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State closes probe of NCSU bus driver's death

Posted May 11, 2012

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— The state Department of Labor has closed its investigation of a North Carolina State University campus bus driver who died after complaining of fumes on the bus she was driving, officials said Friday.

Joann Sewell, 50, died Dec. 17, three days after she stopped the Wolfline bus she was driving and asked a man on the street to call 911.

Sewell's daughter said her mother had complained of fumes on her bus but that dispatchers told her to continue with her route.

An autopsy report released two weeks ago said Sewell died of pneumonia, and there was nothing in the report tying her death to carbon monoxide.

An investigation by the state Division of Occupational Safety "found no evidence of carbon monoxide exposure," Dolores Quesenberry, spokeswoman for the Department of Labor, said in a statement.

The department closed its case and didn't issue any citations to First Transit, the Cincinnati-based company that operates the Wolfline buses, Quesenberry said.

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  • Lamborghini Mercy May 11, 2012

    long haul - And I suppose you have a medical degree to back up your accusations.

    No, what I said was actually just common sense stuff... But I'm must admit I have do have couple of degree's to back up to my statement.

  • long haul May 11, 2012

    "Truck/bus drivers, forklift operators, or anyone working near such equipment are exposed to levels of carbon monoxide."
    So I guess that means we need to be extra careful on the roads expecting truck/bus drivers to be collapsing left and right due to carbon monoxide.
    "The fact they found "no" evidence of a person chronically exposed to carbon monxide only proves they are either lying, incompetent, or both."
    And I suppose you have a medical degree to back up your accusations.
    I am sorry for the family but sounds like she was just sicker than she thought and it caught up with her. The family needs to let go and quit trying to ruin other peoples lives by blaming innocent people.
    Let her rest in peace.

  • NiceNSmooth May 11, 2012

    yeah... expected that

  • Lamborghini Mercy May 11, 2012

    Carbon monoxide exposure can also contribute to pneumonia by allowing the entry of saliva or foreign matter into the respiratory tract. Given the fact that the long-term effects of low-level exposure are under studied these guys decided to stop scratching their heads and call it a day. Truck/bus drivers, forklift operators, or anyone working near such equipment are exposed to levels of carbon monoxide. The fact they found "no" evidence of a person chronically exposed to carbon monxide only proves they are either lying, incompetent, or both. She very well may have died from pneumonia, but what triggered it was the carbon monoxide.

  • charmcclainlovesdogs2 May 11, 2012

    Sewell died of pneumonia, and there was nothing in the report tying her death to carbon monoxide.

    My condolences to the family and friends. The evidence proved its case. There was no carbon monoxide.

  • Ambygirl May 11, 2012

    I remember this story. Many people said at that time it could not have been carbon monoxide poisoning.

    I'm sorry for her family and hopefully this will give them the closure they need to go on.