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  • Cherrie Fausnaught Sep 1, 12:51 p.m.
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    Because everyone buys milk and bread when there is an emergency such as hurricane or winter storm.

  • Skye Thompson Sep 1, 8:33 a.m.
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    I've only been driving for half as long as you have but I agree! It's the same pattern of greed!

  • David Fleenor Aug 31, 11:36 p.m.
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    What's a milk sandwich...

  • Norman Lewis Aug 31, 11:09 p.m.
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    From what I have heard, only maybe 10% of refining capacity is affected. We have a large supply of refined gasoline already in storage and available for distribution and the reduction in refining capacity is expected to be very short lived and the pump price is jumping immediately. The cost of the gas already in the underground tanks at the gas station did not change. I could understand an increase in pump prices when the distributor starts charging the retailer
    more per gallon but an immediate change sounds like profiteering at the expense of the public to me. Any incident like this is only an excuse for the gas companies and retailers, to jack up prices instantly and lower prices very slowly over weeks even though the nominal excuse for raising prices may have ended almost as quickly as it started. I have been driving for over 40 years and have seen the same pattern for decades.

  • Allison Blanchard Aug 31, 10:48 p.m.
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    Stoooooop. You're going to make the middle age people buy gasoline like they buy milk samdwiches. Christ almighty.

  • Eric Rothman Aug 31, 6:13 p.m.
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    Now people will run out to the pumps to Top Off there tanks exactly against what you are told not to do!

  • Skye Thompson Aug 31, 5:24 p.m.
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    Yes, but there are exceptions. If a governor declares a State of Emergency, for example, then the cap on hours of service is waived. the law stipulates that "Even though safety regulations may be suspended, drivers and carriers are expected to use good judgment and not operate vehicles with fatigued or ill drivers, or under any conditions presenting a clear hazard to other motorists using the highways states have done the same." You can learn more at https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/emergency

  • John Smith Aug 31, 4:56 p.m.
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    I guess I understand the intentions, but I thought max hours behind the wheel was a Federal mandate? Personally, I can't do more than 6 behind the wheel without feeling the affects...but I'm not pulling 90,000lbs. Do you really want a gasoline tanker rolling down 85 or 95 with the driver on fumes physically/mentally?

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