This story is closed for comments. Comments on WRAL.com news stories are accepted and moderated between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Oldest First
  • free2bme Jan 22, 5:40 p.m.

    kermit60- I am a minority and I did not get any special scholarships or special priviledges for being so. Actually I had to do more than others to even get a chance. One of my college roommates found out my race and told me that she has never lived with anyone of another race. She then told me that she was moving out. She stayed there one day and then moved in with someone of her own race. As it turns out she and that person did not get along and we later had a class together. We studied together and actually she got along better with me. That is only one incidence of prejudice I have had to deal with in my lifetime out of many. So kermit60, you have no clue and no idea. I was never given anything because of my race other than mistreatment. You really are talking without knowing truth. The sad thing is that people like you are a part of the problem and probably will never change.

  • kermit60 Jan 22, 2:51 p.m.

    free2bme-treat others like you want to be treated regardless of what they look like?
    Yes I would. I would like the special preferance for being a minority. I would like the to take advantage of the scholorships and tuition assistance set aside for minorities only. I would like to scream "hate crime" but I can't because I'm white. I would like to have a race card to throw every time things don't go my way, but again I'm white. I would like to see an NAAWP but that would be considered racist. Maybe a white actors guild or Ms White America. How about an Ivory magazine or white actor awards. Possibly a white entertainment television or a white congressional caucus. Seems to me there are many things that are unfair or unequal. The question is who is being treated unfairly.

  • free2bme Jan 22, 10:15 a.m.

    Some of the comments here ring clear that there is so much more work to be done. Dr. King's dream of equality for all people regardless of race, gender, nationality has not been realized and that is very clear from some of the negative/divisive comments below. Some people will never change I guess but hopefully the younger ones can catch hold to what the right thing to do is-- treat others like you want to be treated regardless of what they look like.

  • trekkie13 Jan 21, 7:16 p.m.

    What I find amusing also is fellow conservatives who buy hook, line and sinker to use an old expression that MLK would have been a Republican conservative today. MLK would probably be one of Obamas biggest supporters on political issues today.

  • wildpig777 Jan 21, 7:11 p.m.

    i think we should have a Jefferson Davis day, he sacrificed so much for my heritage and others in nc.

  • trekkie13 Jan 21, 7:07 p.m.

    issymayake stated: "Yeah MLK was pretty liberal. So was Jesus. Both were martyrs for their cause because of evil men, and the lack of interference from just men.

    But if that's what you reduce anyone's total person to. . liberal or conservative, I truly pity your lack of introspection."

    Jesus was neither conservative nor liberal. Also, from a moral stand point MLK was no Jesus. The fact of the matter is that many of the views of MLK were socialist which is in direct contradiction to the founding principles of our republic. Of course that has been conveniently whitewashed and overlokked by the liberal establishment that has elevated MLK to idol status.

  • wildpig777 Jan 21, 7:07 p.m.

    Yeah MLK was pretty liberal. So was Jesus. Both were martyrs for their cause because of evil men, and the lack of interference from just men. -- issy

    thats blasphemy whether you know it or not. i find personally insulting.

  • issymayake Jan 21, 6:38 p.m.

    Bartmeister,

    Very true statements. America isn't quite there, and will probably never be there. But I am glad, and proud, that we are much, much better for the civil rights movement, and the contributions of Martin Luther King and many others to America's moral compass.

  • issymayake Jan 21, 6:35 p.m.

    Actually, the schools do not teach the truth but rather the politically correct version of him. With each passing year more and more Americans are coming to the realization that this is nothing but a liberal politically correct holiday that has made an idol out of someone for lack of a better term.
    trekkie13

    Yeah MLK was pretty liberal. So was Jesus. Both were martyrs for their cause because of evil men, and the lack of interference from just men.

    But if that's what you reduce anyone's total person to. . liberal or conservative, I truly pity your lack of introspection.

  • Bartmeister Jan 21, 6:34 p.m.

    I can remember my mother saying horrible racist things about Dr. King in front of our maid atheistswillrule

    ================================

    And at that time it was a widely accepted point of view. The same with my grandmother. I don't fault that generation for their beliefs, it was how they were raised and what they knew. But I don't and didn't hold such anger towards my grandmother for it. And we didn't even employ blacks like your family did.

  • issymayake Jan 21, 6:28 p.m.

    It has played havoc with our domestic destinies. This day we are spending five hundred thousand dollars to kill every Vietcong soldier. Every time we kill one we spend about five hundred thousand dollars while we spend only fifty-three dollars a year for every person characterized as poverty-stricken in the so-called poverty program, which is not even a good skirmish against poverty.

    Not only that, it has put us in a position of appearing to the world as an arrogant nation. And here we are ten thousand miles away from home fighting for the so-called freedom of the Vietnamese people when we have not even put our own house in order. And we force young black men and young white men to fight and kill in brutal solidarity. Yet when they come back home that can’t hardly live on the same block together.
    -Martin Luther King, Remaining Awake Through A Great Revolution

    Kind of echoes Rev. Wright a little bit.

  • issymayake Jan 21, 6:27 p.m.

    I am not who you think I am

    Black history month predates Dr. King; and was proposed by Carter G. Woodson (originally Negro History Week). I'm not sure why this offends. Jackson, Abernathy, and Sharpton's lives post-MLK don't change how MLK changed the American conscious and his place in history. By the way, Irish-American Heritage month is March. It was first proclaimed by the fed in 1991.

    For King's legacy, I'm referring to neo-cons of the 2000s hijacking his mantra; and completely distorting how his push for racial equality also referred to protecting the poor; calls for reparations; and a stop to war-mongering.

  • Barfly Jan 21, 6:12 p.m.

    Folks must really be celebrating in Durham. 2 shootings within 2 hours of each other. 3 words: Buick Park Avenue.

  • trekkie13 Jan 21, 6:09 p.m.

    issymayake stated: "As for many of the other posters, so many of you are so far from the message, intent and legacy of Dr. King that we really need to revise school curriculum to teach the truth about him and wish for a better, more educated future."

    Actually, the schools do not teach the truth but rather the politically correct version of him. With each passing year more and more Americans are coming to the realization that this is nothing but a liberal politically correct holiday that has made an idol out of someone for lack of a better term.

  • mojridingrb Jan 21, 6:01 p.m.

    it would be politically incorrect to talk bad about a holiday that was created to make some people feel good about a liar and cheater

  • 20K Jan 21, 5:47 p.m.

    People were so busy worshipping Obama they forgot it was MLK day! MLK did a lot to help people achieve freedom! Obama is taking freedom away from us all!!!

  • I am not who you think I am Jan 21, 5:37 p.m.

    As for many of the other posters, so many of you are so far from the message, intent and legacy of Dr. King that we really need to revise school curriculum to teach the truth about him and wish for a better, more educated future..issymayake

    We already have black history month. Which truths about Rev. King would you like taught all of them or just the pretty ones.

    He was civil rights leader don't make him out as anything else

    Individuals like Jesse Jackson Al Sharpton and Ralph Abernathy have made fortunes off his name

    Still waiting on Irish-American history month

  • Barfly Jan 21, 5:20 p.m.

    "As for many of the other posters, so many of you are so far from the message, intent and legacy of Dr. King that we really need to revise school curriculum to teach the truth about him and wish for a better, more educated future." issymayake

    More apathetic mumbojumbo.

  • issymayake Jan 21, 5:02 p.m.

    Great comment jbyrd.

    As for many of the other posters, so many of you are so far from the message, intent and legacy of Dr. King that we really need to revise school curriculum to teach the truth about him and wish for a better, more educated future.

  • weakened back Jan 21, 4:23 p.m.

    loved the day off. my buddies and i were able to get in 36 holes today. every month should have at least i holiday.

  • jbyrd Jan 21, 4:20 p.m.

    Reverand King brought a message that was desperately needed during that period of our history. There was still a great deal of injustice that had to be brought out into the light of day and he gave his life to shine that light. There were individuals on BOTH sides that slandered that message and created much of the hatred that still exists today.
    He should be viewed by ALL as a man of peace and unity and as should be, is honored for what he stood for.

    It took me years to understand this and hopefully, as time passes many more, of all races will too.

  • br549znc Jan 21, 4:07 p.m.

    You are basically correct.

  • trekkie13 Jan 21, 3:35 p.m.

    MLK Day is basically politically correct day.

  • TruthTemple Jan 21, 2:51 p.m.

    Seems to me we should have a Abraham Lincoln day---I would say he did a great deal to help out

  • dukecaniac Jan 21, 2:45 p.m.

    Really, MLK was about a non violent movement to grant civil rights to blacks in the US Anyone who would disparage him is ... well most intelligent folks can figure that out

  • I am not who you think I am Jan 21, 12:44 p.m.

    a man with a deeper understand of civil rights than those it affected most. This man was a saint.....bombayrunner

    far from being a saint , he had affairs and plagiarized parts of both his doctoral thesis and the "I Had A Dream " speech. MLK's first name isn't Martin it's Michael, far from being a saint

    Rev. Ralph Abernathy wrote a book describing Kings extra martial affairs, it's an interesting read

    http://marriage.about.com/od/politics/p/martincoretta.htm

    http://www.snopes.com/history/american/mlking.asp

  • Dan Cooper Jan 21, 12:40 p.m.

    slaterric,

    Exhibit A: An atheist who preaches acceptance for all when he openly hates all Republicans and Christians except for a Republican Christian who defies his mother's bigotry.

  • fishon Jan 21, 12:03 p.m.

    North Carolinians observed the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and public inauguration of President Barack Obama Monday with prayer, calls to service and celebrations.

    Except for the millions of North Carolinians working today, and those who are like honey badger...

  • slaterric Jan 21, 12:03 p.m.

    Well said "RadioDJ".
    It is easy for folks who are using fake logins to WRAL to make any kind of moronic comment, comments they would never make if they were using their real names.

  • Bill Brasky Jan 21, 11:53 a.m.

    "Dr King was a registered Republican. He recognized the Republican party as responsible for freeing the slaves and for promoting the civil rights act. Also the quickest was for african americans to assimilate into society was through the free enterprise system"

    MLK never endorsed a political party. He did for vote JFK. Also it's important to note the Civil Rights Act was proposed by JFK in 1963, and introduced by a NY northern Dem Emmanual Celler, it was almost blocked by a Southern Democrat William Smith of Virgina. The bill later passed due to Northern Republicans and Northern Democrats jointly approving of The bill.

    It was the Southern Dems and Republicans that voted overwhelmingly against the Civil Rights Law of 1964.

  • Offshore Jan 21, 11:44 a.m.

    you might wish to change the first part of your moniker from "wild" to "bigoted" based on your inane comment.
    welfarequeen

    you might follow your own advice on changing your moniker.

  • bombayrunner Jan 21, 11:44 a.m.

    a man with a deeper understand of civil rights than those it affected most. This man was a saint.

  • Offshore Jan 21, 11:43 a.m.

    If she had lived long enough to see a bi-racial president in White House ( for 2 terms!) I laugh out loud at the thought of my mothers scowl at the same news.
    atheistswillrule

    Gosh, sounds like a great relationship you had with your mother. Obama really hasn't done anything to reduce racism. By all measures, he has created more of a divide. And for the record, racism is a 2 way street. You can't expect to be treated fairly and kindly if you don't offer it up like a good Christian. Treat others as you wish to be treated. Sounds like a great place to start.

  • ctya Jan 21, 11:42 a.m.

    radiodj I agree with you 100%. How refreshing it would be.

  • atheistswillrule Jan 21, 11:40 a.m.

    Welfare is a trap: Talk to your president. crewdog

    There are as of 2012, 4,300,000 people in America on Welfare, or 4.1% That is ALL. 38.8% of them are white people, 39.8% are black people, 15.7 % are Hispanic. Less than 20% of all Welfare recipients have been on the program for more than 5 years. Welfare a trap? Only to your misplaced logic.

  • RadioDJ Jan 21, 11:25 a.m.

    And the usual comments from the usual suspects. It would be awesome if you'd surprise us just once and post something besides what we already knew to expect from you. Just once. But then you'd have to read past the headline before running down here to post such intelligent repartee....

  • wesha Jan 21, 11:10 a.m.

    Although King never publicly supported a political party or candidate for president, in a letter to a civil rights supporter in October 1956; he said that he was undecided as to whether he would vote for Adlai Stevenson or Dwight Eisenhower, but that "In the past I always voted the Democratic ticket." In his autobiography, King says that in 1960 he privately voted for Democratic candidate John F. Kennedy: "I felt that Kennedy would make the best president. I never came out with an endorsement. My father did, but I never made one." King adds that he likely would have made an exception to his non-endorsement policy for a second Kennedy term, saying "Had President Kennedy lived; I would probably have endorsed him in 1964."

  • jgilchr Jan 21, 11:09 a.m.

    "tell it to ophra, boo hoo cry yerself a river build a bridge and get over it...i know plenty of racists-- both black and white-- and to mention latinos-- prolly the most racist group of all."

    The correct spelling is Oprah :)

  • Lucas Turner Jan 21, 11:09 a.m.

    Yes, Dr. KIng had a dream however he would be so disappointed that his dream has not been fulfilled. The black gang, murder and drug culture has buried his dream. I read that the National Football Leagues is upset that no black/minority head coaches were hired this year for several open positions. Its a rule that at least one minority has to be interviewed. So the NFL is demandung that teams hire blacks and minorities to fill their offensive and defensive coordinator vacancies. I am sure Dr. King would be disappointed that hiring soemone because they are black instead of their skills is dishearnting. I would think that he expected more from the black citizen in the last 48 years than has transpired. Howver, with this said, thank you Dr. King for at least laying a foundation for equality and opportunity even though the black culture has ignored your vision and hard work as well as like Jesus Christ, for giving your life to a greater cause.

  • working for deadbeats Jan 21, 10:18 a.m.

    Many of todays "African Americans" give a huge slap to the face of this man and what the civil rights movement was all about. It's very sad.

  • aspenstreet1717 Jan 21, 10:17 a.m.

    It's a holiday today? So no mail.

  • tatermommy52 Jan 21, 9:49 a.m.

    Dr King was a registered Republican. He recognized the Republican party as responsible for freeing the slaves and for promoting the civil rights act. Also the quickest was for african americans to assimilate into society was through the free enterprise system.

  • welfarequeen Jan 21, 9:43 a.m.

    tell it to ophra, boo hoo cry yerself a river build a bridge and get over it...i know plenty of racists-- both black and white-- and to mention latinos-- prolly the most racist group of all. wildpig777

    you might wish to change the first part of your moniker from "wild" to "bigoted" based on your inane comment.

  • wildpig777 Jan 21, 9:32 a.m.

    tell it to ophra, boo hoo cry yerself a river build a bridge and get over it...i know plenty of racists-- both black and white-- and to mention latinos-- prolly the most racist group of all.

    as a young child growing up here in NC in the 1960's, I knew that what my mother was saying was hurtful and cruel. The look in our maid's eyes was one I will never forget. -atheist

  • COLT45 Jan 21, 9:23 a.m.

    Welfare is a trap: Talk to your president.

  • bmac813 Jan 21, 8:40 a.m.

    Just wondering if any of these Cities or States mean anything to people out there . I know it hasn't been taught in School And if you were not around than you won't know what they mean either, Atlanta, Ga, Philadelphia Pa.Trenton NJ, Washington DC, Newark NJ, Watts LA, All Burned down the next day from Riots after the Man of Peace left.

  • working for deadbeats Jan 21, 8:29 a.m.

    It's sad that his visions, dreams, and wishes are not being lived up to today. You tried, Dr.

  • atheistswillrule Jan 21, 8:09 a.m.

    I can remember my mother saying horrible racist things about Dr. King in front of our maid, Louesta. Even as a young child growing up here in NC in the 1960's, I knew that what my mother was saying was hurtful and cruel. The look in our maid's eyes was one I will never forget. She was smart enough not to confront my mother verbally and lose her job, but she had enough dignity to give one of those " if looks could kill" glances that spoke volumes. I can only imagine how proud Louesta would have been if she had lived long enough to see a bi-racial president in White House ( for 2 terms!). And I laugh out loud at the thought of my mothers scowl at the same news.

Oldest First