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  • btneast Jan 30, 11:20 a.m.

    A grocery store and some other general retail would go a long way to making downtown more attractive.

    Not sure expecting a large chain grocer to prosper in a downtown setting is reasonable. If its goal is to be in walking distance of its customers, who is going to walk many blocks lugging bags of groceries? Maybe a mini version, or specialty grocers with small footprints.

  • btneast Jan 30, 11:14 a.m.

    Suburbs are subsidized with massive roads that downtown residents had to help pay for. Dense development is the most economically efficient development. Period. Take a math class.

    Hopefully not the same math class you took. Article clearly states there are currently 5,000 people that live downtown. June 2011, Raleigh's population was a little over 416,000. I would say the subaranites outnumber the urbanites by a wide margin. Suburbia, in Raleigh, is clearly paying for downtown.

  • ecreek Jan 30, 8:41 a.m.

    @drjones74

    I see what you mean from your context and I agree there is plenty of parking downtown. I've never had trouble finding a parking spot downtown, ever. However, "dearth" actually means a shortage, not an abundance. FYI

    Downtown Raleigh really does need more retail, and that will likely attract more residents. A grocery store and some other general retail would go a long way to making downtown more attractive.

  • superman Jan 29, 4:14 p.m.

    SubwayScoundrel Guess you didnt read about the building they going to use to attract starving artists. And please dont forget about the convention center they built over the protests of many. Last I read it was still losing money. I worked downtown for many years. Hated even going outside during lunch because of the number of people who were begging and wanted money. Would never have gone there at night and certainly not alone.

  • idontthinkso5 Jan 29, 3:35 p.m.

    People who don't know how to find a parking spot in downtown probably should stay out of downtown.

  • torchhappysean Jan 29, 3:16 p.m.

    "Park in a parking deck. They are free on nights and weekends. By the time you take the elevator down to the ground level and walk to your destination, you've probably done less walking than the average person does in a Wal Mart parking lot."...

    reed..... AND been acosted by 3 homeless people looking for spare change, 4 or 5 drunk yuppies who might or might not be looking for a fight, oh and lets not forget the occasional mugger hiding in the shadows.. Until Raleigh cleans up the neighborhoods surrounding downtown you will be taking your life in your hands every time you visit it at night...

  • SubwayScoundrel Jan 29, 2:54 p.m.

    "Let the free market decide where businesses locate based on the ability to make a profit. I.E. - the Krogers which just closed downtown because they weren't profitable"--Conservative Voter

    At least get your facts straight? The Kroger was not Downtown. It was in the South Side of the city

    Also, private investment has been much greater than goverment investment in DT area in the last 10 years. That is what the article is about and did not mention any government spend on DT

    Amazing what people will make up to try to prove their point

  • reed Jan 29, 2:04 p.m.

    Park in a parking deck. They are free on nights and weekends. By the time you take the elevator down to the ground level and walk to your destination, you've probably done less walking than the average person does in a Wal Mart parking lot.

  • abbync2001 Jan 29, 2:04 p.m.

    I love going downtown after work but hate PAYING to park in the parking decks. Street parking is free after 5:00 but of course is limited.

  • delilahk2000 Jan 29, 1:46 p.m.

    ISN'T RALEIGH EVER GOING TO BE LARGE ENOUGH??????AND THE CRIME WILL GROW ALONG WITH IT.......

  • drjones74 Jan 29, 1:27 p.m.

    Wrong scubagirl. Retail downtown is premised on local residents supporting it who do not need parking. And there is actually a dearth of parking downtown...most decks are less than half full during the day.

  • Bill Brasky Jan 29, 1:19 p.m.

    "If they want more retail, they'll HAVE to do something about parking"

    I don't believe parking is as bad as some people claim. You just have to know where the parking decks are, in relative to where you are trying to go downtown. Of course parking on the street will always be a hassle in downtown. There is not much they can do about that.

  • Scubagirl Jan 29, 1:01 p.m.

    If they want more retail, they'll HAVE to do something about parking!

  • Mr. Middle of the Road Jan 29, 12:35 p.m.

    Why are the liberals and socialists in Raleigh so bent on having a vibrant downtown at the taxpayers expense while most people live and shop in the suburbs.

    ConservativeVoter

    Because a vibrant downtown means an increase in tax base. When you add that to the fact that its cheaper for the taxpayer to maintain services in downtown rather than in the far flung suburbs it means more bang for the buck for tax dollars spent. And the Kroger you mentioned was in the suburbs close to downtown. You are probably right that downtown is not ready for a full scale grocery again yet, but it is coming. Far more money has been spent providing roads, police protection, fire protection etc. for the suburbs than has been spent reviatalizing downtown.

  • drjones74 Jan 29, 12:26 p.m.

    Suburbs are subsidized with massive roads that downtown residents had to help pay for. Dense development is the most economically efficient development. Period. Take a math class.

  • ConservativeVoter Jan 29, 11:36 a.m.

    Let the free market decide where businesses locate based on the ability to make a profit. I.E. - the Krogers which just closed downtown because they weren't profitable.

    Raleigh's downtown has only improved because of government subsidies and tax breaks. Without the government subsidies, the downtown would be just as dead as it was in the 1990's.

    Why are the liberals and socialists in Raleigh so bent on having a vibrant downtown at the taxpayers expense while most people live and shop in the suburbs.

  • Bill Brasky Jan 29, 9:04 a.m.

    Im sure back in the 70s downtown was teaming with businesses. Than developers realized all these new found suburbanites would rather go somewhere more local for shopping and malls were born which was the final nail that destroyed downtowns across America.

    In the last 15 years I've lived here I've seen downtown change dramatically. In the late 90s downtown was just an empty shell that has changed with downtown rejuvenation to attract businesses and nightlife. More people were willing to skip the mall areas and enjoy the real city center. One of the best things they did was remove the pedestrian mall on Fayetteville St. I look forward to seeing what the future holds for Raleigh and judging by the last 10 years it looks bright.

  • lwe1967 Jan 28, 6:21 p.m.

    I remember back in the 70's when the downtown was teaming with businesses and people shopping while the stores were open. The busses ran up and down Fayetteville Street and stopped at every corner. Sir Walter Chevrolet was downtown also. The cornerstone was Belk Lindsey with the restaurant. There were teams of other stores downtown also. I worked at Carolina Trailways and everyday they ran a bus uptown at noontime. We had an hour to do a little shopping, get something to eat and get back on time. Every Friday, there was a fish fry at some Church or another and the day old bakery was down the street. Everyone was always very happy and you didn't have to worry about people trying to rob you and pick your pocket. I do believe people were more civil then!

  • mmtlash Jan 28, 6:15 p.m.

    Yay!

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