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  • Durhamighty Feb 8, 7:11 p.m.

    I remember driving this newly opened section of 1-40 back in June of 1985, between Hwy 1/64 all the way down to the S. Saunders St exit - hardly any traffic at the time. I remember it being a bumpy ride back then because of the expansion joints between the original concrete slabs.

  • Nothing New Feb 8, 5:48 p.m.

    ITs not to hard to figure ways to minumize traffic headaches if they would just delay this project. 1) they should go ahead and do the expansion of 440 from I 40 to #1 south in Cary to three lanes, already planed but right now after all this. This could take most of the traffic from southwestern wake to the north and bypass southern 40/440. 2) Finish widening Tryon road to 4 lanes from Lake Wheeler to 70/401 in Garner, then southern traffic would have route bypassing the construction. 3) A long shot here finish I540 and toll the whole darn thing to pay for it and parts of #1 &2. Wont elminate all traffic problems, but certainly would help and those projects need to be done anyway.

  • Offshore Feb 8, 3:05 p.m.

    djofraleigh: since this chemical action has been known about since the Depression era. Why didn't the DOT know in the 1980s?

    What they meant to say is no one on the project at the time new what they were doing... I mean, knew of the chemical reaction... yeah that's the ticket.

  • Road-wearier Feb 8, 2:58 p.m.

    Whatever the reason for the project, NCDOT and the contractor have GOT to find a way to keep more than two lanes open. Two lanes will paralyze the south side of Raleigh during rush hours and holidays.

    I've been wondering if it might not simply be preferable to shut the whole thing down for a year and just get it done rather than monkey around with lane shifts and so forth. Indianapolis did a three year project in 11 months by going to total shutdown...

  • Sherlock Feb 8, 2:43 p.m.

    And we still have to pay for it.

  • Wendellcatlover Feb 8, 2:06 p.m.

    Thank God we completed our move to another part of the county just in time to avoid this nightmare. We knew it was coming and tried extremely hard to get the heck out of that part of town so we wouldn't have to travel this road twice a day. This is going to be a MAJOR catastrophe for people in eastern Wake county. I feel for you all!

  • charlesboyer Feb 8, 2:03 p.m.

    Count on the project to take five years longer than they say and cost at least twice what the "estimates" currently are. That's just how it goes with NC road projects, and if anyone believes any estimate that DOT gives, I have bridge for sale in Brooklyn they might be interested in.

  • JDNCSU Feb 8, 1:11 p.m.

    Someone should go check out the new pavement on I540 between US 1 and the airport...the new pavement is rougher and bumpier thant he old surface!!!

  • whatelseisnew Feb 8, 12:25 p.m.

    They really need to carefully review the actions of EVERY engineer that is currently employed with the DOT. Any of them that were involved in this project that made material decisions must be immediately FIRED. There is no excuse for this kind of error. It is not like concrete is a new material used in road construction. Next the supervisors of these people on up to the TOP should be fired, unless they can PROVE they objected to the construction plan based on material choices. It is TIME for some accountability of State employees ACROSS the board, not just at DOT. Then they have the NERVE to change part of 540 (long ago paid for through an add-on fuel tax), to a toll road. All assets of the involved DOT employees should be seized and sold off to help pay for this egregious failure of professional behavior.

  • swst04 Feb 8, 12:15 p.m.

    Actually I thought the 30 life was pretty good for this road, as heavily traveled as it is. How many times has I-540 been repaved now, since it opened (much newer than the road to be rebuilt).

  • That Explains It Feb 8, 11:27 a.m.

    djorraleigh, remember the entire length of interstate north of Wilson that had to be shut down because of defective pavement? This scenario, in all of its pathetic disguises, plays itself out over and over again in North Carolina, but what passes for journalism in North Carolina only reports it as instances. That way, they can always say they report it as they see it (certainly not hiding the facts), while never risking offense to those that held the leash for so long (over 100 years if I recollect). The litany of corruption that is the NC DOT, and that has been a trustworthy slush fund for washing cash for the Democrat Party in North Carolina for so long, isn't going to change because, simply put, no one is going to do anything about it.

  • djofraleigh Feb 8, 11:22 a.m.

    "It's called alkali-silica reactivity, and it's a material defect that we did not understand at the time this project was designed and built," Corley-Lay said Thursday. == comment

    Give us more about that, please, since this chemical action has been known about since the Depression era. Why didn't the DOT know in the 1980s? We need a materials expect professor at NCSU to enlighten us on this $170 million problem, not counting all the repairs over the last 20 years.

    There's a retaining wall somewhere in Wake, I can't recall, where the concrete looks like a mud cracked dry up pond bed...kinda artsy, really. Educate us with some facts about the 'failure of materials,' DOT material standards, and inspections. I'd like to know.

  • djofraleigh Feb 8, 11:02 a.m.

    In 1990, workders at DOT MV were expected to contribute to Democratic campaigns. NC needs a two party system for checks and balances. Let's not let the Republicans do like the Democrats did, for they will, and that's why they wanted power over the purse.

  • djofraleigh Feb 8, 10:59 a.m.

    why not make the company who supplied the defective pavement pay for it. If you buy a product and it proves to be defective, -- COMMENT

    The state sets material standards and does test and measures from the rock quarry & concrete plant to the road bed. The state has that burden now to bear. Remember the bad bridge where I-40/I-540 split that had to be fixed?

    I will not defend the DOT, imbred and politically tainted as it is, for I was a state inspector of materials at the quarry and had state inspectors check grade when I did road grade on Wade Ave to I-40, and high standards were cheated on at times.

    Remember the 5 mile crack in the right lane of I-40 from Cary to Gorman in the right lane of concrete? That was telling. Was it the subgrade, the concrete or some over-weight permits I thought. Well, it seems it was the concrete mixture. So, add salt and snow to melt, and it went into the rebar, which corrodes and chemically expands and explodes the concrete, but this "reactivity" of m

  • That Explains It Feb 8, 10:56 a.m.

    Yep, it's the pavements fault. It's the "pavement" that is "defective." Not the contractor, certainly, God forbid, not the NC DOT. Certainly not. So now all the ignorant citizens of North Carolina, who clearly would swallow this rat trap of an excuse. Nope, nothing to see here folks, just move along, as usual.

  • LibertarianTechie Feb 8, 10:30 a.m.

    Might as well shut down the highway completly and then reopen it in stages as its redone.

  • babedan Feb 8, 9:36 a.m.

    Good ole boy network at work. Hopefully, the new administration will make sure those in the good ol boy network does not receive the work.

  • beaupeep Feb 8, 9:18 a.m.

    And they just finished a bunch of work on 40 from 1/64 to around Jones-Franklin or farther. Are they going to tear up all that new work too?

  • immaannoid Feb 8, 8:34 a.m.

    They need to hang a right on 440 and widen it from Jones-Franklin to Wade.

  • beaupeep Feb 8, 8:34 a.m.

    Please, dougdeep, you're asking for logic to be employed here.

    Why did they tear up 40 from the beltline to the airport, add a 3rd lane and THEN open 540? They could have left it 2 lanes and someone might use the tollroad then.

  • Crumps Br0ther Feb 8, 8:32 a.m.

    10 years ago? Who was in charge and wanted to do this on the cheap?

  • BVFD1602 Feb 8, 8:17 a.m.

    Guess you people can't read. They didn't find the cause until the 2000's. You need to face it, EVERY road will need to be repaved eventually! Thats like getting mad when your car needs new tires...are you going to sue the tire company because they wore out as designed??

  • ConservativeVoter Feb 7, 7:51 p.m.

    Another problem that was self inflicted by NC DOT.

    I travel to a good portion of the states every year and I don't hear about the problems that NC DOT has anywhere else.

    Last time it was defective asphault on I-795. Time before that it was defective cement paving on I-40 in Durham County.

    Absolutely amazing...

  • tayled Feb 7, 7:34 p.m.

    Once construction begins, its goal is to get at least 30,000 drivers to use alternate routes, alternate their work schedules or use alternate forms of transportation to cut down on traffic delays." yeah that going to happen..NOT

    Did anyone take into account the effect this will have on businesses along the route? How many jobs are going to be lost?

  • tayled Feb 7, 7:32 p.m.

    All of this may be true, but if the pavement is defective, why not make

    What I was trying to say was why not make the company who supplied the defective pavement pay for it. If you buy a product and it proves to be defective, you can usually get a refund.

  • TITAN4X4 Feb 7, 7:17 p.m.

    "but the money is available now, and we are not guaranteed that in the future."
    alexsrus93

    As long as there are taxpayers in NC, there will be OUR money for the DOT to throw away. Look at how many times in the past we as taxpyers have repaved all arround the triangle because of foulups like this. I hope they will take this opportunity to widen that area.

  • Rebelyell55 Feb 7, 7:14 p.m.

    Sounds like excuses to me, the first highway number one had material that lasted a long time, was someone cutting corners? I'm betting most likely this actual cost more so they thought they were getting something better.

  • dougdeep Feb 7, 7:14 p.m.

    Why couldn't they wait till the last leg of 540 was completed through Garner?

    They'd probably make a few extra bucks from frustrated motorists taking the toll.

  • tayled Feb 7, 6:58 p.m.

    Another good place to do NCSU Civil Engineering graduate research on experimental road materials would be the new toll road NC-540.

    True. Didn't someone do experiements at one time in taking used rubber and putting into the asphalt? If you have any experience driving our interstates, look at the amount of rubber from blown tires that litter the highways. Why don't we gather it up and use it in our pavement material? It would certainly go a long way in cleaning up the mess too.

  • tayled Feb 7, 6:55 p.m.

    For those of you wanting it to be done at night, the highway has to be torn up down to the dirt (2-3 feet) and completely regraded, stone, asphalt, then concrete. That can not be done in one night. I am a Civil Engineer and after doing some research on this project I can assure that this project needs to be done. It could wait probably 5 more years at the latest, but the money is available now, and we are not guaranteed that in the future. The pavement that will be used this time is the same types of asphalt that is used on I-95 in Georgia. Some of that asphalt has been there for over 20 years and still is performing as if were brand new, with minimal maintenance. If this pavement is installed correctly (RD Roadbuilders will probably be doing it and they do a very good job), the subgrade will last 50 years easily and the surface will have to be repaved about every 15-20 years, which is a long lifespan for pavement

    All of this may be true, but if the pavement is defective, why not make

  • alexsrus93 Feb 7, 6:43 p.m.

    For those of you wanting it to be done at night, the highway has to be torn up down to the dirt (2-3 feet) and completely regraded, stone, asphalt, then concrete. That can not be done in one night. I am a Civil Engineer and after doing some research on this project I can assure that this project needs to be done. It could wait probably 5 more years at the latest, but the money is available now, and we are not guaranteed that in the future. The pavement that will be used this time is the same types of asphalt that is used on I-95 in Georgia. Some of that asphalt has been there for over 20 years and still is performing as if were brand new, with minimal maintenance. If this pavement is installed correctly (RD Roadbuilders will probably be doing it and they do a very good job), the subgrade will last 50 years easily and the surface will have to be repaved about every 15-20 years, which is a long lifespan for pavement.

  • rednek Feb 7, 6:32 p.m.

    I hope they do not use the same contractor that they used on the expansion of I-40 from Wade ave to west of RTP. If they do, the cost will more than double and it will take twice as long since they will do it once and get paid, then tear it up and re-do it; and get paid again.

  • USAF20YR Ret Feb 7, 6:29 p.m.

    Night work is the answer. What a mess this will be during the day.

  • Bob3425 Feb 7, 6:29 p.m.

    "Once construction begins, its goal is to get at least 30,000 drivers to use alternate routes, alternate their work schedules or use alternate forms of transportation to cut down on traffic delays." yeah that going to happen..NOT

  • cushioncritter Feb 7, 6:25 p.m.

    Wouldn't NC-12 on the outer banks be a better place to test experimental road building materials (it needs to be rebuilt at least once a year anyway), rather than the busiest sections of triangle interstate freeway?

    Another good place to do NCSU Civil Engineering graduate research on experimental road materials would be the new toll road NC-540.

    The article does not state that DOT will try this time to use materials and methods that have been proven to stand the test of time. Hopefully McCrory/Tata are not trying to do research on cutting edge road building methods and materials on I-40. It's such a short drive from the NCSU Centennial Campus for the research faculty to drive out and look at their crumbling research projects.

  • joeazar Feb 7, 6:11 p.m.

    the ol' nobody knew...$170M later its fixed, at the taxpayers expense.

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