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  • Lightfoot3 Feb 18, 9:23 a.m.

    "I know people will hop me for saying this..." - miseem


    And you were right! In today's society, no good deed goes unpunished. But don't let that stop you. While it may be obvious, I still use cases like this and others to drive the point home and use as an example. There are still people that don't follow the law, or basic safety rules. Maybe the more times they hear the obvious, it might finally click and be put in practice. Keep on posting!


    "Miseem really? The article says it all! Why the need to further say anything except....the entire situation is very sad." - claudnc


    So we can't tell from the article that "the entire situation is very sad"?

  • claudnc Feb 15, 7:44 p.m.

    Miseem really? The article says it all! Why the need to further say anything except....the entire situation is very sad.

  • jackflash123 Feb 15, 7:12 p.m.

    Yeah, we know. And this story makes it obvious enough that you don't have to use this opportunity to rub it in.

  • raleighlynn Feb 15, 7:10 p.m.

    miseem, you are right, of course, but as always, hindsight is 20/20. What a horrible thing to have happen. And thanks to the Barefoots' daughter for knowing CPR and doing her best to save a life. CPR is NOT hard to learn, and you might save lives. I have.

  • miseem Feb 15, 6:40 p.m.

    I know people will hop me for saying this, and I am sorry for the death of a child and serious injuries to others, but child seats and seat belts save lives and reduce injuries. Some accidents are unsurvivable, but getting thrown out of a vehicle at 50 MPH does not improve your odds. Despite what your cousin/friend/co-worker says about being saved by not having a seat belt on. A few people have survived jumping from a plane without a parachute or a malfunctioning parachute, but I would not recommend that either. Buckle up, put your kids in appropriate infant or child seats. Make it a habit. Then, maybe even new teenage drivers will do it. And families can go through this less often.

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