006 Lexus IS 250, has more than 230,000 miles on his odometer.

"I do an oil change every 5,000 miles,” Mather said. “I make sure the air pressure of the tires is good and I keep looking out for it."

Consumer Reports surveyed readers to find out which models most often made it to 200,000 miles.

The responses covered more than a million vehicles. An interesting find: the top 10 were either Toyotas or Hondas.

The Prius, Camry 4-cylinder, Corolla, Sienna V6 and Highlander V6 represent Toyota on the list. From Honda, the Odyssey, Pilot, Accord 4-cylinder sedan, CR-V and the Civic, excluding the SI and GX Hybrid models.

Those owners spent an average of $550 on maintenance and repairs last year on items such as brakes, shocks and timing belts.

According to Consumer Reports, by the time a car hits that stage, you should think about replacing it.

"By 200,000 miles, most cars' hard life on the road has begun to take a toll on the structure and key components," Jim Travers of Consumer Reports said.

Older cars don’t have the latest safety advances, like collision avoidance, blind spot monitoring and lane departure warning.

Newer models can better absorb the impact of a crash and help keep you safe.

14 Comments

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  • Jeff Pridgen Jul 2, 2015
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    I have a 2002 Ford F250 diesel with over 500k miles on in. Its all how you take care of you vehicle.

  • Gina Walker Jul 2, 2015
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    VOLVO...No one mentioned Volvo! You could get 500.000.

  • Roy Hinkley Jul 2, 2015
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    You're making assumptions without having the proper data available to you. You make think it's biased, but there really is no way to know that without a proper look at the full survey methods and data.

  • Tom Glembocki Jul 1, 2015
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    The title of this story needs to be corrected. "American Cars top list of those likely to last 200,000 miles. " is what you really meant in the headline. According to June 29, 2015 Fortune Magazine, the most American car you can buy is a Toyota with 74% American content. Next most American car is Honda. Chrysler is not even on the list of American cars and Ford comes in with less than 50% American.

  • John Kramer Jul 1, 2015
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    Those failures should have been covered under drivetrain warranty.

    Larges recall ever from a number and dollar standpoint? Honda Odyssey Minivan Transmission. Many of the largest recalls are Japanese and other foreign.

    Anecdote:My sister's 2011 Subaru had the engine replaced after a bit of a battle, at 30k miles, high oil consumption. So much for the Safety and Security of All Wheel Drive as their ads claim LOL!

  • Edward Anderson Jul 1, 2015
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    Also not statistically relevant, but my personal experience: 1 VW, lasted well over 300k, 2 Toyota's, over 200k each. 1 Ford engine discentigrated at 57k, 1 GMC transmission failed at 48k. I will NEVER buy American again.

  • John Kramer Jul 1, 2015
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    I love the "made in America" and "assembled in America" red herrings. The profits for those vehicles go to overseas companies, not very American in my book.

  • John Kramer Jul 1, 2015
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    "Consumer Reports surveyed readers to find out which models most often made it to 200,000 miles.

    The responses covered more than a million vehicles. An interesting find: the top 10 were either Toyotas or Hondas."

    In other words, they asked their readers, who buy foreign cars because that is what they always recommend in their reports. That is what I meant by hardly an unbiased sample.

  • Fred Kozlof Jul 1, 2015
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    It's great to be 'pro-american' in your car buying choices, but years and years of CR doing car surveys, shows the Toyota & Honda brands require fewer repairs. And so, a lot of people buy them for THAT reason. You'll always find someone with an 'american' car that lasted 'forever', and you'll find a Toyota or Honda that was a dud, but overall the numbers and data don't lie. Note also, in a story yesterday, the Camry is in the top 10 cars for 'american content', so it's not exactly a foreign car anymore!

  • Roy Hinkley Jul 1, 2015
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    There is no information available about how representative their sample was, or was not. So a guess either way is ill-advised.

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