Education

Slowing student growth could cost Wake schools

Posted December 15, 2015

Map Marker  Find News Near Me

— The Wake County Public School System, the largest in the state, is growing more slowly than predicted, and that could mean a budget blow for schools.

The Board of Education meets Tuesday afternoon with student enrollment projections and the third-quarter budget forecast on the agenda.

According to the published budget, Wake public schools enrolled 155,184 students in 2014-15 and spent an average of $8,856 on each. Over the past five years, the student population has grown by about 13 percent while per-pupil spending has been on the decline.

With student population growing more slowly than expected, the board could see their state and county budget allotments do the same.

District officials that, although more children are being born in Wake County, fewer families are choosing to send their children to public schools. The district's portion of students in the county is down more than 2 percent since 2011. Private schools, charter schools and home schools have seen gains.

Wake County officials estimate that the district has lost about 1,000 students to charter schools.

12 Comments

Please with your WRAL.com account to comment on this story. You also will need a Facebook account to comment.

Oldest First
View all
  • Doug Smallen Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    Education of the kids is not a business for profit, less kids should mean more money per child.

  • Roy Hinkley Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread



    That's how the system works. Public schools are publicly funded.

  • Dean Logan Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    "Over the past five years, the student population has grown by about 13 percent while per-pupil spending has been on the decline."

    Wouldn't it make sense that if the budget can't increase at 13% to match the population increase, then funding per student would decrease?

  • Dean Logan Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread


    Yet the parents of those 2,100 students are still paying taxes that goes to funding those schools. The cost of teaching those students is removed from the schools and that money goes towards the remaining students. Sounds like a win for WCPSS.

  • Sam Adams Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread


    Unfortunately this is true. Its sad to see what passes for investigative reporting at WRAL these days. WRAL is right there with the AP which is nothing more than a propaganda machine at this point.

  • BigWillie Johnson Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    Could this be that Hispanics realize that Trumps rise to power is due to their unchecked immigration and the American citizen is fed up with it, and they are now, not considering coming to America? I am just saying! American birth rates for whites are declining and the increase among African Americans has been slowing. We are building these schools due to immigration.

  • Jon Brabender Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    Definitely think the report could use some work..."student population expected to take a dip"??? Really...going from +13% school population growth to a - Negative population growth? Or are they saying the rate of growth is slowing?
    A real reporter would include some facts, but then again...this is WRAL...facts interfere with spin.

  • Jim Hinnant Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    View quoted thread


    I guess it's time to ban all private, home and charter schools. Gotta make sure the little scamps get a proper state/county-run edumakayshun - and that tax money continues to flow, unabated.

  • Angel Nardo-Myers Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    Perhaps the loss of students should prove to WCPSS that they should focus on educating students and not indoctrination. The revisionist teaching by teachers and political correctness is the real on people are pulling their children out of public schools

  • Roy Hinkley Dec 15, 2015
    user avatar

    The numbers in the article are not the issue, I think the issue lies with reading comprehension.

    1000 kids lost to charter schools may only be 0.6% of their latest enrollment, but the article explains that the 2% drop was due to charter, private, and home schools all making gains. The implication is that roughly 2,100 students were lost to private and home schools.

More...