Michelle Young

Jury selection begins for Jason Young retrial

Posted January 16, 2012
Updated January 17, 2012

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— The second trial for a 37-year-old man accused of killing his pregnant wife more than five years ago got under way Tuesday in a Wake County courtroom with prosecutors and defense attorneys selecting jurors to hear the case.

Jason Lynn Young is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Michelle Marie Fisher Young, who was found beaten to death in her home just south of Raleigh on Nov. 3, 2006.

He was arrested in December 2009 and went to trial in June, but a jury failed to reach a unanimous verdict, forcing a judge to declare a mistrial.

Jason Young murder trial Full trial coverage

During his first trial, Jason Young testified that he was out of town on business when his 29-year-old wife, who was five months’ pregnant with the couple’s second child, was killed.

The state, however, contended that the couple argued frequently and that he didn't want to be married.

He checked into a Virginia hotel on the night of Nov. 2, 2006, and drove 169 miles back to his home, killed his wife and drove back to the hotel, prosecutors claimed.

Michelle Young's sister found her face-down in the couple’s bedroom the next day and also found their 2-year-old daughter unharmed and hiding beneath the covers of her parents’ bed.

Defense attorneys argued that someone else, possibly two people, killed Michelle Young, noting DNA evidence found inside the house didn't match Jason Young.

Jason Young Jury selection in Jason Young retrial begins

There was no physical evidence linking him to the crime, his attorneys said. He didn't have time to commit the crime, and even circumstantial evidence showed that he didn't do it, they said.

Jury selection in Young's first trial lasted 5 ½ days, but Superior Court Judge Donald Stephens has said that he expects it to be several weeks this time because of extensive media coverage.

Opening statements are tentatively scheduled for Feb. 6, and testimony, which lasted 11 days during the first trial, could last as long as six weeks.

Jason Young, meanwhile, is out of jail on a $900,000 secured bond. If convicted, he faces life in prison without the possibility of parole.

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  • dktarmac Jan 23, 2012

    There has been no news over the last week. Does anyone know where this stands in regards to seating a jury?

  • tigresspen Jan 23, 2012

    greenerebecca: It's your prerogative to stand beside Jason but I watched the trial via internet from the live feeds and looked at the 'evidence' presented. I found him guilty as charged. I think he drove home that fateful night and killed his wife and unborn child.

  • greenerebecca Jan 20, 2012

    I want to comment on Dollibug. I am with you on this. I don't understand it, but I don't need to that's between Jason and the sister in law.
    I've Known Jason many years and I don't think he done it. Yes in school he was a goofy person, and very athletic, but he also made alot of friends. Some he still has from where he Grew up. Yes I am one of them. I think instead of people bashing him without knowing him, you should be asking the same questions that we all have asked. WHat can we do to help. Is there anything you need.
    I'm tired of seeing him beeing run through the gutters. It's time his friends stand behind him and let him KNOW WE SUPPORT YOU.

  • justice4my Jan 20, 2012

    Knew both Jason and Michelle...I pray that the jury puts it all together this time. Just because he is a good actor on the stand, doesn't mean he is innocent.

  • tigresspen Jan 19, 2012

    @buford The victim questions are normal questions that both Pros and defense lawyers asks potential jurors. I was asked that question when I was called as a potential juror in a murder trial. Ironically the one where I was accepted was an officer related shooting and I do have family member who was killed by an officer. I was honest in my answer and was accepted as a juror. We were also asked if we or any family member knew or had any dealings with the officer and my answer was yes and explained how.

  • eccgc Jan 18, 2012

    Perhaps there was a valid reason for him doing what he did.... I know from personal experience that an attorney told a person I was sitting next to....that he needed to take the plea deal that was being offered to him....as it would be the "best that he would get"....lousy advice......an innocent person SHOULD NOT accept any kind of plea...needless to say...he did NOT take the plea...and he is NOT using that attorney now...and oh, by the way...he still have NOT taken a plea and so far...nothing has been done...when a person gets in a hard spot...sometimes...they have NO IDEA what they should do...and they might end of making the "wrong choices"...I have no idea why he did what he did...and I doubt that any of us will ever know...there are a lot of unanswered questions...
    dollibug

    dollibug, As AlWAYS, thank you for your insightful comments. It is comforting to know that there are those like you who are interested in "fair and just" trials.

  • Alexia.1 Jan 18, 2012

    I agree with aprilhunter220. As per the 5th Amendment, "... nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb". When a Jury cannot reach agreement, it means there really isn't solid evidence. America's solution? Just keep trying and trying and trying... eventually, prosecutors will get a conviction. In this case, it wasn't like there was just one person on one side with the other 11. I can see a retrial there, but that was not the case here.

  • dollibug Jan 18, 2012

    ++++The thing I can't get past, is if he had nothing to do with the murder, how could he sit by and choose not to show up for the civil case (thus losing custody of his daughter)?
    NCnewsreader

    Perhaps there was a valid reason for him doing what he did....
    I know from personal experience that an attorney told a person I was sitting next to....that he needed to take the plea deal that was being offered to him....as it would be the "best that he would get"....lousy advice......an innocent person SHOULD NOT accept any kind of plea...needless to say...he did NOT take the plea...and he is NOT using that attorney now...and oh, by the way...he still have NOT taken a plea and so far...nothing has been done...when a person gets in a hard spot...sometimes...they have NO IDEA what they should do...and they might end of making the "wrong choices"...I have no idea why he did what he did...and I doubt that any of us will ever know...there are a lot of unanswered questions...

  • jackcdneh1017 Jan 18, 2012

    To people who say "if you are innocent, you have nothing to fear" (about talking to the police or prosecution) please educate yourself about wrongful convictions in the United States. 279 exonerated and counting. Ask Darryl Hunt, Alan Gell or Greg Taylor if they think you have nothing to fear. The naivete of your average citizen is truly disgusting. And you are the people who find themselves on juries deciding a person's fate? Heaven help us.

  • aprilhunter220 Jan 18, 2012

    THERE SHOULDN'T HAVE BEEN A SECOND JURY SELECTION TO BEGIN WITH. I HOPE THEY GET IT RIGHT THIS TIME.

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