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Latest: Oklahoma governor urges calm after police shooting

Posted September 20

— The Latest on a Tulsa, Oklahoma, police officer's fatal shooting of an unarmed man (all times local):

6:50 p.m.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin is urging Tulsa residents to remain calm as authorities investigate a white police officer's fatal shooting of an unarmed black man.

In a series of tweets Tuesday, Fallin described video of Terence Crutcher's shooting as "troubling" and says her thoughts and prayers are with Crutcher's family.

Fallin also said Tulsa Police Chief Chuck Jordan has assured transparency and fairness in the department's investigation, and that Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler needs time to review the evidence in the case.

About 200 protesters gathered Tuesday evening outside the Tulsa Police Department. Many chanted "Fire Betty," in reference to officer Betty Shelby, who fatally shot Crutcher on Friday night after responding to a report of a stalled vehicle.

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6 p.m.

San Francisco's Colin Kaepernick says the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man in Tulsa is "the perfect example" of what he's protesting when he refuses to stand for the national anthem at 49ers' games.

Kaepernick said Tuesday that "everybody's eyes" will be on Tulsa as authorities investigate the fatal shooting of Terence Crutcher. He says criminal charges should be filed in the shooting death.

The backup quarterback says he's received death threats through social media and other avenues since he began to protest during the national anthem last month.

Tulsa Police say officer Betty Shelby fatally shot Crutcher on Friday as she was responding to a report of a stalled vehicle.

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4:45 p.m.

The Tulsa police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man last week faced no disciplinary actions, and records show she only used force in one instance while working for the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office.

Officer Betty Shelby worked four years at the Tulsa County Sheriff's Office until she joined the city police force in 2011. According to Tulsa County Deputy Justin Green, Shelby's use of force incident happened when she was serving a warrant on a suspect in 2010.

The report says Shelby and other deputies drew their weapons — but did not fire them — as they searched for the suspect.

Tulsa police say Shelby fatally shot 40-year-old Terence Crutcher last Friday while responding to a report of a stalled vehicle.

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4 p.m.

A police spokesman says Tulsa, Oklahoma, officers found the drug PCP in the vehicle of an unarmed black man who was shot to death by a white officer last week.

Tulsa Police Sgt. Dave Walker confirmed to the Tulsa World (http://bit.ly/2d6cYIh ) that investigators recovered a vial of PCP in Terence Crutcher's SUV. Tulsa police officer Betty Shelby fatally shot Crutcher on Friday while responding to a report of a stalled vehicle.

Police say Crutcher did not have a gun on him or in his vehicle, and video footage of the shooting showed him walking toward his SUV with his hands in the air.

At a press conference Tuesday, attorneys representing Crutcher's family said they did not know whether drugs were in Crutcher's vehicle. But attorney Damario Solomon-Simmons said even if drugs were present, Shelby still had no justification for shooting the man because Crutcher did not pose a threat.

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2:40 p.m.

A police spokesman says the Oklahoma officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man had a stun gun at the time but did not use it.

Tulsa Police Sgt. Shane Tuell tells The Associated Press that officer Betty Shelby was certified on the use of stun guns. Police say Shelby fatally shot 40-year-old Terence Crutcher on Friday while responding to a report of a stalled vehicle.

Police say Crutcher did not have a weapon on him or in his SUV.

Shelby's attorney, Scott Wood, told the Tulsa World that Shelby opened fire and another officer used a stun gun when Crutcher's "left hand goes through the car window."

But at a press conference Tuesday, attorneys representing Crutcher's family provided an enlarged photo of the police footage that appeared to show that Crutcher's window was up at the time of the shooting.

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1 p.m.

The mother-in-law of a white Oklahoma police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man says her daughter-in-law is grieving for the victim's family and isn't prejudiced.

Lois Shelby told The Associated Press in a phone interview Tuesday that Tulsa officer Betty Shelby "thought she had to protect her own life" when she fatally shot 40-year-old Terence Crutcher last week.

Dozens of protesters have called for Shelby's immediate arrest for her role in Crutcher's shooting Friday, and at least one other protest is planned Tuesday to call for charges against her. Shelby has been on paid leave since the shooting.

Lois Shelby, a retired schoolteacher, says Betty Shelby always wanted to become a police officer.

Betty Shelby declined to comment to The Associated Press on Tuesday and referred all calls to her attorney.

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12 p.m.

A rally is planned for Tuesday night in Tulsa calling for the arrest of a white police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man.

We the People Oklahoma will hold a "protest for justice" at 6 p.m. at Tulsa's Civic Center Plaza over Friday's shooting death of Terence Crutcher.

The social justice group previously led a petition drive calling for a grand jury investigation into the April 2015 shooting death of Eric Harris. In that case, a grand jury indicted then-Sheriff Stanley Glanz on misdemeanor charges, and the volunteer deputy who shot Harris, Robert Bates, was convicted of second-degree manslaughter.

On Monday, Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler said his office will review police reports and evidence from Crutcher's shooting to determine whether charges should be filed against Tulsa officer Betty Shelby. The prosecutor called Crutcher's death "a tragic event" but declined further comment on the case, citing the ongoing investigation.

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7:15 a.m.

An attorney representing a white Tulsa police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black man says his client opened fire after the man reached through the window of his SUV.

Dashcam and aerial footage showing Officer Betty Shelby's shooting of 40-year-old Terence Crutcher on Friday doesn't offer a clear angle leading up to the shooting, but Crutcher's hands are in the air. Tulsa police say Crutcher didn't have a gun.

Shelby's attorney, Scott Wood, says the encounter unfolded for about 2 minutes before the video footage begins. Shelby didn't activate her patrol car's dashcam.

Wood tells the Tulsa World (http://bit.ly/2cFOk5S ) that Shelby says Crutcher repeatedly ignored officers' commands. He says Shelby opened fire and another officer used a stun gun when Crutcher's "left hand goes through the car window."

State and federal investigations into the shooting death are underway. Shelby is on paid administrative leave.

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1 a.m.

A video from a Tulsa, Oklahoma, police vehicle shows Terence Crutcher walking toward his SUV with his hands up and a female officer following behind him.

The vehicle is stopped in the middle of the road. As Crutcher approaches the SUV, another officer walks up followed by two others and Crutcher appears to lower his hands and reach down and place them on the vehicle. The four officers surround him, making it harder to see his actions from the police dashboard camera's angle.

Crutcher can be seen dropping to the ground. Someone on the police radio says, "I think he may have just been tasered." One of the officers near Crutcher backs up slightly.

Then almost immediately, someone can be heard saying, "Shots fired." Crutcher's head then drops, leaving him lying completely out in the street.

After that a voice can be heard on the police radio saying, "Shots fired. We have one suspect down."

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