National News

Tensions still high after removal of Confederate flag from museum grounds

Posted June 7

— Tensions remain high following the removal of a Confederate flag from the grounds of a museum on the site of a public park in Henry County.

The flag once flew on the grounds of the Nash Farm Battlefield Museum in Hampton, the site of the largest cavalry breakthrough saber charge in Georgia's history.

The decision was made to remove the flag following a heated county commissioner's meeting. The volunteers who run the museum made the decision to close the doors partly because many people believe a Confederate flag shouldn't hang on county property.

Questions have also emerged about the Friends of Nash Park, a private group that operated the Museum at the public park for almost eight years.

Supporters of Friends of Nash Park have touched off an angry social media broadside in which Confederate descendants have gone after Commissioner Clemons calling her various derogatory names and slurs and say she is "another moron that wants to ignore history because of 'feelings.'

Local Chamber of Commerce and NAACP leader Eugene Edwards believes Henry County can teach America how to deal with the past and build a better tomorrow for all citizens.

In 1991, the NAACP adopted a resolution condemning the Confederate battle flag as a symbol of "tyrannical evil" and "an odious blight upon the universe."

The resolution committed the NAACP's legal resources to the removal of the Confederate flag from all public properties.

There is no word on whether the museum will ever reopen.

Copyright 2017 WGCL-TV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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