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  • CharmedLife Sep 19, 2013

    The father is very, very, selfish, and he does care about anyone else's kids, just his own! A five year old will do just fine playing in the backyard with friends. SELFISH!

    NOT selfish! Just being a concerned parent. Why don't you try using your own advice? You're the one who's being selfish and heartless.

  • A person Sep 19, 2013

    The Y has the right to deny services to anyone for any reason they find fitting.

  • heathershissler Sep 18, 2013

    I find it difficult to believe that they YMCA does not have ONE staff member with this capability. Self centered parent? Anyone who makes that statement clearly has lived a more charmed life then the rest of us. Sounds like the YMCA needs to actually read the ADA guidelines. People get sick. People have medical issues. Grow up and follow the law.

  • meltonjohnny27 Sep 16, 2013

    Father of type 1; please visit here for more help if needed: See http://www.diabetes.org/advocate/get-legal-help.ht​ml

  • 678devilish Sep 16, 2013

    saving technique

    Very good comment. How can people do this to a child? What if it was your child being turned away from the YMCA?

  • chicnrdu Sep 16, 2013

    So for everyone stating that they think asking the Y staff to provide a child with a life-saving shot is asking too much, does that mean you don't expect the YMCA lifeguards to jump in and rescue your drowning child. I mean CPR is also a life saving technique that the Y trains and certifies their lifeguards in.

  • Madonna Sep 13, 2013

    I think we should get Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor involved with this case. She definitely needs to read some of these posts!

  • jacamoe Sep 13, 2013

    None of this would've been necessary if one of two things happened: 1. WCPSS allowed the child to attend a school with after-school care that already takes care of T1D students. 2. The Y stepped up and got the FREE training to take care of a T1D child, which so many wonderful caregivers do every single day. Other WCPSS after-school contractors do it. Only the Y refuses, and they hide behind the fact that they are a religious institution, which they wrongfully believe exempts them from the ADA.

    TWANGnBANG
    September 11, 2013 7:21 p.m.
    A to the M to the E to the N ........ BINGO

  • Mon Account Sep 13, 2013

    "You guys are dead wrong. Where in the story does it say the child is disabled? It talks about the ADA but NEVER once says the child is disabled. I am not slamming the child because he has a "disease" that is unfortunate but I do slam the father for taking this to the level he has, it's uncalled for and he needs to make other arrangements. He is also putting the Y in a spot and they are not and should not be made to adhere to his wishes alone.

    The Y is not an employer of this "child" therefore they don't have to make reasonable accomodation. Read what "winemaker81" inserted.

    I think you people have taken this to the most ridiculous level and that's exactly what this man wants."-PDMARTIN

    I'm sorry if you don't like the facts. But saying that we are dead wrong on the disability part just because you don't like it doesn't invalidate the reality of the situation. ADA. Federal law. I know it gets stuck in your craw but, hey, it's the way it is.

  • 678devilish Sep 13, 2013

    The YMCA would NOT be

    If the YMCA cannot serve ALL children then maybe they should close forever.

  • 678devilish Sep 13, 2013

    SO, do you have ANY idea what it costs to send a child through the various YMCA child care programs?

    I don't care about the cost. You should be like me and have compassion for ALL kids regardless of health issues. What if it was your child. This same child could come into your life to help you. What would you think of that?

  • Krimson Sep 13, 2013

    mom2two: "I am so sorry that this disease cripples a child's sense of normalcy and ability to participate at the same level 100% of the time with other children."

    Umm, I think its YOU that thinks he is not normal, and doesn't have the ability. Not him. Don't project your own deficiencies onto this child...

    Frankly I'm stunned and appalled that a mother of two would support a Christian organization, when it states that it would rather not serve a child, than be bothered to institute potentially life-saving procedures for its patrons...

  • parrothead73 Sep 13, 2013

    Wow so many comments and so many uninformed people... I have a son with Type 1 who has been in YMCA after school and Track out since kindergarten. The YMCA has NEVER denied us access to any of their programs (I believe the YMCA is being grossly misrepresented). We understood the policy about not administering glucagon (which unlike an Epi pen is an open hypodermic needle where an epi pen is a concealed auto injector where the administrator is not exposed to an open needle). We made accommodations by keeping cake gel and glucose gel in his supply bag knowing that the Y would use that if needed, call EMS and provide EMS with is glucagon injection. Cake gel and glucose gel can both be used on and unconscious patient to raise blood sugar until EMS arrives. Injecting glucagon although not difficult does pose more danger to the people administering it then and Epi Pen due to the fact that it is an open hypodermic needle. I wouldn't want to inject another child.

  • LesterDexter Sep 12, 2013

    The YMCA of the Triangle generates revenues in excess of $60 million per year. The CEO’s annual salary is $300k per year. Their After School Program is highly profitable, especially with a labor pool that is predominately teenagers, not having to serve meals and using school space. It would serve the children and the public better if WCPSS would competitively bid their After School Program to contractor that would provide the best care at an affordable price. And at a minimum, they should enforce that the contractor meet all local/state/federal laws.

  • lori27605 Sep 12, 2013

    cont'd

    And you need to educate yourself on the Americans w/ Disabilities Act-because diabetics are included.

  • lori27605 Sep 12, 2013

    PDMARTIN:
    “I'm so sick of people saying "I have a right", "he has a right". No you don't. When are folks going to wake up and be responsible for themselves. Society has gotten into an "entitlement" mindset and want everything for nothing. This man should go out and research and find alternative care for his son or better yet take care of the child himself.”

    PDMARTIN is getting all bent out of shape and he’s not even comparing apples and oranges. He throws around words like “entitlement” and “wanting everything for nothing.”
    We’re not talking about someone ripping off the system for welfare, food stamps, etc. WE’RE TALKING ABOUT GIVING A KID A LIFE SAVING SHOT!!! If you’re out in public and have a heart attack, would you not want someone to do CPR? And if you say yes, then does that make you “entitled” or “wanting everything for free”? See how your comparison makes no sense? And you need to educate yourself on the Americans w/ Disabilities Act-because

  • marbec Sep 12, 2013

    For all of those folks saying that the father should have found other daycare options- he did try. He had a daycare willing to accept the child near Frances Lacy school and requested a transfer. Unfortunately, WCPSS denied the transfer but instead offered the choice of two schools both with daycare programs administered by the YMCA. Again the YMCA is the problem here and needs to adjust.

    Link for story: http://abclocal.go.com/wtvd/video?id=9216996

  • TWANGnBANG Sep 12, 2013

    PDMARTIN's comparing T1D to nearsightedness or tennis elbow shows the need for the ADA in the first place.

  • Krimson Sep 12, 2013

    PDMARTIN: "Endless"

    Then take it up with your Congressional Representative...

  • TWANGnBANG Sep 12, 2013

    Also, the courts have ruled that providing care for a diabetic child does not constitute an "undue hardship" under the ADA.

    The Y has been relying upon the ADA exemption for religious institutions (oh, the irony). However, as a contractor for the WCPSS, this exemption does not apply. The DOJ has already one two cases against other Ys in this exact situation, which is why the Y of the Triangle is now backpedalling on this.

  • TWANGnBANG Sep 12, 2013

    The ADA specifies diabetes as a disability for purposes of the law. It is right there in the legislation itself.

  • PDMARTIN Sep 12, 2013

    TribalCane60 Wrong again, you can have epilepsy and have a seizure which could be life threatening but no a disability.
    Why do you people keep making this child disabled when it has not be stated for fact that he his??????

  • PDMARTIN Sep 12, 2013

    You guys are dead wrong. Where in the story does it say the child is disabled? It talks about the ADA but NEVER once says the child is disabled. I am not slamming the child because he has a "disease" that is unfortunate but I do slam the father for taking this to the level he has, it's uncalled for and he needs to make other arrangements. He is also putting the Y in a spot and they are not and should not be made to adhere to his wishes alone.

    The Y is not an employer of this "child" therefore they don't have to make reasonable accomodation. Read what "winemaker81" inserted.

    I think you people have taken this to the most ridiculous level and that's exactly what this man wants.

  • Mr. Middle of the Road Sep 12, 2013

    I think asking Y staff to all be able to give a 'life saving shot' is asking too much. Thats a lot of liability. He could make after school care fo others unaffordable.

  • Mon Account Sep 12, 2013

    Who says this child is disabled? Diabetes is a disease yes but not a disabling one. Has the child been deemed disabled? There is a huge difference between a disease and a disability. I can have heart disease but not be disabled. - PDMARTIN

    Who? ADAAA. Federal law. The basics. A little common sense, too. Here, from diabetes.org:

    While most of the problems with coverage occurred in the workplace, the revised definition of disability applies everywhere that federal disability laws apply including day care centers, schools, hotels, restaurants, concert venues, correctional institutions, and public transportation.

  • TribalCane60 Sep 12, 2013

    PDMartin, yes, you can have a heart disease and not be disabled. However, the glucagon is an emergency only situation. The child will die without it. Now, if you have heart disease and people say they refuse to administer cpr in an emergency situation, would you say "oh, I don't have a right to be here because no one would save my life." Also, will the YMCA administer an EPI Pen shot for severe allergic reactions? Will they help a child with a severe asthma attack? Hum..how many things would I have to write before one would apply to each and every one of us.

  • Krimson Sep 12, 2013

    PDMartin: "Who says this child is disabled?"

    The Americans with Disabilities Act does...

  • winemaker81 Sep 12, 2013

    I found an EEOC Q&A: http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/diabetes.html

    In this Q&A it says:

    10. Does an employer have to grant every request for a reasonable accommodation?

    No. An employer does not have to provide a reasonable accommodation if doing so will be an undue hardship. Undue hardship means that providing the reasonable accommodation would result in significant difficulty or expense. If a requested accommodation is too difficult or expensive, an employer still would be required to determine whether there is another easier or less costly accommodation that would meet the employee's needs.

    I can't say this applies directly, but the EEOC interpretation says that undue expense is a valid reason to not do it. I expect it mimics the ADA wording.

    If anyone spots the ADA verbiage, please post it.

  • winemaker81 Sep 12, 2013

    "Every child should have the right to attend the YMCA. No child should be treated differently because of health issues." -- 678devilish

    No one has a "right" to attend the Y. It is a service for a fee.

  • PDMARTIN Sep 12, 2013

    Who says this child is disabled? Diabetes is a disease yes but not a disabling one. Has the child been deemed disabled? There is a huge difference between a disease and a disability.
    I can have heart disease but not be disabled.

  • Krimson Sep 12, 2013

    PDMARTIN: "I'm so sick of people saying "I have a right"

    That's fine and dandy, but indeed this child has a Right under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

  • PDMARTIN Sep 12, 2013

    I'm so sick of people saying "I have a right", "he has a right".
    No you don't. When are folks going to wake up and be responsible for themselves. Society has gotten into an "entitlement" mindset and want everything for nothing. This man should go out and research and find alternative care for his son or better yet take care of the child himself.

  • TWANGnBANG Sep 11, 2013

    Every T1D child that I know goes around with a pack of some sort containing everything required for regular and emergency care, including that child's preferred emergency forms of carbohydrate. This usually consists of sugar tabs that are designed for diabetics that chew very easily and dissolve very quickly into the blood stream, and some form of juice. There is no rush to find some random candy or soda or whatever- the sugar needed to treat hypoglycemia is always provided by the parents.

    T1Ds need more than emergency care to manage their blood sugar, though, which means that caregivers do need to learn how to use a blood glucose meter and how to administer insulin according to a chart provided by the parents. As scary as that might sound, it is actually very easy. I've even taught staff at a Spanish immersion school who did not speak English well. Once you do it a few times, you realize it's no big deal.

  • marbec Sep 11, 2013

    To:AirBorne Daddy: You have obviously not been around a Type I diabetic. Simply giving someone hard candy is not the "norm." Some might, but those that I know don't use hard candy. They don't want the risk of choking if the blood sugar is dropping too quickly. Additionally, not all diabetics can recognize the symptoms of low blood sugar. Please read about "Hypoglycemic Unawareness."

    This child is covered by ADA, and quite frankly, I hope that the YMCA quickly realizes this and gets their act together. I can honestly say that I will not contribute to any of the Y programs/fundraising until this is resolved. Their summer programs claim to focus on inclusion but if anything this is exclusion.

  • lori27605 Sep 11, 2013

    arnold - ""My" problem is NOT everyone's problem. Be responsible for yourself and your children."

    So you want to punish a child and not allow him into a program because he has a disease? AND it’s a disease that is autoimmune (meaning there was absolutely NOTHING he could’ve done to prevent from acquiring it). Well, if that’s your stance, maybe we shouldn’t allow kids with any medical condition to join the Y. I sure hope you never have a kid who has a medical condition, seeing how unsympathetic you are.

  • Madonna Sep 11, 2013

    The Triangle YMCA's position on this totally goes against how they are marketing their organization to the public. Their mission statement is to "put Christian principles into practice through programs that build healthy spirit, mind and body for all". They have a corporate partnership with WakeMed and do diabetes programs for children ???

  • DontVote4LiarsCheatsOrThieves Sep 11, 2013

    TWANGnBANG -

    Thank you for that information.

    One would have thought the news stations could have gotten it and reported it so clearly to begin with.

  • TWANGnBANG Sep 11, 2013

    Glucagon is not pre-loaded. You must mix saline with a powder, then draw the mixture into a needle. However, it is still very easy, and you don't need every adult trained on it. Just two would be all that is needed to ensure someone is close at hand to deliver the glucagon on the extremely rare occasion is would be necessary.

    Same with testing blood glucose and administering insulin. You only need one or two people trained. Non-medical caregivers are trained to successfully provide this care every single day in Raleigh, and the training is free.

    Source: My 9yo daughter has been T1D for four years. We've never had a problem with ANY program my daughter has attended like the Y is giving diabetics. Our experience has been quite the opposite- people are generally very happy to get the training and provide the care she needs.

  • DontVote4LiarsCheatsOrThieves Sep 11, 2013

    arnold - ""My" problem is NOT everyone's problem. Be responsible for yourself and your children."

    When a person is disabled, their special needs are covered by FEDERAL LAW!!!

  • DontVote4LiarsCheatsOrThieves Sep 11, 2013

    Seems some need to be more knowledgeable on what's being requested here.

    Here's more about it:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucagon_rescue#Glucagon_.E2.80.98Mini-dose.E2.80.99_Instruction

    Here's how you use it:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jdCsERsYPo0

    It's a disabling disease that is protected by the American's with Disabilities Act.

    An organization can NOT turn it down anymore than they can refuse to put in handicap parking or ramps for wheelchair bound individuals.

  • TWANGnBANG Sep 11, 2013

    Wow. So many wrong assumptions. The Y provides the after-school care as a contractor at the WCPSS school where this child attends. When the Y refused to provide the care the child needed, the dad applied for a medical transfer to a school with after-school care that gladly accepts T1Ds. This was rejected by WKPSS even after several appeals that included the child's MD and the after school care who said they'd take him.

    None of this would've been necessary if one of two things happened:
    1. WCPSS allowed the child to attend a school with after-school care that already takes care of T1D students.
    2. The Y stepped up and got the FREE training to take care of a T1D child, which so many wonderful caregivers do every single day. Other WCPSS after-school contractors do it. Only the Y refuses, and they hide behind the fact that they are a religious institution, which they wrongfully believe exempts them from the ADA.

  • arnold54 Sep 11, 2013

    "My" problem is NOT everyone's problem. Be responsible for yourself and your children.

  • DontVote4LiarsCheatsOrThieves Sep 11, 2013

    Folks, this is just a sugar-type mixture in a premixed preloaded automatic injector.

    The needle is enclosed within the injector.

    You put it to the skin, push the button, and the needle comes out a fraction, injects the solution into the person, and then the needle retracts.

    What risk is there in that???

    It's similar to what they stick you with when you get a simple blood test.

  • DontVote4LiarsCheatsOrThieves Sep 11, 2013

    DeathRow - "You would have to train basically ALL YMCA Counselors that are 18 or older to administer the shot."

    They should all be trained to do that to begin with.

    This is a simple premixed preloaded epi-type pen.

    A child could do it if they had to.

  • DontVote4LiarsCheatsOrThieves Sep 11, 2013

    sendus - YMCA's staff should be trained in basic first aid and that's really all this is. It's a simple pre-loaded epi-type pen, just like they'd have to use for a child with asthma or an allergic reaction.

  • sendusmessage Sep 11, 2013

    As much as I sympathize with the Dad, he's asking them to train their staff to provide out-of-the-ordinary emergency medical care. There is serious liability associated with accepting that responsibility, and YMCAs are staffed with kids mostly...

  • namelesssniper Sep 11, 2013

    And once again we have someone who makes their problem the problem of society. It never ends.

  • PDMARTIN Sep 11, 2013

    678devilish

    Who's going to pay for that training? And when they have to up their rates because of this are you going to whine again because you "can't afford it". It's a never ending cycle, the father should just stop looking for his 15 minutes of fame and find another place for the child.

  • DeathRow-IFeelYourPain-NOT Sep 11, 2013

    678devilish: "So train them. Stop making excuses. This child has a right to attend or else the father should file a lawsuit. That would certainly catch the YMCA attention."

    SO, do you have ANY idea what it costs to send a child through the various YMCA child care programs? Every child has a right? Bologna. If that child's family doesn't have the money, that child does NOT have a right to attend. Its not public school were talking about. Its YMCA child care, which is NOT free. You say, so train them. You obviously don't realize the cost involved to train them and also don't realize the costs involved in liability insurance. The YMCA would NOT be affordable for most kids to attend if we just "train them".

  • PDMARTIN Sep 11, 2013

    678devilish
    Every child should have the right to attend the YMCA. No child should be treated differently because of health issues.

    Yes in some circumstances they should. They Y is not equipped to take on this responsiblity and that child also has to learn a life lesson that not everything is going to go his or her way. Why does this have to be PUSHED on the Y?

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