This story is closed for comments. Comments on WRAL.com news stories are accepted and moderated between the hours of 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Oldest First
  • sabedo Dec 11, 11:10 a.m.

    The concept of a community garden is great and one that urban areas in Europe have been doing for ages. However, how they do it there is that people "rent" their space in the garden, work it themselves and use what they grow. That concept works great for those in tight, urban living conditions who want to work for their own food and do not have the space. How many people downtown would like their own space to garden? I think a general polling of the community would be helpful here. And some clarification of this being a "government garden" or a "community garden" that people work themselves. I'm not sure the full concept is clear in this article.

  • 2headstrong Dec 11, 9:08 a.m.

    Backyard gardens were the norm when I was growing up. I'm surprised it's even a story that people want community gardens.

    @lindaburton2004: So if someone steals a car parked in front of a house, we're supposed to shrug our shoulders and ask "What did you expect to happen?". Just because something is in the open doesn't make stealing it any less wrong.

  • shortcake53 Dec 10, 7:08 p.m.

    Urban gardens are nothing new. During and after WWII people had Victory Gardens in their yards to suppliment their homes.

  • Barfly Dec 10, 6:13 p.m.

    I didn't know having a grocery store within 2 blocks from one's residence was a constitutional right. Where did the local residents shop prior to Kroger's failed venture? Furthermore, I don't think the local community is losing any sleep over the MLK Kroger's closing. Instead, it's the white apologists and so-called community leaders. Get a grip.

  • IPayYouPay Dec 10, 3:28 p.m.

    Grow things, great! No problem. Farm animals, NO THANKS! Just don't come crying to me because someone got into your yard and stole all your vegetables. I love people who move here and think NOTHING'S EVER GOING TO HAPPEN.... Yeah, right. There's someone in our neighborhood that planted some cabbages on the section between the street and the sidewalk in front of her house...cabbages one day, none the next - What in the world could have happened to them? OMG!

  • MadMaxx Dec 10, 3:17 p.m.

    FEE is the politically correct word for TAX!!!! The city of Raleigh needs to use the proper words for the left to truly understand.

  • btneast Dec 10, 2:35 p.m.

    I'd be leery of leaving my garden just out in the open away from my home for anyone to snatch the veggies whenever they like

    Yep. The concept sounds really nice, but those of us who have been around a while understand the problems this will produce. Just whose garden is it.....who does the work? Who reaps the benefits? Who decides on who can participate? Who keeps up with who works when and for how long? Who pays the taxes on the property? Who settles disputes?

  • mmtlash Dec 10, 1:45 p.m.

    I believe the urban farm would benefit apartment dwellers more so then home owners, as home owners can put a garden in their back yard anytime which is not something you can do in an apt community...although I'd be leery of leaving my garden just out in the open away from my home for anyone to snatch the veggies whenever they like

  • homefree Dec 10, 12:32 p.m.

    I love my garden at home. I'm not sure about all the details in this story. I think several folks have pointed out great questions. Something about this doesn't pass my sniff test. I would like to see the details of how, when, where, who and how much. I would support anyone adding a garden....I just don't understand the difference between a home garden for yourself and a urban garden. Why is there a $200 fee...what is that preventing of helping. There just seems to be more to this story than meets the eye.

  • brotorious Dec 10, 12:32 p.m.

    I would love to live in a place governed by all you people and your great negative ideas. It would be so nice to have a place where there were no parks, creative thinkers are punished, the weak and poor die, and nobody tries to help each other. Oh wait, that sounds like a third world country.

  • aspenstreet1717 Dec 10, 12:08 p.m.

    Why bother? Too much like work. Embrace food stamps!

  • btneast Dec 10, 10:28 a.m.

    This is a raised bed garden using a mixture of compost and soil.

    You do realize that plant roots don't stop at where the "trucked in" soil starts?

    The soil was trucked in.

    From where? How do you know how good or bad that soil is?

    Are you people commenting on soil quality that dumb?

    I think they were commenting on vacant lots in general, not any specific existing garden....

  • JustAName Dec 10, 10:26 a.m.

    "If the possibility of a small garden space is worrying you about a lack of housing, then by all means stay outside of the beltline." - brotorious

    Maybe you should have read my entire post. Just go back a few years at the corner of Wade and Oberlin and a apartment complex that had to be downsized. And, yes, there is a nice big parcel of land that would be ideal for office and residential space, but is now going to be a park.

  • whatelseisnew Dec 10, 10:25 a.m.

    " Sounds so much better than fresh local produce. Give me a break"

    Yep, you are eating from a nice outdoor bathroom facility. Enjoy.

  • whatelseisnew Dec 10, 10:24 a.m.

    "The people are ALREADY fed up. I don't see any uniting. If anything it's more divisive. Those on the dole vs. those paying for the dole. Big Guv & corp. industry are banking on that not changing."

    We have reached the point where for many millions of people it no longer makes sense to work. I have a couple of family members that would actually have far more money available to spend if they quit their jobs. The Government handouts far exceed what they keep in their pockets. They make enough to pay their expenses, not enough to do anything beyond that, and they are not eligible for any of the handouts. They do contribute in a small way towards paying for those handouts.

  • whatelseisnew Dec 10, 10:20 a.m.

    "The produce is sold to local restaurants. Unfortunately, Cook said, some people think community gardens mean free food for anyone nearby."

    And why not, the Democrats keep telling people everything should be free. Why not food? If given a choice between free food and free medical, it is a much smarter choice to take the free food. Food you absolutely have to ALWAYS have. Medical maybe yes, maybe no. No one should be forced to have to PAY for food. What is up with these greedy business owners, that insist on making a profit on something that is needed to sustain life. Water should be next. The Governments that charge people for water ought to be ashamed of themselves. People will die without water. What a horrible thing to do to the poor.

  • cynda-ur-way Dec 10, 10:14 a.m.

    I agree with goode88. These people are clueless and miserable to condemn an urban garden. How can you find fault with a community garden?

  • The Yoda Dec 10, 10:02 a.m.

    Yes, see Detroit to see how well this is working. We can bulldoze a few of those mansions downtown to make more 'green' space for these gardens.

  • CestLaVie Dec 10, 9:55 a.m.

    Negative? We're realists, not idealists.

    OK goode88, we'll watch as you give it a chance. Meanwhile, we'll grow the good stuff in our own gardens, as preppers are being warned to do along with lots of other forward-thinking actions.

  • brotorious Dec 10, 9:53 a.m.

    "Where do they expect people to live?"

    You have to be kidding. This isn't New York City. There is plenty of room inside the beltline for people to live. If the possibility of a small garden space is worrying you about a lack of housing, then by all means stay outside of the beltline.

  • brotorious Dec 10, 9:50 a.m.

    Are you people commenting on soil quality that dumb? This is a raised bed garden using a mixture of compost and soil. The soil was trucked in. Before this was a vacant lot, it housed about 3 duplex units that were taken down about 5-6 years ago. If you have a problem with it, then continue to go get your produce from Walmart. Most of that stuff comes from other countries and is treated with chemicals to make it not rot in the shipping process. Sounds so much better than fresh local produce. Give me a break.

  • CestLaVie Dec 10, 9:49 a.m.

    "The point I am making is the point I have always made, the government is not going to support something that involves people depending on themselves for success; unless that something is taxed."

    Now, you've stated it more clearly. Your first post made it sound like you were advocating a tax on community or personal gardening efforts, IMHO.

    Of course they can't save seeds. More & more they're GMO. Most people don't understand what that whole situation entails, from birth to the grave.

    The people are ALREADY fed up. I don't see any uniting. If anything it's more divisive. Those on the dole vs. those paying for the dole. Big Guv & corp. industry are banking on that not changing.

  • Riddickfield Dec 10, 9:44 a.m.

    Before I started a garden on any city property I would research what was on that property before it was cleared. In other words toxic or any kind of hazourdous waste remaining on the property. Other than that what a great opportunity for the neighborhood to teach responsibility and how hard work will be rewarded. Working for your food literally,no freebies unless you work the ground!
    goncampn2
    December 10, 2012 8:32 a.m.

    True, you never know what might be in the ground. I remember they had a difficult time with the water run-off when constructing the new civic center. could not discharge the rain water to the surface discharge, but had to send it to the city sewer. Turns out the site used to be the city gas works. the soil there was contaminated from years of coal ash and tar being dumped as part of the gas works operation. Probably full of arsenic and heavy metals. even if there was an old gas station nearby that could mean lead is in the soil.

  • Crumps Br0ther Dec 10, 9:42 a.m.

    Anyone else sick of hipsters and their ideas?

  • goode88 Dec 10, 9:17 a.m.

    Why does everyone have to be so negative, give things a chance.

  • cjw6105 Dec 10, 9:17 a.m.

    This would be the perfect solution to the Dix Hill situation: turn the whole thing into one big vegetable garden. That way, none of it gets paved and, more importantly, it keeps Dix from becoming part of the Raleigh bureaucrats' grandiose vision of becoming another downtown. The State Farmer's Market is just down the hill and produce could be hauled there to be sold. The homeless could be fed, fresh veggies no less, and soup kitchens could utilize all the buildings there rather than having them torn down.

  • JustAName Dec 10, 9:09 a.m.

    Sooo, let me get this straight. They don't want people spreading out into the rural areas. They want to save large park areas. They don't want to bulldoze run down areas. If a lot does become vacant, they want to grow a garden in it. Where do they expect people to live?

  • seenbetterdaze Dec 10, 9:08 a.m.

    The History Channel last nite had a show called Prophets of Doom, 6 or 8 guys talking about how our standard of living is doomed to decline. They all think doing as much as possible Locally, such as growing vegetables for food locally would save the gas that trucking them in from places like CA uses. If/when the USA collapses economically food shortages will be rampant as well as inflated prices. People always used to freeze and can food from their own gardens not that many years ago. Not many people even know how to garden, freeze, or can food anymore. Unless they are one of the survivalist/preppers.

  • dmccall Dec 10, 8:57 a.m.

    Let's take the most expensive land, where air quality is the poorest and soil is most contaminated, and do something that can be done on 98% of the land in this state: grow food. What could possibly go wrong?

  • cocker_mom Dec 10, 8:52 a.m.

    If the garden is staffed and tended to by volunteers and the produce is SOLD to local restaurants, can someone explain how this is a community garden? Isn't it supposed ot be that the volunteers E

  • WageSlave Dec 10, 8:41 a.m.

    WageSlave: To the contrary, I think taxing what you grow would STOP any urban farming. Where did you get that idea, or did you just write your comment incorrectly. CestlaVie

    I wrote what I meant. Local governments aren't very fond of urban farming because in essence it "starves the beast". Whatever you grow is something you don't buy from the grocery store, which is something the government does not collect taxes on. And on a rural note, farmers can't even save last years seeds to plant because you guessed it, you have to buy news every year.

    However, like so many other things,the government will allow it when they feel they have a good fee or tax system in place to benefit themselves.

    The point I am making is the point I have always made, the government is not going to support something that involves people depending on themselves for success; unless that something is taxed.

    One day, we the people will get fed up and unite for real change. Until then, we are all wageslaves

  • goncampn2 Dec 10, 8:32 a.m.

    Before I started a garden on any city property I would research what was on that property before it was cleared. In other words toxic or any kind of hazourdous waste remaining on the property. Other than that what a great opportunity for the neighborhood to teach responsibility and how hard work will be rewarded. Working for your food literally,no freebies unless you work the ground!

  • aspenstreet1717 Dec 10, 8:31 a.m.

    Too much like work. Food stamps. let someone else do the work.

  • CestLaVie Dec 10, 8:29 a.m.

    WageSlave: To the contrary, I think taxing what you grow would STOP any urban farming. Where did you get that idea, or did you just write your comment incorrectly.

    While I think this is a good idea & I've read where many communities do this, how DO YOU keep people from raiding or stealing from this "community" effort?

    The folks who want to do this would be better off putting a garden in their own back yards for more privacy & less pillage.

  • xxxxxxxxxxxxx Dec 10, 8:13 a.m.

    A $200 fee? For what? I guess, just because they can, like most other fees.

  • WageSlave Dec 10, 8:04 a.m.

    I think you will see local governments support Urban farming as soon as they find a good way to tax you on what you grow.

    By they way, Properly cycled compost and biochar are a good way to get your ferral urban soil in shape to start growing on.

  • wayneboyd Dec 10, 8:04 a.m.

    Cook said, "unfortunately some prople think community gardens mean free food for anyone nearby."
    Isn't that mindset the reason Krogers are closing in that neighborhood?

Oldest First