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  • Cary Progressive Feb 20, 4:01 p.m.

    "This is something positive from Gov. McCory. This helps people who want to work acquire skills to get jobs -so needed. Good job on this one in my opinion by the governor. -freebme"

    Don't worry, it won't be long before the guv doubles your sales taxes gives that money to the corporations and the rich in tax cuts.

  • marsupial75 Feb 19, 1:14 p.m.

    "The college kids had snotty attitudes and were hard to manage." Bubbba

    While I commend you on your success without a college degree, two things: 1. Employers in various industries do expect college degrees of their employees in this day in age, for better or for worse. 2. I resent your implication that college graduates are basically brats. I worked hard for my degrees, and I know many, many others who do/did as well and continue to work long, hard hours in their jobs. It's not fair to demonize college graduates based on such a gross generalization.

  • marsupial75 Feb 19, 1:06 p.m.

    Crumps Br0ther, liberal arts is an entirely distinct concept from a liberal political ideology.

  • Grand Union Feb 19, 1:00 p.m.

    ""Even with the fifth-highest unemployment rate in the nation, I still talk to employers – even here in Randolph County – who say they can't find qualified employees to fill our job openings."

    Thats simply an indication that they are offering to little pay to attract people to the industry.....companies want skilled labor but are not willing to pay much more than minimum wages to get it.

  • free2bme Feb 19, 12:24 p.m.

    This is something positive from Gov. McCory. This helps people who want to work acquire skills to get jobs -so needed. Good job on this one in my opinion by the governor.

  • Crumps Br0ther Feb 19, 11:38 a.m.

    How about working your way up? Should everyone be paid the same amt of money regardless of their career path? Come on people.....seriously?
    Sweets01

    In our culture of instant gratification the notion of "paying your dues" is as alien as "personal responsibilty"

  • tnowen Feb 19, 11:26 a.m.

    My son is in his last semester at NC State University and will graduate in May with a Tech Ed Teaching degree. He plans to go into private industry BECAUSE; teachers pay too low, very few pay increases, long hours. He teaches all day, grades papers and prepares lessons for three 1.5 hour classes each night. He has to be at the school before 7:00 am and doesn't get home until 5:00 or 6:00 pm due to working with the students who have requested help or meeting with student or parents. He spends his weekends grading papers and catching up. Private industry pays so much better. Gov. McCrory should look into that problem as well.

  • dontstopnow Feb 19, 11:24 a.m.

    This is a good thing for the youth of NC, especially those that want to work but do not either want to go to college or cannot afford it.

    As far as skills, I was an artist and after winning an art contest at my school won 6 weeks of art lessons by two local artists, but art would not have paid bills or kept food on the table. I still paint, love to do portraits, write, design clothes and many things related to my love of art, but in the real world, I work like everyone else for my paycheck.

    So no matter what your love is, that does not mean you cannot excel at something else and continue to keep that love close to you and once you retire, enjoy it. :)

  • Crumps Br0ther Feb 19, 11:16 a.m.

    And let's not forget that our governor has liberal arts degree which led him to being governor.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxx

    And yet liberals hate him.

  • Sweets01 Feb 19, 11:07 a.m.

    How unfortunate that ideas to try and help people who are not necessarily interested in a 4 yr college education better themselves is met with ridiculous comments about how much the CEO wants to pay them. How about working your way up? Should everyone be paid the same amt of money regardless of their career path? Come on people.....seriously?

  • xxxxxxxxxxxxx Feb 19, 10:58 a.m.

    "I do have to agree we need more skilled trades people. The problem is, the $500+k CEO of the manufacturing plant only wants to pay them less than $10/hr."

    The plumber that came to my house recently certainly made more than $10/hour!

    I agree that not everyone is cut out for a university degree and there is no shame in being a plumber, an electrician, a welder,a truck driver, etc. We need all of those. But as someone else said, let's not demonize those who choose a 4 year degree. And let's not forget that our governor has liberal arts degree which led him to being governor.

  • burnhace Feb 19, 10:24 a.m.

    It is important that schools prepare students for the jobs that are available today, but also be aware that those young students will have to compete for the jobs of tomorrow unless a strong welfare state will provide for them when their skills become obsolete. That said, the three pillars of business -- lying, cheating, and stealing -- will never become obsolete.

  • wildpig777 Feb 19, 9:47 a.m.

    seems to all point to a total FAILURE BY THE NC EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM to me...

  • Crumps Br0ther Feb 19, 9:39 a.m.

    do have to agree we need more skilled trades people. The problem is, the $500+k CEO of the manufacturing plant only wants to pay them less than $10/hr.
    NewToMe

    we should be lucky that we have any manufacturing here as it is. Manufacturing will come back to the US eventually but it will be done by robots. So there is your tip, plan accordingly. Ive already made in-roads into robotic maintenance technology. They are going to need people to fix them.

  • NewToMe Feb 19, 9:30 a.m.

    I do have to agree we need more skilled trades people. The problem is, the $500+k CEO of the manufacturing plant only wants to pay them less than $10/hr.

  • Rebelyell55 Feb 19, 9:23 a.m.

    I guess things have changed over the years. I thought something like this was already in place. But it good that kids can start earlier on skills that business look for, but they'll still need to have strong math, writting skills in any technical vocation.

  • Crumps Br0ther Feb 19, 8:14 a.m.

    Learn a trade, get some skills. The demand for degrees in 15th Century Hungarian Lesbianism isn't in high demand right now.

    Yes you can pursue your passion but also pursue something that is going to get you a job so you can feed yourself.

  • wigi Feb 19, 8:13 a.m.

    Hmm that's useful. Good idea though to keep him away from the important stuff.

  • Mousey Feb 19, 2:37 a.m.

    "I truly didn't know there was no vocational training in HS any more. How very shortsighted."

    Except there IS vocational training in high schools. It doesn't happen in some very rural places because teachers can be difficult to find for ANY subject, but as a former student and current teacher, I can attest that "no vocational training in HS" as a blanket statement is patently untrue.

    Also, when I was a student my school system had a partnership with the local community college, where kids could take classes during their last year to prepare either for university OR vocational training. It's still going now. And I didn't come out of a relatively well-funded district like Wake either.

  • jackjones2nc Feb 18, 9:50 p.m.

    Amazing to read people believe it's necessary to demonize a college education in order to support technical education. Perhaps someone could better explain these are not mutually exclusive?

  • superman Feb 18, 8:31 p.m.

    I think the gap that we need to fill is letting employers know about the thousands of people who are looking for work. Perhaps they could kinda lower their standards and give people a job who want to learn and to work. What about "on the job" training Gov?

  • superman Feb 18, 8:30 p.m.

    Whatever happened to the federal money for Vocation Education? Did they forget that or have they ended it. The Feds provided money for vocational education when I was going to school years ago.

  • bubbba Feb 18, 6:21 p.m.

    I majored in life. No degree and a lot of hard knocks. I managed to retire at 50 with 3 homes paid for and a mil. in investments. While all my college buddies were out partying and hanging at the ski slops I was driving a truck. I worked hard for what I got with a little luck here and there. The mess they teach kids now I was always looking for kids without college degrees when I was running a business. The college kids had snotty attitudes and were hard to manage. Always jumping from one job to another for a dime more.

  • timexliving Feb 18, 6:04 p.m.

    I'd take a 2 year technical degree in machining over a 4 year degree in liberal arts any day. In this economy the former will give you good chances of finding a decent paying job. With the latter you can work at the local mall and move back in with mom and dad.

  • Terkel Feb 18, 5:39 p.m.

    I truly didn't know there was no vocational training in HS any more. How very shortsighted.

    I do like this though: "The new law also makes it easier for people with certain skills become teachers by eliminating some of the requirements and certifications typically required to become a teacher." Competition's a good thing. Some teachers, like every profession, could benefit by feeling someone coming up on them and about to overtake them. Might even lead to some new ideas in the classroom.

  • jurydoc Feb 18, 5:35 p.m.

    Gee, thought that's why we have a system of 58 community/technical colleges across the state? If only we could get high school counselors to STOP seeing referral/recommendation to those colleges as less than ideal, perhaps more students could find their way there. What a concept.

  • tracmister Feb 18, 5:29 p.m.

    I'll give him credit. That is the first bright idea for education I've heard in a long time.

  • Mr. Middle of the Road Feb 18, 5:26 p.m.

    This sounds like a good idea. We need to encourage young people to consider becoming skilled tradesmen. Just like not everyone is cut out to be a skilled tradesman, not everybody is cut out for a 4 year degree. A good move by the Gov and Rep Tillman.

  • Hippy_mom Feb 18, 4:53 p.m.

    Bartmeister, I'm guessing you mean Bev Perdue.

  • tired2 Feb 18, 4:42 p.m.

    "The new law also makes it easier for people with certain skills become teachers by eliminating some of the requirements and certifications typically required to become a teacher."...would really like to understand this one....Johnny Boy & Goldilocks thought they were qualified

  • fungod12000 Feb 18, 4:30 p.m.

    Who was BETTY Perdue?

  • Bartmeister Feb 18, 4:24 p.m.

    If Pat stops right now, he's done more good for NC than Betty Perdue did in 4 years. I don't think I will ever forget Betty Perdue.

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