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  • katiebridgette May 17, 3:33 p.m.

    Interesting to see the split between the "be thankful you've got a job, don't blow it by asking for a raise" folks and those who can see the possibility, see ways that they can list skills that justify a raise.

    Whether you think it is possible or impossible, you're right. With all due respect, put some work into making it possible. Just that shift in attitude might make you more valuable to your employer.

  • OpenM1nd May 17, 1:50 p.m.

    If you ask, the worst that they can say is "No." The key is to be flexible and not stubborn about it. Additional vacation days, days to work from home to save commuting expenses, and other perks like company cars are also negotiable in some cases.

  • joeBob May 17, 1:49 p.m.

    Remember one thing here folks...it costs money to recruit, advertise, hire and train a new or replacement employee. Some employers will tell you the single biggest business cost they have is replacing a good employee. It's not like snapping your fingers. If you are a good worker, good at what you do, you have more leverage than you think.

  • tayled May 17, 1:15 p.m.

    In this job market? Are you kidding? Just be thankful that you have a job at all is my motto. Some bosses, if you were to try to negotiate for a higher salary will tell you that he can hire someone for less and show you the door. It's happened to several people I know.

  • boolittlek May 17, 1:13 p.m.

    I work in a corporate environment, at a company with 600-700 employees. Performance reviews and merit raises are handled at the same time for all employees. Senior managers are given a base percentage with which to work, and it's at their discretion whether to give their subordinates more or less than the base (as long as the team average equals the base). There's no negotiation with the merit raises; they're based on performance.

    On occasion an employee's duties change significantly, and he or she can argue that the position should be classified at a higher level (with an accompanying raise). But even then that's not a manager's call--the decision goes through multiple levels of HR and senior company administration.

  • whatelseisnew May 17, 12:05 p.m.

    "I highly doubt any of the current comments except Davids are based upon fact, number one, only in a good job market do you have any power to negotiate, bad job market the employer has all the power currently, we are in a Bad job market. You have to however "Sell yourself" some are very good at it , most others are not"

    Generally true, but never 100 percent true. It depends on the demand for the skill set.

  • whatelseisnew May 17, 12:04 p.m.

    "It's even more amusing to watch others come on and declare that they never have to negotiate because employers are beating their doors down."

    Why is that amusing. Yes in today's environment Employers can seek to obtain any employee for the lowest possible cost. However, depending on the skill set, a person can be in a possible where they have skills that happen to be in high demand even though there is not robust hiring going on. I wonder how many on here bother to research what the given salary range or hourly rate is being offered before they apply for a job. Except for my first couple of part time jobs that were low-wage and also low-skilled required jobs, I knew going in exactly what I was willing to accept. If the employer would not match what I wanted, then I moved on. My former employer went through many types of hiring swings, from almost zero hiring to massive hiring and even throwing in sign up bonuses to new hires.

  • TimeWillTell May 17, 11:17 a.m.

    The nay-sayers here clearly do not understand the timing of negotiation, at least for professional or high-tech jobs. In the early stages of applying for a job, the employer does indeed have all the power, and the applicant is just another resume in the pile.

    But once the hiring manager has decided on the person they want to hire, the power base shifts somewhat. Hiring, especially for professional or highly-technical jobs, is difficult for the majority of managers, so, once the manager makes a decision, he/she has made a commitment and wants to close the deal quickly and move on.

    That is the time to negotiate - after an offer has been made.

    I speak from experience. I retired from one well-into-6-figure job at the height of the recession and was hired into a new one within a few months. I also coached a stay-at-home mom who applied for a part-time job; she negotiated an hourly rate 12% above the original offer. Interviewing and negotiating are valuable skills to have.

  • JustAName May 17, 9:20 a.m.

    Always fun to watch someone in academia tell those out in the real world how things work.

  • SouthernPackerFan May 17, 8:24 a.m.

    I highly doubt any of the current comments except Davids are based upon fact, number one, only in a good job market do you have any power to negotiate, bad job market the employer has all the power currently, we are in a Bad job market. You have to however "Sell yourself" some are very good at it , most others are not.

  • issymayake May 16, 6:49 p.m.

    Exactly what is there to complain about in this story. . oh . .I see yall have found something already. *sarcasm*

    My next job will pay me at a minimum 15K more. I'm not budging for less than that.

  • davidgnews May 16, 5:39 p.m.

    Negotiate a raise, are you kidding? Maybe if you're 'air talent,' but certainly not in any jobs where I've been.....you got what you got!

  • whatelseisnew May 16, 5:35 p.m.

    This is putrid. I never had any anxiety. Either I would accept the offer or not. END OF STORY. I never took a job where I was offered less than I wanted to get.

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