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Teen drowns in Cary pool

Posted June 11, 2013

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— A teen died Sunday after diving into a pool at Scottish Hills Recreational Club in Cary.

Joy Hall, the mother of 13-year-old Kayla Hall, said her daughter drowned in the deep end of the pool on Saturday and died at the hospital early Sunday. She said Kayla Hall, a student at Salem Middle School in Apex, had no medical conditions and was a strong swimmer.

A 911 caller told dispatchers that the teen hit her head, but that she had a pulse and was breathing after being pulled from the water. Another caller said there was blood on the pool deck and that it was not a drowning.

Joy Hall, however, said her daughter did not hit her head and that a preliminary autopsy showed she died from water in her lungs. A public copy of the autopsy was not immediately available.

Scottish Hills Recreational Club Apex girl, 13, drowns in Cary pool

A Town of Cary spokeswoman said they didn't investigate the incident as a drowning because dispatchers considered it a medical call. 

The recreational club declined to comment on the circumstances of the teen's death. 

A funeral for Kayla Hall is set for 2 p.m. Wednesday at Colonial Baptist Church in Cary.  

23 Comments

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  • irishgirlsarepretty Jun 13, 4:02 p.m.

    How terrible :( Prayers for the family.

  • cindylehner Jun 12, 3:54 p.m.

    This is a tragic event for the family and the community including the Scottish Hills community. My condolences go out the family. As a member of Scottish Hills, I can’t say enough about the staff and members. The staff has always been very disciplined in the safety of the swimmers. There are strict rules around who can be in the dive well and when divers can leave the board. I have always felt very confident in the staff ability to provide a safe environment for my children. But as a parent I understand the risks associated with swimming. Being a strong swimmer reduces the risk of drowning but does not fully take away the risk. While we do everything we can to protect our children unforeseen things occur. So lets take time to pray for the family during this difficult time, and pray for the the people involved in trying to save Kayla for any age that is a tragic situation but these were young adults trying to make a difference.

  • lee0908 Jun 12, 1:14 p.m.

    A followup to my earlier comment on the eyewitness account. I was hesitant to provide much information. However, the witness saw this whole thing happen and alerted the lifeguard instantly. The lifeguard was in the water within seconds and it took 3 people to retrieve the girl from the water. Her nose was bleeding and she was unconscious.

    As far as any blame on the lifeguard, it would not be in regards to the rescue. Rather, allowing swimmers under the diving boards.

  • Bobber Jun 12, 1:01 p.m.

    kmnpj1, your accusations of a coverup are ludicrous. You can blame WRAL for tardiness in reporting the story, but the poor girl's obituary was in yesterday's News & Observer, so it's not like there was some big secret until now.

  • ultraviolet Jun 12, 12:01 p.m.

    well, the mods edited my comment so that it appears that I agreed with kmnpj1's comment. Not the case. I noted that was sarcasm. I also had additional comments that were valid and not offensive, including condolences to the family.

  • chicnrdu Jun 12, 11:34 a.m.

    Prayers for the family. It is awful to think that people are blaming the lifeguards when obvsiouly there is uncertainty to what happened. the report states she was breathing and had a pulse when pulled from the water. Therefore the lifeguard did their job of getting them out and getting help there. As the parent of a teenage lifeguard I can tell you this... my child would risk his life to try to save yours.... my child also wouldn't judge others.... during his training he had to make a decision and determine if doing his very best was good enough... this is alot of pressure put on young adults who not only have to lifeguard but also parent as alot of parents just let their kids go crazy at the pools..

  • ultraviolet Jun 12, 11:14 a.m.

    The third party story of someone landing on her after jumping in seems to put things in perspective.
    I am so sorry for the family. To "kmnpj1" As for lifeguards being teens and responsibility issues, there are MANY ADULTS I would not trust with my life or my kid's lives! And as for a 'cover up' between the pool and town, I am sure that is what this is!

  • luvstoQ Jun 12, 10:24 a.m.

    So sorry for the family. As for teen life guards. My G'daughter is a life guard at Nags Head on the ocean. She had to pass very rigorous tests, also there are explicit rules for when she is in the chair. But even 'they' have to blink sometimes, and with so many 'heads' out there, something could be missed. She has had to save one swimmer, and so far nothing else has happened (last year). They aren't super human and do their best. Age has nothing to do with it - being capable and responsible does. Also, this article doesn't say the life guard didn't respond - sometimes anything is too late to save a person. She 'was' breathing and had a pulse when pulled out. It's just so sad.

  • lee0908 Jun 12, 9:40 a.m.

    I got a third-hand story that said the girl was swimming under the diving board and a boy jumped in directly on top of her, the girl did not surface.

  • T-Man Jun 12, 9:32 a.m.

    Prayers to her family and friends!

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