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  • handwritingrepair Feb 26, 4:51 p.m.

    It is odd that — so far — the legislators clamoring for cursive are almost all Republicans. (Doesn't the Republican party portray itself as the champions of minimized government, of minimal regulatory interference in education and elsewhere? Why, then, urge government control over handwriting?)

    It is even odder that the documents the cursive clamorers most often name (as their evidence that we need to write cursive style for the sake of reading it) are the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. Some material in each document — the Constitution's "We the People," for instance — is penned, not in cursive, but in elaborate "Olde Englishe" Blackletter. Yet no legislator crusading for a cursive writing mandate (on the grounds that we need to read our founding documents) is crusading also for a mandate of Blackletter.

    Someone who has never seen cursive handwriting does, almost always, need to be taught to read it — because cursive is admittedly far

  • handwritingrepair Feb 26, 4:25 p.m.

    "Jetset" writes:

    > We MUST have the basics: reading, WRITING, and arithmatic!
    /
    How about spelling? /-------------------------------------------------/

  • handwritingrepair Feb 26, 4:21 p.m.

    To all North Carolinians who suppose that printed signatures can't be legal ...

    The UCC 1-201(37) — North Carolina General Statutes § 25‑1‑201(37) — specifies that “‘Signed’ includes using any symbol executed or adopted with present intention to adopt or accept a writing.”

    Further, the North Carolina General Statutes 12-3(10) states, for use in statutes: “Provided, that in all cases where a written signature is required by law, the same shall be in a proper handwriting, or in a proper mark.”

    Admittedly, some folks who Just Feel Sure they law must be wrong on this issue may mentally exclude printed handwriting from the category of “a proper handwriting” — if so, they have not pointed to any legal defense for such exclusion.

  • handwritingrepair Feb 26, 4:18 p.m.

    Cursive's cheerleaders forget thst one can learn to read a style without producing it. (This is fortunate. If we had to write a style to read it, we would have to learn to read all over again whenever a new font was invented.)

    It odd that — so far — the legislators clamoring for cursive are almost all Republicans. (Doesn't the Republican party portray itself as the champions of minimized government, of minimal regulatory interference in education and elsewhere? Why, then, urge government control over handwriting?)

    It is even odder that the documents the cursive clamorers most often name (as their evidence that we need to write cursive style for the sake of reading it) are the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States. Some material in each document — the Constitution's "We the People," for instance — is penned, not in cursive, but in elaborate "Olde Englishe" Blackletter. Yet no legislator crusading for a cursive writing mandate (on the grounds tha

  • busyb97 Feb 25, 1:22 p.m.

    I think people forget and dont realize how much you do use those various skills and subjects in day to day life. We are so used to the process, we forget how we arrived at it. Ie...multiplication tables. The table is irrelevant but the mastery of the multiplication is not! It is something used daily....and those who dont know how, it becomes quite clear to the rest of it. But do you stop and think "I am glad I knew how to multiply today!" Not likely. But you know that you bought 3 gallons of milk for $3 each and need at least $9 to do it!

    Or cursive handwriting.....you were able to read the note your momma left you or the card she sent. Or maybe the precious note from your grandma. Or YOU wrote a note for someone or a grocery list for yourself and rather than printing, because it takes longer, you scribbled out your version of cursive. Bet you dont stop to think about using it...you just do. But your kids wont be able to read any of it.

  • junkmail5 Feb 25, 9:22 a.m.

    The WSJ story suggests ANY handwriting has this effect... so cursive would remain totally pointless.

    Print handwriting, still taught, does the same thing.

    Likewise, your other example, learning another language, would be far MORE useful than cursive.

  • Ebunny Feb 22, 9:49 p.m.

    Cursive trains the brain. My kids are in a classical education school and they begin cursive in 2nd grade. It is like teaching them a foreign language as it expands abstract thinking. Don't get that from keyboarding. Here is a WSJ article that supports it. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704631504575531932754922518.html

  • junkmail5 Feb 22, 7:54 p.m.

    http://davidsortino.blogs.pressdemocrat.com/10036/intelligence-and-the-lost-art-of-cursive-writing/
    thewayitis

    well... a BLOG! that's scientific!

    Especially when his first two "sources" are folks who make their living on cursive writing.... I'm sure they're TOTALLY unbiased.

    Then note he doesn't provide links to the Johns Hopkins one... wonder why?

    Notice his wording- "physical instruction such as cursive handwriting lessons"

    or, a bunch of other physical instructions too...but that wouldn't help his argument so he leaves that out.

    Note the Geiger quote ALSO stops without any actual mention of cursive, just the author imagining it's among the "such as" examples that might fit what the guy is saying.

  • junkmail5 Feb 22, 7:50 p.m.

    Hardly! If you can get college credit for calligraphy, cursive writing should at least be taught in grade school to make kids more well rounded.
    timexliving

    this makes no sense.... grade school is for basic, fundamental, pillars of education.

    Not wasting time on dead languages.

    Might as well teach semaphore while you're at it.

  • timexliving Feb 22, 7:34 p.m.

    "Which is the point." junkmail

    Hardly! If you can get college credit for calligraphy, cursive writing should at least be taught in grade school to make kids more well rounded.

  • thewayitis Feb 22, 7:28 p.m.

    junkmail5 -- here ya go!

    http://davidsortino.blogs.pressdemocrat.com/10036/intelligence-and-the-lost-art-of-cursive-writing/

  • junkmail5 Feb 22, 6:39 p.m.

    So is Japanese and Chinese caligraphy. But these classes are taught at the college level for credit.-timexliving

    but not in standard grade-school.

    Which is the point.

  • timexliving Feb 22, 6:35 p.m.

    ""cursive" (an antiquated, outdated, useless type of script)" junkmail5

    So is Japanese and Chinese caligraphy. But these classes are taught at the college level for credit. In America you'll have a greater chance of using cursive writing than caligraphy.

  • timexliving Feb 22, 6:19 p.m.

    "Typical conservative thinking; let's force schools to teach requirements in things that are no longer in use." Bendal1

    Just because you don't use multiplication tables at your fast food, drive through job, doesn't mean the rest of us don't. Multiplication is at the core of all mathematics that follow it. You can't do trigonemtry or calculus without it. Those are two branches of math that make our high tech society possible.

  • junkmail5 Feb 22, 5:34 p.m.

    So many brain processes develop when one learns to write old-fashioned cursive.-thewayitis

    If that was posted to Wikipedia it would have [citation needed] right after it.

  • thewayitis Feb 22, 5:23 p.m.

    Wow, there are a lot of cursive haters. Must have failed handwriting, LOL. BTW, handwriting was the only subject for which I got a bad grade in elementary school. Still, I think handwriting and cursive are very important. So many brain processes develop when one learns to write old-fashioned cursive. If schools would bring back cursive in early grades, I bet we'd see a lot fewer diagnoses for dysgraphia, dyslexia, etc with huge cost savings in school budgets.

    The educated people in the world are still learning to write cursive, memorizing multiplication tables, and yes, learning Latin. Go check out your nearest elite, expensive, private school.

    While I can understand why some may think cursive is not important, it boggles my mind that anybody thinks that kids shouldn't learn multiplication tables. Until one memorizes basic math facts, one will never be able to advance in math. Memorization of math facts allows for speed in solving problems.

  • Bendal1 Feb 22, 4:36 p.m.

    Typical conservative thinking; let's force schools to teach requirements in things that are no longer in use. When will they start requiring horseback riding and how to split a rail, too? How about how to make a buggy whip? Cursive handwriting is no longer needed for anything; if the concern is "omg computers may fail us one day" then teach printing; at least everyone else can read that.

  • zenonx6 Feb 22, 4:11 p.m.

    If I don't print you can't read it.. And obviously pathetic people care about frivolous things and never seek a higher mindset.

  • junkmail5 Feb 22, 4:07 p.m.

    My thoughts exactly, all the sheep who think that is an impossibility are drinking too much koolaid. Handwriting is a necessary tool,
    Offshore

    Not sure what you yourself are drinking, but you seem to have confused "cursive" (an antiquated, outdated, useless type of script) with "writing"... a skill still taught in schools.

    Likewise, they still teach reading in all schools... just not in Latin or other dead languages.

    But again- if your best argument is something like "If an EMP takes out all electricity we'll need to be able to write loopy letters" your argument is pretty terrible.

  • Offshore Feb 22, 4:03 p.m.

    LOL...power grid goes down and no one has electricity----cursive comes in real handy..
    original intent

    My thoughts exactly, all the sheep who think that is an impossibility are drinking too much koolaid. Handwriting is a necessary tool,

  • raleighdurham Feb 22, 3:58 p.m.

    what's dumb is that the house things that they are qualified to make decisions like this. let's leave the educating to the educators.

  • OGE Feb 22, 3:46 p.m.

    Let's teach cursive and go away from computers...those things are bad!

    This has got to be one of the dumbest things I have ever seen.

  • wa4mjf Feb 22, 3:24 p.m.

    While I think it should be taught, I have to agree that it is not a requirement for a legal signature. A signature is your mark, it can be just an X or a very fancy cursive rendering. Just need to use whatever it is consistently.

  • robjustrob Feb 22, 3:12 p.m.

    There is nothing more romantic than recieving a true love letter from your sweetheart when you are many miles away in uniform. To be written in cursive, signed and mildly fragrant, nothing can replace this art form. The most technology it takes is a pen and paper (and hopefully, a functioning post office). Forget e-mail, video, chat. The handwritten letter, even from a pen pal, is a remarkable treasure. There will be plenty of time later to learn to read between cold, machine printed lines. Let's get the kids going while their minds are fresh before we burden them greater tasks. Oh - and let's have them learn to tie their shoes, too. Hook and loop is fine, but not at the expense of fine motor skills, okay?

  • junkmail5 Feb 22, 3:12 p.m.

    cursive is NOT REQUIRED for a legal signature.

    That is what lazy people think.- charmcclainlovesdogs2

    it's also what people who actually know the law think.

    Apparently you're too lazy to verify that your assumption that it's required is wrong. Go figure!

  • goldenosprey Feb 22, 3:07 p.m.

    "cursive is NOT REQUIRED for a legal signature.

    That is what lazy people think. Go figure!"

    No! that is fact, whether lazy people grasp it or others. I knew a guy with an Anglo name whose legal signature on court documents was the Arabic rendering of his nickname. OMG! I know at least two lawyers who sign pleadings with no more than a circle with a squiggly line.

    And have you seen Sec Treas Jack Lew's siggy? You may not like him because he is an Obama appointee but the Harvard and Georgetown Law grad is no dolt.

  • zenonx6 Feb 22, 3:04 p.m.

    Yep,, They'll be able to link their letters together with curly little lines but will be dysfunctional, mentally disturbed, ignorant , and filled with backward thinking patterns. I'm sure the ability to link letters together with curly lines will serve them much better than some psychological understanding about human nature and abnormal thinking.

  • claytontarheel Feb 22, 2:59 p.m.

    With the exception of my signature which is not really legible, I haven't used cursive writing since I was in 3rd grade during 1972. I can still write in block print and read just fine. The time required to teach a student cursive could be better spent on many other things. Parents that feel it is important to know cursive should teach their own children. Maybe that child can then get a job teaching cursive as an ancient art form.

  • goldenosprey Feb 22, 2:57 p.m.

    "so no one else is concerned that our lawmakers are overstepping their bounds here?"

    I am, but this is hardly the most egregious trampling of rights these days.

    " cursive writing teaches more than pretty writing. It teaches discipline and attention to detail."

    ANY writing assignment taught properly should do that, without resorting wasting class time on antiquities.

  • charmcclainlovesdogs2 Feb 22, 2:44 p.m.

    cursive is NOT REQUIRED for a legal signature.

    That is what lazy people think. Go figure!

  • jdecoskey Feb 22, 2:27 p.m.

    Cursive writing and multiplication tables are great, but personally I'm in favor of teaching the children in school to THINK. Chances are that my 8 year old is not going to get through school not knowing multiplication, but if she doesn't learn how to read between the lines and take what knowledge she is given to make an educated decision it won't matter if she can write a letter in pretty penmanship, because she'll just be saying what everyone else is telling her she should say.

  • junkmail5 Feb 22, 2:24 p.m.

    Everyone in this day and age should know how to cursive write. Some where along the line you will have to sign something in your adult life- charmcclainlovesdogs2

    and as at least 3 different people have already explained in this thread, cursive is NOT REQUIRED for a legal signature.

    Perhaps instead we should teach reading comprehension, since people keep bringing up this totally wrong point without having read the last several times their error was pointed out?

  • themacs Feb 22, 2:24 p.m.

    The purpose of both printing and writing your name is to ensure that the name can be read. Many signatures are illegible. A printed signature would be no less unique than a cursive one. Individuals can create their own signature from any style of writing.

  • themacs Feb 22, 2:19 p.m.

    False dichotomy.

    There are more choices than just "cursive" and "x."

  • charmcclainlovesdogs2 Feb 22, 2:18 p.m.

    Who is writing a check???

    I still write check because I do not have a computer not do I trust to put certain information on them. I don't have to do what everyone else is doing regardless if it is 2013. But one thing is for sure, some where in your life, you will have to sign your name. Printing your name is not the same. A first grader can do that.

  • Scubagirl Feb 22, 2:12 p.m.

    "What century are you from??? What child today has a checkbook?? Who is writing a check??? Good lord.... I am willing to bet that mult. facts are still being taught today. But, the cursive?? Waste of time! exteacher"

    Certainly is a good thing that you're an EX teacher!!!!!

  • charmcclainlovesdogs2 Feb 22, 2:05 p.m.

    Everyone in this day and age should know how to cursive write. Some where along the line you will have to sign something in your adult life. There is a difference in printing and writing your name. You don't want to put an "X" to stand for your name.

  • themacs Feb 22, 1:59 p.m.

    No. The Common Core requires multiplication and division fluency under 100 by the end of third grade - two years earlier than this bill.

    If the sponsors of the bill were familiar with state curricula, they'd know that.

  • raleighdurham Feb 22, 1:57 p.m.

    so no one else is concerned that our lawmakers are overstepping their bounds here?

  • Wiser_now Feb 22, 1:51 p.m.

    "add ... back learning the multiplication tables. "

    Did they really stop teaching multiplication tables?????

    And - cursive writing teaches more than pretty writing. It teaches discipline and attention to detail.

  • junkmail5 Feb 22, 1:49 p.m.

    LOL...power grid goes down and no one has electricity----cursive comes in real handy..
    original intent

    You can't write in regular print without power?

    Hint: When your only argument in favor of something is this silly you should probably give up your argument.

  • ncteacher22 Feb 22, 1:47 p.m.

    Hallelujah! Finally some common sense!

  • No Party Affiliate Feb 22, 1:44 p.m.

    Cursive writing is an art form like calligraphy. As a communication tool, cursive writing was abandoned because of its vast variation and ability to become misunderstood. The majority of English communication takes place in type or block print, which is very difficult to misunderstand. All technical documentation is written in block print, in order to avoid any mistakes which could occur with cursive writing.

  • themacs Feb 22, 1:35 p.m.

    This debate is symbolic of the overall debate going on in our country. Are we going to long for a return to the "good ol' days" (only good if you were a part of the groups that weren't discriminated against)or are we going to adapt to a changing world? Everything moves forward; fighting to hold on to the past never has never succeeded. We'll adjust quickly or learn our lesson slowly and painfully, but the world will move forward.

  • delta29alpha Feb 22, 1:34 p.m.

    Heh Heh...After that EMP bomb goes off you'd better be able to write and do math without any electronic aids.

  • original intent Feb 22, 1:32 p.m.

    LOL...power grid goes down and no one has electricity----cursive comes in real handy..

  • goldenosprey Feb 22, 1:23 p.m.

    "Excellent!!! Kids need cursive writing. If you can't write it, you probably can't read it. It's a disgrace for Americans not to be able to read their own Constitution. Those complaining are probably too lazy to put pen to paper. " samjwebb

    Terrible! No one besides honey_pot needs cursive writing. And once and for all, you don't need to write it to be able to read it anymore than you have to be able to render Times New Roman or Courier to read it!!! When Americans read their own Constitution they read a typed version, they don't go to Archives in DC to sit there and read it. You don't need to know ancient Greek or Hebrew or Aramaic to read a Bible!

    It's embarrassing we are even considering this. It is local school district business if they want to perpetuate pastoral living. Next the Honorables will want to teach kids to type on Underwoods with ribbons and white-Out.

  • themacs Feb 22, 1:15 p.m.

    http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/creating-new-government/resources/two-versions-preamble-constitution-1787

  • jaydosse Feb 22, 1:14 p.m.

    Please!!!We need cursive writing. I dread the day when a computer crashes and someone starts scribbling notes in the office using bold printed letters on post it notes!! Eliminating cursive writing is the equivalent of stripping away a part of ones unique personality.

    CURSIVE WRITING NOW AND FOREVER!!!!!

  • themacs Feb 22, 1:09 p.m.

    The Constitution was not written in cursive! And even if it were, they have digitized it and made it widely available. IF you have ever read it, you must have read it in that format yourself, since you weren't aware the original was in cursive.

    I am constantly amazed at how people have no qualms about posting something very judgmental without having a cursory knowledge of the facts of the matter.

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