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  • Deltawar Feb 11, 2013

    Was looking at CarMax for a late model Honda Pilot and found when IO checked the CarFax for these vehicles that all appeared to have been registered in NY or NJ at the time of Sandy. There was no reference in the vehicle data sheets that they had been flood vehicles.

  • Stilllearnin Feb 11, 2013

    why would we contribute data to a national mv data base and then turn around and not use it? And we should trust our government to work for the people?

  • whatelseisnew Feb 8, 2013

    "Seems like Roy Cooper should be prosecuting these people who "clean" the titles."

    Roy should prosecute himself for contributing to the presence of the criminal illegals.

  • whatelseisnew Feb 8, 2013

    "To the person who commented: I know a dealer who cuts the check engine light indicator. He then solders it to the oil light. Why? Because when you start your car the oil light & check engine light both come on briefly."

    The WHY is... you expect to see the check engine light come on briefly and go out. By pulling the needed voltage from the oil light, you get the expected brief lighting of the check engine. However, if a real problem develops that would normally turn on that light, it will not now turn on.

  • PetulantHarbinger Feb 8, 2013

    When we were young and naive about 20 years ago, we bought a 2 or 3-year old used car from a big, name brand new/used car dealer. Car looked very nice, OK price. A few weeks later I noticed that all of the bolts under the front seat were rusted out. That "nice" salesman sure floated our boat. Learned our lesson.

  • whatelseisnew Feb 8, 2013

    So our LOVELY government does nothing to prevent this. Instead they focus on amnesty for criminals and would dearly love to take guns away from the entire population despite the constitution. So in addition to maybe getting a problem car, you might very well die and kill others out on the highway. It is great to hear they raised the speed limit on I540 so people will now run at 79 miles an hour figuring they will not get stopped. Hope they are not driving one of these things. I wonder how many children will die because of this nonsense. Our Government is the biggest danger to our lives.

  • 3TeensGrowinUp2Fast Feb 8, 2013

    To the person who commented: I know a dealer who cuts the check engine light indicator. He then solders it to the oil light. Why? Because when you start your car the oil light & check engine light both come on briefly. People are driving cars purchased from him that have problems they don't know about because the check engine light only comes on when there's an issue connected to the oil.

    WHY ON EARTH WOULD YOU NOT REPORT THIS PERSON?!?!?!?! That's called being responsible! Report him!

  • 3TeensGrowinUp2Fast Feb 8, 2013

    Wow, how will you ever know when you buy a used car with model years 1995-2012 if it was in the darn floods from Sandy?! That's just insane. I guess more people will be buying new cars...wow.

  • lasm Feb 8, 2013

    tedmcneill50: "If NC would check the database as 33 other states do, would this solve the problem here, or at least significantly reduce the chances for this fraud? If yes, shouldn't this law be changed?"

    Sounds like something we should speak to our NC State Senators and Legislators about, huh? Best chance of getting this into law than we have had for some time.......

  • Life-goes-on. Feb 8, 2013

    Seems like Roy Cooper should be prosecuting these people who "clean" the titles.

  • cbrandonwilliamson Feb 8, 2013

    "When 5 On Your Side reported on flood cars 10 years ago, lawmakers called for a national database of car titles. There's not a fully operational one just yet."

  • cbrandonwilliamson Feb 8, 2013

    This would be a great opportunity for our federal government to step in and solve a national problem. . . in 2013 it should not be that hard or expensive to get a database of flood damaged vehicle vins up and running.

  • BBQCreek Feb 8, 2013

    The National Motor Vehicle Title Information System has 33 states that make inquiries before issuing a new title. North Carolina is one of eight states that submits information but doesn't check the database.

    If NC would check the database as 33 other states do, would this solve the problem here, or at least significantly reduce the chances for this fraud? If yes, shouldn't this law be changed?

  • baldchip Feb 8, 2013

    Alot of good cars and parts were crushed in "cash for clunkers"!!

    Remember -that was Obama's trade in program where taxpayers eat millions for Obama's lovely UAW!! Corruption-AGAIN!!!

    Seems like if the insurance cos. wanted top clean this up-they could. But-"follow the money"!! If they can pay aclaim for say $15000, and then sell th car for $5K, their loss is only 10K instead of 15K. Let's talk about unscrupulous insurance companies!!!

    There is plenty of guilt to go around-with little help for the consumer stuck with a flod car!! Sue the dealer-for misrepresentation-AG help them-you have staff attorneys that can help here!!

  • ligonmaterial23 Feb 8, 2013

    Most times when the water is up to the bottom of the door it will brand it flooded and the car will be perfectly fine . On the other hand , being in the towing industry , the smell alone would be near impossible to get rid of , specially one out of falls lake , whew . Boats on the other hand survive quite well if flooded or sank and gotten to in time .
    My service boat sat under for a week in 20ft of water , runs great with all the original electrical still working 3 yrs later

  • hpr641 Feb 8, 2013

    "I think its worth pointing out that most new car dealers avoid these cars and its the little private used car lots and hack shops that sell these junks."
    _______________________

    Really good point - if for no other reason than the well-established dealers just can't afford the potential of such bad publicity. They realize their name recognition would help the story and they'd be labeled as either swindlers or incompetent.

  • tran Feb 8, 2013

    This is systemic fraud. It's organized crime that ought to be dealt with as such.

  • BeenHereSince67 Feb 8, 2013

    Perhaps if the criminals who changed titles back to "clean" were tried, convicted, and sent to Prison for 15 years and had their lives ruined, instances of this crime might decrease. Just a thought.

  • areyououtofyourmind Feb 8, 2013

    I know a dealer who cuts the check engine light indicator. He then solders it to the oil light. Why? Because when you start your car the oil light & check engine light both come on briefly. People are driving cars purchased from him that have problems they don't know about because the check engine light only comes on when there's an issue connected to the oil.

    Sick. I only hope these swindlers are put out of business.

  • hereinraleigh Feb 8, 2013

    We are in the market for a used car, and have been looking for a few months. Being stuck with a misrepresented car has been a big concern of mine. Not all dealers can be trusted, and I'm glad this report is out now before I bought anything.

  • G-Ovlov Feb 8, 2013

    Of course the issue here is not weather or not to buy a "flood"car; but rather not knowing you've paid top money for a misrepresented vehicle. I agree that there are often many salvageable and useable parts and components to be had from a "flood" car.
    Why not sell these vehicles to salvage yards and recyclers ONLY....not to dealers or wholesalers, or other businesses? And destroy the vehicle's title and declare it "un-titleable" or something.
    Also, implement severe and swift punishments for sellers who break these laws. Loose your dealer/wholesaler license, maybe even permanently. Just do it!

    These are just my "country boy," uneducated thoughts; but a solution doesn't always have to be complicated.

  • RUSTYROVER Feb 8, 2013

    I think its worth pointing out that most new car dealers avoid these cars and its the little private used car lots and hack shops that sell these junks

  • Scubagirl Feb 8, 2013

    "In one case, a 2012 Audi A7 – normally valued at $58,000 – sold for $23,700. A 2010 Toyota Corolla also went in seconds for $3,900."

    BUT that's not to the consumer but to a dealer who will then jack up the price even more on defective cars

  • beachboater Feb 8, 2013

    Just another bunch of thieves. They just don't put a gun on you, they let you go to the bank and borrow the money you give them.

  • xylem01 Feb 8, 2013

    Where is that dastardly state Nanny at when you need it?

  • GravyPig Feb 8, 2013

    "Another thought, who doesn't the state the flood is in see that these cars are crushed on site and that the insurance people witness it."

    That's a good idea, but there are a lot of good usable parts still on these vehicles. Most of the non mechanical and soft components can be recycled into the auto salvage networks. Unfortunately the cars tend to stay in tact until parts are requested.

  • GravyPig Feb 8, 2013

    "whats the big deal. Pay for what you get. Reduce Re-use Recycle!"

    What's the big deal? Did you not read the article? What people are paying for is a good car. What they are getting is a large problem and a waste of their money. The only folks getting a deal on this are the ones byuing this direct from auction. After they get cleaned up the cars are being sold like they were never flooded.

    dejr88, the system is flawed and not all damage ends up reported. Did you have problems with the vehicle due to the collision?

  • RUSTYROVER Feb 8, 2013

    I've work for new car dealerships service depts for 35 years and have seen plenty of these types of cars come in and its ALWAYS TROUBLE ! these cars are never ever right and should have been stripped for useable parts not hacked back together by dishonest people and resold to unsuspecting buyers.

  • Scubagirl Feb 8, 2013

    "whats the big deal. Pay for what you get. Reduce Re-use Recycle! surfer"

    The big deal here surfer is one IS NOT GETTING WHAT THEY PAY FOR.

    Good idea emorley26, but the almighty dollar rules!

  • emorley26 Feb 8, 2013

    Another thought, who doesn't the state the flood is in see that these cars are crushed on site and that the insurance people witness it.

  • emorley26 Feb 8, 2013

    Need to put a few of these dealers in jail for 5 years, see if it keeps happening!

  • dejr88 Feb 8, 2013

    The facts could apply to any vehicle, flood damaged, used, etc. When I bought my'99 Durango, we ere told the vehicle checked out fine, etc. Sadly, I was involved in a collision with another Durango (2001)...my air bags did not deploy, nor did the other driver's, and she hit a light pole. We could look up the VIN # and in some way or another there will be unknown facts about the vehicle. Just saying....but putting flood cars back on a lot is wrong.

  • surfer Feb 7, 2013

    whats the big deal. Pay for what you get. Reduce Re-use Recycle!

  • Scubagirl Feb 7, 2013

    With all the new laws being vetted, perhaps THIS would be a good one! But it's all about making a buck regardless of who you hurt!

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