The Latest: Motorists told to stay off flooded roads

Posted October 14

Crews work to clear the roadway after a vehicle collided with a fallen tree on Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, Thursday,Oct. 13, 2016 in Eugene, Ore. The moderate-to-heavy rains Thursday kick off a stormy period - with a lull predicted Friday before the weather intensifies again Saturday. Later Thursday gusts of up to 65 mph are predicted along the coasts. (Chris Pietsch/The Register-Guard via AP)

— The Latest on a powerful storm in the Pacific Northwest (all times local):

7:47 p.m.

The National Weather Service in Portland, Oregon, is urging people to stay off roads as multiple streets in the city were flooded and impassable after heavy rains hit the area Friday evening.

News outlets reported cars were stranded at flooded intersections and on roads throughout the city. Two eastbound lanes of Interstate 84 downtown were closed due to high water, the light rail system was experiencing delays and all streetcar service was suspended.

The weather service in Portland also said anyone living near small creeks and streams that typically flood need to pay extra attention through Friday.


6:22 p.m.

Coast Guard officials say a rescue is underway for 40 teenagers and six adults who became stranded at an outdoor recreation camp on the Olympic Peninsula west of Port Angeles.

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer Ali Flockerzi says the group called for help Friday afternoon saying they had lost power at Camp David Jr. County Park and that trees were blocking the way out.

Flockerzi says the Coast Guard trailered a boat to another location on the same lake as the camp and was using it as a ferry to bring campers out in groups. She estimated it would take about six trips and nearly six hours, to get everyone out of the camp and to a waiting bus.

No injuries have been reported.


3:20 p.m.

Officials say a 4-year-old boy and his father have been injured by a falling tree branch in West Seattle.

The injuries came amid a storm that brought heavy rains and high winds to the Northwest, including a tornado in Manzanita, Oregon.

Thousands of people are without power in the region.

The Seattle Fire Department posted Friday on Twitter that the child suffered serious injuries and the father minor injuries. They were being taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle.

The department said it didn't immediately have further information about the injuries or circumstances.


12:20 p.m.

The mayor of Manzanita, Oregon, has declared a state of emergency in the wake of a tornado that tore through downtown.

The declaration by Mayor Garry Bullard is necessary for the beach town to be eligible for federal disaster money. The inventory of damage from Friday's tornado is incomplete, but photos and videos show toppled trees, downed power poles, a mangled deck and some wrecked downtown businesses.

Tillamook County Sheriff Andy Long says two businesses are confirmed destroyed and one home is uninhabitable. He says other homes have roof damage.

The Red Cross opened a shelter for victims at Calvary Bible Church.

No injuries have been reported.


11:30 a.m.

Thousands of people were without power in Seattle as heavy rains and winds moved through the Pacific Northwest.

Seattle City Light reported Friday that more than 15,000 customers were affected by an outage, most in the Queen Anne neighborhood north of downtown.

Extreme weather is moving through the Pacific Northwest. A tornado was reported in Manzanita, Oregon, along the coast.


10:25 a.m.

A gallery owner in Manzanita, Oregon, says what started as a typical beach storm instantly became much more.

Debbie Harmon of the Amanita Gallery says out of nowhere the wind suddenly made a "whoooo" sound.

The whole sky filled with debris as a tornado touched down in the small coastal city. Harmon says "it was just crazy and then it just stopped."

Next thing, she saw trees scattered in the road and emergency vehicles headed toward the beach area.


9:10 a.m.

A tornado has been reported on the northern Oregon coast.

Tillamook County Sheriff Andy Long says it touched down in the city of Manzanita about 8:20 a.m. He says there are no reports of injuries, but there have been several calls about damage, including one from a woman who says all the windows in her house were blown out.

Long says the county is sending an additional ambulance to Manzanita, just in case it's needed. He says volunteer firefighters are also being activated.


8:45 a.m.

The National Weather Service issued tornado warnings for southwest Washington and northwest Oregon.

The warnings issued early Friday were in response to a strong thunderstorm that moved through the area. The National Weather Service said there were reports of tornado damage in Manzanita, Oregon, on the coast. No other information was immediately available.

The heavy rain created dangerous conditions for the morning commute, as drivers tried to see out rain-pounded windshields and navigate through standing water on the roads.

Several school districts across the region delayed start times because of the weather.


6:48 a.m.

Strong winds and heavy rain walloped the Pacific Northwest, leaving thousands without power as utility crews prepare for what's expected to be a rougher storm on Saturday.

In Oregon, Portland General Electric reported that more than 4,000 customers were without power at 5 a.m. Friday. Pacific Power reported that 2,800 customers in coastal communities had no lights, down from a peak of more than 15,000.

Portland had the rainiest Oct. 13 in its history. The National Weather Service says a 103-mph wind gust was recorded at Cape Meares.

In Washington, Puget Sound Energy responded to scattered outages, reporting early Friday that more than 2,800 customers were still affected. Lightning strikes hit the southwest Washington coast Friday morning, and a tornado warning was briefly in effect for Pacific County.

Meteorologists expect a breezy Friday before the remnants of a typhoon hit the region Saturday. Forecasters say wind gusts as high as 70 mph could sweep through Seattle.


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