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  • ILoveDowntownRaleigh Nov 5, 7:21 p.m.

    It would appear that these new voucher systems and charter schools (brainchild of our Republican general assembly) are already becoming extremely expensive to the North Carolina taxpayer!

  • krimson Nov 5, 4:14 p.m.

    Interesting. Kinston Charter Academy is considering suing the state for $200k "after employees were not paid for work they did before the school closed down."

    The Charter School had a debt of $347,000 in 2007, has been delinquent in payments back to the State, could not pay its teachers properly. And now that the school has shuttered its doors, its trying to sue the state so the principal (paid $10k in August) doesn't get strung up the nearest tree...

    And the RWers would say that Charters need NO state oversight, right WEIN???

  • krimson Nov 4, 9:50 a.m.

    What happened to the $600,000 given the Kinston Charter Academy this year??? They close early in Sept. after accepting the money... Any investigation there??? Thank goodness the Principal for said school got paid $10k for unused vacation time in August...

    What say you WEIN???

  • krimson Nov 4, 8:32 a.m.

    WEIN: "Charter and Private vouchers could have provided ample room and completely eliminated bury the taxpayers in more debt and causing a massive property tax increase."

    What part of "Charter schools are public schools, serving public students with public dollars for the public's benefit" do you not understand??? Moving to a Charter system does nothing to alleviate the tax-payer burden. It only means the tax-payer has no oversight, via an elected school board, in how the schools are run.

  • 3rd Order Synechdoche Nov 3, 5:09 a.m.

    "Why would ANYONE be against a wide variety of educational opportunities for children?"

    Smart question.

    I support Charter Schools, but I agree Charter Schools can unfairly benefit wealthier families. Because Charter Schools often do not offer breakfast, lunch, bussing, or special ed services, lower income families with a greater need to use these services have a hard time making Charter Schools work. Funding per child is flat, but the cost per child in public schools tends to be higher, so the reallocation of money to Charter Schools can leave the public schools underfunded to the needs of their students.

    We need to find a way to make Charter Schools work, but some of the criticisms of some the Charter Schools in some of our communities are reasonable. Where Charter Schools do create problems for public schools, we need to take action to correct those problems so that both kinds of schools succeed.

  • ltcjlb Nov 2, 10:20 p.m.

    I believe facts speak for themselves. At Southern Wake Academy where I taught for 5 years we achieved higher test scores than many of the Wake County High Schools. We are a small school.
    I learned that some of Wake County's High Schools have more students than did whole counties in many parts of the state of North Carolina. For 7 years I taught in a District in Colorado which had fewer than 1500 students from K-8. Is bigger better. Economy of scale may be a viable tenet of economics, but I question the educational value of many of the large scale districts.

  • superman Nov 2, 7:08 p.m.

    I worked in a charter school several years ago. We never had a single visit from anyone. The school was poorly organized and a total lack of referernce or resource materials. Sometimes our best reference was last years newspapers and magazines. It was a total failure for the teachers and the students as well as wasted money. It was just a money making business. Public schools may not be that great but they a lot better than charter schools. And home schooling is even worse. Very few parents if any as well as teachers can provide instruction on every subject in every grade 1-12. Parents who send their kids to charter schools or home school do their children a great injustice.

  • miseem Nov 2, 4:40 p.m.

    My guess is you will say more money, more debt, more unionized teachers, more schools, and you will TOTALLY ignore what these successful countries have done to improve education.
    Pseudonym.

    Well, since NC has about the lowest pay nationwide for teachers, no teacher's union, lots of classes in trailers and about the lowest state contribution of funds per student, most of your argument makes no sense. However, most other countries do do show a lot more respect for educators than the typical poster on this web site. Think that may have something to do with it? Also, you seem to be making a lot of claims about these other countries doing so well. What specifically are they doing that we are not? Or is your post just your unsubstantiated opinion?

  • itsyoureternalsoul Nov 2, 2:23 p.m.

    How are exceptional children with IEP's doing at charters? Oh, they don't have any? Well, that saves a LOT of money

  • quadrathlete Nov 2, 11:37 a.m.

    There needs to be better accountability of the current Charter Schools. They are not held accountable to any level now from what I have experienced.
    Honesty first

    What school is not accountable?

    Want a successful charter school story? Magellan.

  • rachel Nov 2, 9:31 a.m.

    Public schools are afraid they will lose their captive audience to other options and their top heavy over paid management will lose their jobs. I have had my kids in two charter schools and they enjoyed it, did well and I have never regretted it. They were able to have better field trips because they weren't required to submit plans for one and explain its educational relevance. All things that bog down public schools. BTW-it was only the public high school I got called from to say there was a gun toting shooter in the cafeteria-didn't happen at the charter school. I think people who attend and support charter schools have one things some of those attending public schools do not-they actually want to be in the classroom. If we could eliminate the numbers of students "just there because the law says they have to come"-all schools would have motivated kids to teach and good reasons to come to work. Charter schools have the kids/parents who want an education-

  • jackaroe123 Nov 2, 6:51 a.m.

    If we don't have the money for practically anything else in this state, how could we have money for massive charter school expansion?

  • BlahBlahBlahBlahBlah Nov 2, 6:10 a.m.

    Public = "One Size Fits All"

    Charter= "Let's find the right size"!!

  • BlahBlahBlahBlahBlah Nov 2, 6:09 a.m.

    I like this!!

    "At Southern Wake, the school day is built to give students time for volunteer work and outside jobs required by the school's program"

    Why can't every school be a charter school and throw the useless common core out the door??????

    Seems to me this young man from Southern Wake is getting more real world..

    When any person has to hire a plumber, a construction worker, a mechanic, a landscaper, etc etc...they understand how the public schools are failing...

  • wonderland Nov 1, 11:55 p.m.

    I went to a charter school and I loved it. My grades improved from the one on one help. I did not like the big public schools I went to. Way to many issues that they refused to fix. Charter schools are also great for people who have hearing issues and other disabilities. The smaller classes and fewer students, We all knew each other and didn't judge one another for things. We all got along, I cannot say the same for the bigger schools i attended. If not for the charter schools I would not have graduated.

  • tracmister Nov 1, 10:04 p.m.

    Pseudonym, the successful countries give teachers more time for planning, hold parents accountable (something that's foreign to the United States), and have one system that recognizes that not every child will go to college and therefore doesn't test every child with the ACT like North Carolina does. (This would be a waste of your money) However, since you wish to want facts, the 5 states that don't have collective bargaining or unions tare ranked in the bottom ten including this state. The other ten states that ban unions have nine in the bottom twenty-five. However, I am not advocating more money, but these are the facts. Again, charter schools are not the solution.

  • Pseudonym Nov 1, 7:17 p.m.

    tracmister,

    Why don't you enlighten us as to how to improve American education.

    My guess is you will say more money, more debt, more unionized teachers, more schools, and you will TOTALLY ignore what these successful countries have done to improve education.

  • tracmister Nov 1, 5:32 p.m.

    Charter schools, when you look at the numbers closed you will notice that not one was for academic failures even though multiple charter school test scores were consistently worse that the surrounding schools.

  • tracmister Nov 1, 5:29 p.m.

    We are trying to compete with the world to better educate our kids. Which top ten countries in education use charter schools? Can't name them because they don't exist. Only New Zealand and the United States have charter schools because other countries have figure out the correct way to improve education and it isn't charter schools.

    Another Grand waste of taxpayer money.

  • tracmister Nov 1, 5:27 p.m.

    thewayitis Be careful what you wish for. There is no adequate way to monitor and on-line charter school. Virtual school for North Carolina is a blessing and a curse. If you get a good instructor, you in heaven. If you don't, there's not dime one you can do about it.

  • stymieindurham Nov 1, 5:05 p.m.

    Common Core is about as useless as bussing.

  • thewayitis Nov 1, 5:02 p.m.

    I really wish NC would allow online charter schools. I know there is something in the works, but who knows when it will be approved. Many other states have done this successfully -- why does NC always have to be one of the last states to implement something like this?

  • Honesty first Nov 1, 5:01 p.m.

    There needs to be better accountability of the current Charter Schools. They are not held accountable to any level now from what I have experienced.

  • Mo Blues Nov 1, 4:58 p.m.

    Why would ANYONE be against a wide variety of educational opportunities for children? I'm pro-choice!

  • whatelseisnew Nov 1, 4:40 p.m.

    "So, for example, his math teachers had to learn on their own how to implement new Common Core math standards. "

    Whats to learn? Little Billy, how much is 8 + 4. Little billy replies, UMMMMMMMMMM 11. Say Billy how did you decide that 8 + 4 was 11. Well..... I have 8 Fingers and I have 3 toes so that is 11. Now we understand common core.

  • whatelseisnew Nov 1, 4:36 p.m.

    "This calculation is controversial – and the subject of several lawsuits – with school systems say they're ceding tax dollars they can't afford and charters suspicious they're not always getting what they're due."

    Yeah the Greedy school systems ever fearful of any kind of competition. Gee an 800+ million dollar bond. Charter and Private vouchers could have provided ample room and completely eliminated bury the taxpayers in more debt and causing a massive property tax increase.

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