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  • downtowner Feb 11, 7:45 p.m.

    It takes a lot of guts to do what he did. Especially when you are supposed to be infallible. My grandma is also 86 and we still can't get her to give up her DL even though she is blind as a bat and can't remember which pedal is which anymore. I wish she could take a hint from the Pope and just pass that torch on to someone else...

  • Ken D. Feb 11, 7:37 p.m.

    "econdly, only the Cardinals are able to be Pope, thus leaving out Bishop Burbridge OUT."

    Not so. Only cardinals can vote for a pope, but technically, there is no requirement that they vote for a cardinal. In fact, unless the rules have changed, I'm not sure there is even a requirement that he be a priest, much less a bishop. He just can't be female.

    It's hard to imagine that happening today, but in the Middle Ages the papacy was as much a political job as a spiritual one.

  • discowhale Feb 11, 7:27 p.m.

    All this time I have been secretly hoping for our very own local Bishop of Raleigh to step up and take over in March. His work in NC has been incredible so far; just imagine what he could do for the world as a whole.

    OpenM1nd

    You can't BE serious, can you? That's so riddled with holes it's frightening!

    OM, first off, no one just 'steps up' to be the Pope.

    Secondly, only the Cardinals are able to be Pope, thus leaving out Bishop Burbridge OUT.

    Lastly, if you are a practicing Catholic, you really need to get someone to explain the 'workings' of the church to you.

  • LovemyPirates Feb 11, 7:15 p.m.

    Seems like there would be a better word than "resign." Maybe "step down" or "abdicate" or "retire." Guess it happens so infrequently, there never was a reason to determine what that word would be.

  • NotFromHere Feb 11, 6:36 p.m.

    "...and I don't hold Mary as a subject of veneration" - Relic

    Catholics don't either. But the Bible does say "..From now on all generations will call me blessed" - Luke 1:48

  • OpenM1nd Feb 11, 6:18 p.m.

    All this time I have been secretly hoping for our very own local Bishop of Raleigh to step up and take over in March. His work in NC has been incredible so far; just imagine what he could do for the world as a whole.

  • tayled Feb 11, 6:10 p.m.

    "commanded to be in prayer for him"? Could you please furnish Chapter & Verse for that statement

    Or Ephesians 6:18 "Praying always with all prayer and supplication in the Spirit and watching thereunto with all perseverance and supplicatin for ALL (emphasis added) saints."

  • tayled Feb 11, 6:05 p.m.

    "commanded to be in prayer for him"? Could you please furnish Chapter & Verse for that statement

    Our Lord commanded us to pray for others, even those who hate us, Matthew 5:44. If He commanded us to pray for those who are against us, how much more should we pray for those of the faith? We are to pray for each other always, even if we do not agree with them!

  • nighttrain2010 Feb 11, 5:42 p.m.

    You can and should absolutely have a devout relationship with God without leaving your home to go to any organized Church. - beaulahjackson4

    Well not exactly...

    "I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go into the house of the LORD" - Psalm 122:1

    "For where two or three are gathered together in my name, there am I in the midst of them" - Matthew 18:20

    Yes we are to pray without ceasing and not where men see you. But we are also taught to join in worship of God and minister to brothers and sisters in Christ as well as non-believers so that Christ can be seen through us.

    At one point in my life I was the 'closet Christian'. I prayed as good as I could, tried to live my life well, all by myself etc. But until I rejoined a fellowship I truly had not experienced the blessings I now realize I was missing. There is something good about attending with a group to worship and sing with like minded individuals that can not be gained by oneself.

  • trekkie13 Feb 11, 5:18 p.m.

    tayled stated: "Regarless of how you feel about the man, the Catholic Church, if you are a Christian, you are commanded to be in prayer for him."

    I am a Bible believing Holiness Pentecostal. I disagree with most of the Catholic beliefs and beliefs of the Pope. However, I respect the Pope in that he is looking at the interests for his church above anything else.

  • pappybigtuna1 Feb 11, 5:18 p.m.

    "commanded to be in prayer for him"? Could you please furnish Chapter & Verse for that statement

    Should be thankful to God for the country we have, because there is a group in DC that wants to take that away.

    The Pope had nothing to do with the development of the USA

  • Dido Feb 11, 5:10 p.m.

    Give the man credit for admitting he was not able to continue working in this capacity. How many politicians have we been stuck with year in and year out because they were too proud (or greedy) to give up their office?

  • glarg Feb 11, 5:05 p.m.

    Pretty telling that atheists use the occasion to ladle out more of their hatred.

  • tayled Feb 11, 4:52 p.m.

    Regarless of how you feel about the man, the Catholic Church, if you are a Christian, you are commanded to be in prayer for him.

  • beaulahjackson4 Feb 11, 4:48 p.m.

    Do you mean the changing times like looser moral values, lowering value on human life, and a general morality that changes with the 'times'?""""

    Oh please! I know Atheists that have far more moral fiber than some fundamentalist gay-bashing, high-horsed judgmental so-called Christians in our "changing times". You can and should absolutely have a devout relationship with God without leaving your home to go to any organized Church. I believe Christ compelled us to... "But you, when you pray, enter into your closet and lock your door, and pray to your father who is in secret, and your Father who sees in secret will reward you in public." Mathew 6:6. A lot of people pray several times daily without an audience or boasting about it.

  • downtowner Feb 11, 4:30 p.m.

    over 50% of america is unchurched....they don't have a relationship with God...

    Pot meet kettle

  • nighttrain2010 Feb 11, 4:22 p.m.

    Organised religion institution will fall as it can't adjust to changing times. - nialet

    Do you mean the changing times like looser moral values, lowering value on human life, and a general morality that changes with the 'times'? Because at many points in the past 2000 years the Church has seen those movements come and seen them go. Leaders of the Church come and go as well. Falling away from religion happens in every society, especially as it turns upon itself. But the Church of Christ, Catholic and Protestant, is still standing quite well 2000 years later thank you.

  • lavenderdejectedmoon Feb 11, 4:21 p.m.

    I couldn't agree more nialet.

  • beaulahjackson4 Feb 11, 4:19 p.m.

    I'd love to see all these hateful, intolerant Christian-bashing libs make the same kind of comments about Islam. Actually, I dare them to, but that'll never happen... Hypocrisy is a funny thing"""

    A seemingly very Un-Christian-like and grossly exaggerated stereo-type of Liberals.......hmmmmm you're correct.... Hypocrisy IS a very funny thing.

    I personally was never overly fond of this particular Pope. I adored Pope John Paul II and adored even more Pope John Paul I....I would still like some answers on his untimely and barely explained death.

  • LuvLivingInCary Feb 11, 4:17 p.m.

    with all the negative comments. why should i expect anything different...over 50% of america is unchurched....they don't have a relationship with God...but they know how to judge...

  • LuvLivingInCary Feb 11, 4:15 p.m.

    nialet...after 2000 years i'm still waiting on organized religion to fail.

  • nialet Feb 11, 3:25 p.m.

    Organised religion institution will fall as it can't adjust to changing times. I hope this will only free people's spirits. We don't need institutions to talk to God. God is inside of each person and always been there. With Love.

  • Grand Union Feb 11, 3:23 p.m.

    "I'd love to see all these hateful, intolerant Christian-bashing libs make the same kind of comments about Islam. Actually, I dare them to, but that'll never happen... Hypocrisy is a funny thing. "

    well Islam has no comparable leader......nor has it any real influence on our lives in the west so its not surprising no one on Golo has any real complaints against it. Its just another silly religion and like all religions if its extremists are not kept in check its capable of horrors to match the worst of christianity. However the difference is that in the west we keep religion under tight secular control and so extremism is kept in check to the point that in most of the west, religion is now just the province of the old and the deranged. Those under islam are often not so lucky.....

  • Relic Feb 11, 3:18 p.m.

    "He decided to allow his personal physical suffering and impending death to be a model for others facing the end of their lives." Ken, that's very true. John Paul II was also making a statement against the "assisted suicide" movement that was going on at that time in showing that human suffering is tragic but when dealt with with Grace (divine grace, not "polite" grace) can become a powerful force. John Paul II, while afflicted with Parkinson's disease, still had an active mind. I believe that in addition to the fact that Benedict XVI has become increasingly physically frail that he understands that a modern Pope must be able to travel to the areas of the world in which the Catholic Church is growing the most (Africa and Asia) rather than being physically limited to being cared for as an invalid in the Vatican.

  • GravyPig Feb 11, 3:14 p.m.

    "The Pope is the perfect example of being nothing more than a figure head. DeathRow-IFeelYourPain-NOT Your ignorance of what he is is outstanding. You are a perfect example of someone who speaks with absolutely no knowledge to back up your statements..congrats on ignorance"

    I'm with you DeathRow. Just a figure head.

  • FragmentFour Feb 11, 3:11 p.m.

    Glad to see this particular pope go. He's right - what the Catholic church needs is more than he can give.

  • Thought Criminal WS Feb 11, 3:00 p.m.

    No kidding the media is slamming on the catholic church.

    You don't risk having your head cut off for drawing a cartoon of them... You don't risk having your office exploded for badmouthing them... and you won't see a crowd of angry catholics storm your home demanding blood for pennance...

    In short, the media knows it's proding a cuddly fuzzy plushtoy that won't push back too hard.

    AKA... they are acting as bullies, and they know it.

  • Ken D. Feb 11, 2:31 p.m.

    "As a warrior-Protestant looking at this from a simple historical standpoint, the fact that this Pope had the good sense to resign in face of illness is not to be looked at as anything "sinister" - just because John Paul II's ego and ill-advised stubbornness made him decide to remain a decrepit man in the office is hardly a model to be idealized."

    The Catholic Church wisely leaves this decision to the individual who holds this high office. Pope John Paul II did not decide "to remain a decrepit man in the office". He decided to allow his personal physical suffering and impending death to be a model for others facing the end of their lives. Benedict, while frail, could envision his physical limitations lasting for many years, unlike John Paul who knew his remaining time was short.

  • djhartm Feb 11, 2:19 p.m.

    I'd love to see all these hateful, intolerant Christian-bashing libs make the same kind of comments about Islam. Actually, I dare them to, but that'll never happen... Hypocrisy is a funny thing.

    I hope the Pope feels better.

  • downtowner Feb 11, 2:10 p.m.

    It is refreshing to see the pope take a more business-like CEO approach to running the Catholic church. It's quite simple--If you can't fulfill the obligations of your job then step aside and let someone else who can do the job take over. Very CEO-like of him and I'm sure his shareholders will be pleased with the decision even if the armchair Catholics are shocked. Hopefully the next Pope/CEO will be able to turn this church around and increase the "stock value" of Catholicism. Maybe If we lobby hard enough we can get a real progressive in there.

  • nighttrain2010 Feb 11, 1:55 p.m.

    >>Things have changed in the course of 2000 years where what is in the Bible is no longer relevant to today's environment. When religion can show tolerance over persecution, then I might think about joining the church again. - ALL HAIL ME

    So basically when the Catholic Church fits its theology with whatever you find 'comfortable' or accepting of whatever sin one may be engaged in, you'll join the Church?

    I'm not Catholic and may have problems with some of the Church's theology but that's ridiculous.

    As a Christian I find myself failing almost daily but I doubt going to my pastor to ask him to rewrite the Bible so that I don't continually work towards being a better follower of Christ is going to work. He, and any other pastor that believes God's Word is just that, would laugh me out of the building

  • Relic Feb 11, 1:39 p.m.

    The candidates that have already been talked about long before Benedict XVI announced his "retirement" are an interesting group. Since the last two popes have been non-Italian cardinals there is a good chance that this next papal candidate may be as well. There has been a lot of "buzz" around Catholic scholars that one of the cardinals from Africa and one Mexican cardinal may be in the running to be the first black or latino Pope.

  • Relic Feb 11, 1:26 p.m.

    wildpig777 - Actually, there IS a biblical basis for the early church recognizing the successor to the apostle Peter (who became the first Bishop of Rome) as being the head of the Church. "You are Cephas (Hebrew for "Rock", "Petra" in Greek) and on this rock I shall build my Church...." Because Peter and Paul were both martyred in Rome the seat of the Bishop of Rome became "The Holy See". However, it was not this that inspired the Protestant movement but the office of "priest" and the need for a daily "sacrifice" when the New Testament clearly shows Christ's crucifixion as the one and only perfect sacrifice, the "adoration"/worship of Mary and the Church's corruption on selling "indulgences" that produced Hess, Luther and later Calvin and Knox and the rejection of the infailabily of the papacy.

  • Ken D. Feb 11, 1:19 p.m.

    Pope Benedict is graciously setting a good example for the leadership of his church. It is consistent in every way with the previous change in policy that limits the voting for his successor to Cardinals under the age of 80.

    This decision also underscores the principle that many, if not most, of the Roman Catholic Church's practices are not cast in stone, but are subject to change over time. Such practices include the prohibition of female priests and the requirement for priestly celibacy. I believe, in time, both of these practices will change.

  • harmstrong4 Feb 11, 1:18 p.m.

    I'm sorry,,,but he is supposed to die in office so they can burn smoke until it turns white. God Bless him..now he can go have some fun...play some golf..go fishing, etc.

  • -Va- Feb 11, 1:08 p.m.

    Despite that a lot of folks have legitimate issues with the current pope, I hope that whomever is appointed can clean up and bring an end the entire molestation coverup affair. For once, I would like to see folks have a positive reaction to the roman catholic church. There are a lot of good members of the clergy that are overlooked and ignored because of scandal.

  • Relic Feb 11, 1:08 p.m.

    "This really shouldn't matter nearly as much as it does."

    Why? Whoever sits on the throne of the "Bishop of Rome" is not only the spiritual leader of one of the world's largest Christian churches with millions of members but he's also a political figure as the Vatican City is considered to be a "mini-nation" within Italy. Look at the impact that John Paul II had on world politics (Poland's Solidarity movement, the fall of Communism, reaching out to Jews and the Eastern Orthodox Church, etc.) While I as a protestant do not recognize the "Bishop of Rome" as being "Christ's vicar on Earth" as Catholics do and I don't hold Mary as a subject of veneration the office of the Pope is still one that holds as much spiritual and political impact as the Dalhi Lama or other world religious leaders.

  • raleighdurham Feb 11, 12:45 p.m.

    'Read and interpret the bible yourself!!' Raleigh Rocks 1

    raleighrocks1...you clearly don't know what the vatican II is. please try to be a little more respectful, especially if you don't know what you're talking about. (hint - the second vatican council is NOT the bible. 'read and interpret google searches yourself!' before posting.)

  • Reformed Liberal Feb 11, 12:13 p.m.

    Wishing him well and hope the new Pope changes with with times. Things have changed in the course of 2000 years where what is in the Bible is no longer relevant to today's environment. When religion can show tolerance over persecution, then I might think about joining the church again.

  • more cowbell Feb 11, 12:07 p.m.

    DeathRow-IFeelYourPain-NOT
    Looks as though linespace has some isssues to work through. If he can't entertain the question regarding cardinal authority then I seriously doubt he's as learned as he imagines himself to be.
    No, God won't come down and declare who the next pope will be. Though he may allow the Holy Spirit to intervene on His behalf, would the cardinals be able to interpret the message? Not likely. Priesthood authority is not an assumption or personal declaration.

  • TJPC Feb 11, 12:03 p.m.

    Watching CBS News and it was truly sickening how they kept trying to imply some sort of scandal. That's the problem with the 24/7 entertainment medium that calls itself "news."disgusted2010

    Do you mean other than all of the child abuse cover ups that this Pope and other Popes before him knew about? I think that this is scandal enough.

  • sophiemom Feb 11, 12:02 p.m.

    I think that this Pope had troubles from the beginning. First there was the story that he had been a member of the German "brown shirts" as a young teen (and he was probably compelled to be a member), then the priest sex abuse coverups. He has not had an easy time.

  • djofraleigh Feb 11, 11:56 a.m.

    Not being Catholic, I don't have a voice in this historic event, but I don't know a person of 85 personally who is energetic enough to be holding as important major office, much less as Pope. I'm sure the Pope prayed about this and is using his best judgment for the good of the flock and church. May he enjoy his 'rest' as a Cardinal again.

  • sinenomine Feb 11, 11:56 a.m.

    Papal infallibility, although much older than the nineteenth century, was only dogmatically defined in 1870. Since then a pope has purported to speak infallibly only once - in 1950, concerning the Assumption of Mary.

    To my understanding the Catholic Church has no definitive list of the times a pope has purported to speak infallibly. One thing is certain - the pope does not speak infallibly every time he opens his mouth or orders fries and a coke at the Rome McDonald's.

    For the record, although I find Catholic theology fascinating in its complexity I am not, and never have been, Catholic and frankly find many of the church's tenets to be outlandish.

  • mattcli Feb 11, 11:47 a.m.

    This really shouldn't matter nearly as much as it does.

  • linspace Feb 11, 11:34 a.m.

    The Pope is the perfect example of being nothing more than a figure head.
    DeathRow-IFeelYourPain-NOT
    Your ignorance of what he is is outstanding. You are a perfect example of someone who speaks with absolutely no knowledge to back up your statements..congrats on ignorance

  • linspace Feb 11, 11:32 a.m.

    I struggle with the selection process as an "election" affair. I thought God picks the next pope. Without the proper priesthood authority, what qualifies the cardinals to make this decision? Just the word "election" has political overtones that seems to sterilize the outcome.
    more cowbell
    You need to do some studying then on religious issues.. noone claims that God comes down from heaven and says.."Hey you.. you are the next Pope" There is a process... and if you understood the history of the papacy and beliefs you would not have made this comment. Do some reading

  • linspace Feb 11, 11:29 a.m.

    Wow, I don't remember the last time a pope did not die in office...
    sendusmessage
    That is becasue it has been 600 years since the last one quit

  • Viewer Feb 11, 11:27 a.m.

    TV news is the obvious reason for his decision. Live pictures of a slobbering leader do not inspire confidence. He has good sense.

  • Sumo Vita Feb 11, 11:17 a.m.

    "Wishing him the best in the future! (But also excited about the possibility of a Pope with more liberal interpretations of the Second Vatican Council.)"

    You're a lot kinder than me.. and a lot more optimistic as well. As for the Second Vatican Council, Benedict didn't have a less liberal or more conservative interpretation of it. He wanted to pretend that it never happened.

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