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  • GALNC Nov 5, 8:42 a.m.

    Hayleigh Perez, 26, who spent 14 months in Iraq, had hoped to use her GI Bill, which only pays for in-state tuition, to attend the university to get a master's degree, but she says she was told she did not qualify as a state resident because she moved to Texas with her husband, who was serving active duty there.

    She is not a NC resident...many people own coastal property and may be retired military, but if you live out of state...you don't qualify. Also...a Masters...give me a break. Go to school in Texas where you live...and acknowledge that you live.

  • begonya Nov 5, 8:19 a.m.

    Check out my film that speaks to the pain of war veterans.

    http://www.begonyaplaza.com/izarproductions/2011/10/americanhero-shortfilm.html

  • Crumps Br0ther Nov 2, 8:57 a.m.

    I'm sure its been said already but if she was an illegal the school wouldnt have had an issue with her.

  • Sherlock Nov 1, 7:34 p.m.

    Just because she got all teh signatures the school will not chage because it has to do with money, now if she plqayed football or basketball thye would have change it right away, but she is not bring money to the school.

  • common tater Nov 1, 6:59 p.m.

    Sounds like I may be alone on this one. Just cause they had a rental property in NC doesn't make them residents here, seems to me. Basically they want to have in-state tuition in any state then? She got in-state rates at another school...it's not the end of the world.

  • kawirider54 Nov 1, 6:19 p.m.

    We hear about UNCs commitment to the military community but we also hear how 'non-US-residents' somehow make it in. They get Pell grants and foreign scholarships and even social security assistance. They are currently ripping the US Gov't off to the tune of 'Billions' of taxpayer dollars. I pay alot of tax myself. (Thanks Cullen) These people are certainly welcome here however they are not entitled to any benefits that legal residents would be entitled to.

  • bluecanary Nov 1, 6:17 p.m.

    I'm pretty sure that I read in another article about this case that she purposely continued to maintain her house and pay taxes in the state of NC because she knew she was coming back here to go to school eventually. If that is true, then she should have been granted in state tuition.

  • JayJay Nov 1, 5:49 p.m.

    In recent years NC state schools have taken any excuse to force students to pay out of state tuition. They are trying to make up for loss of state funding.

  • scousler Nov 1, 5:40 p.m.

    I have read the details of this story and I agree with UNC system denial of in-state tuition. This person, even though they were an NC homeowner, was stationed in Texas and a resident of that state (where there is no state income tax). After not paying any state income tax - they complain about being denied in-state tuition rates. Sounds like they were trying butter the bread on both sides. No sympathy for her at all - she knew what she was doing - even dislike the fact that she is raising the issue of being vet to aid her cause - when it has nothing to do with the issue.

  • soldier Nov 1, 5:27 p.m.

    "Today, 12 states allow individuals who are in the United States illegally to pay the same in-state tuition rates as legal residents of the state without providing the same rates to others in the country who are here legally." ~~ United Stated Dept of Education.

    Yes, illegals ARE "privy" to in state tuition.

    FAIL #2...."Drivers license has nothing to do with residency"...
    No state in the Union issues a drivers license to a non-resident. You cannot be a non-resident of North Carolina and hold a valid NC Drivers License. ~~Real ID act.

  • superman Nov 1, 5:07 p.m.

    Well ain't she just special! With that attitude even if she gets a PhD she is not likely to find a job and keep it. Many companies do not like to hire people who think they are "special" How and why does she think she is different than doctors, EMT, teachers, law enforcement, firemen and many other people and groups that risk their life everday for us? They did away with the draft several months ago. She choose what she wanted to do and was paid for it. Thats all any of us get for our service. Whatever she pays or has paid does not even make a dent into what it costs for her education. She did the state a favor by not attending our system. Maybe she will move out of the state when and if she gets her degree.

  • pm2 Nov 1, 4:59 p.m.

    Let's give in state and government grants to illegal aliens and NOT vets....How much since does that make????Dems running things way too long!

  • readme Nov 1, 4:53 p.m.

    Taking the emotions aside here, a lot of military people change residency to avoid state taxes from their old state. Did she do this? If so, then she should be charged out of state tuition. Period. If she owns a home and pays property tax, that really isn't as relevant as where she pays income tax.

  • Mr. Middle of the Road Nov 1, 4:32 p.m.

    Obviously one of Gov Romney's 47% 'victims.'

  • forautumn Nov 1, 4:24 p.m.

    "AND WHY is it that after you have lived here in good ole' Orange County for ONLY 1 month you ARE CONSIDERED a RESIDENT by the BOARD of ELECTIONS and entitled to VOTE HERE? That being the case then WHY SHOULD ANY OUT OF STATE STUDENT EVER PAY FOR MORE THAN A SEMESTER OF OUT OF STATE TUITION??"

    Simple. If you only required a month of living to qualify for in-state tuition, everyone would move here a month before they enrolled.

    You can get a drivers license when you move to a new locale, why would you not be allowed to vote after moving?

  • trekkie13 Nov 1, 4:21 p.m.

    caniacman stated: "considering that people in the military do not get paid near enough for what they do or sign up to do. They should get "breaks" others may not. Let them get both claim a state with no income tax and go to whatever college they want at a in-state rate. I think that is the least we can do to say thank you for serving our country and protecting our freedoms."

    Actually, military members have an advantage because of things such as Basic allowance for housing and Basic allowance for substance. That is something that the civilian world does not pay for in most circumstances. Military members have an advantage because their net base pay may be equal to what the sum total a civilian takes home. However, the civilian has to use their pay to include housing and food. Basically, the military member should have more disposable income all things equal.

  • phwpoe Nov 1, 4:19 p.m.

    Granted, FSU and UNCP should have come to the same determination insofar as Ms. Perez' residency. I don't know why they didn't.

    However, I've read several articles on this subject and so far, no reporter has addressed Ms. Perez' most recent state income tax return. If she filed in NC for the past year, then she's likely a NC resident. If she didn't, she isn't. Property taxes and drivers' licenses have little to do with her situation.

  • tonto Nov 1, 3:54 p.m.

    Bill Friday would be disgusted and very ashamed of this!! He may not be here anymore but HE'S LOOKING DOWN AT ALL OF YOU ASHAMED & SAD! AND WHY is it that after you have lived here in good ole' Orange County for ONLY 1 month you ARE CONSIDERED a RESIDENT by the BOARD of ELECTIONS and entitled to VOTE HERE? That being the case then WHY SHOULD ANY OUT OF STATE STUDENT EVER PAY FOR MORE THAN A SEMESTER OF OUT OF STATE TUITION?? Has anybody ever thought about that?? I HAVE and I want an ANSWER TO IT NOW!!!

  • phwpoe Nov 1, 3:50 p.m.

    Undocumented immigrants are NOT privy to in-state tuition at NC schools.

  • forautumn Nov 1, 3:46 p.m.

    " Im sure when she went to question...UNC systems redacted the FSU offer of in state tuition."

    Actually, no they did not. Each school made the decision independent of each other.

    It is a perfectly valid question. Besides, the out of state tuition at UNC-P is LESS than the tuition at Methodist. She could have paid a lesser amount for a year, then been eligible for in-state at UNC-P.

    Something is strange about this story.

  • Wendi Nov 1, 3:46 p.m.

    For all they do for our country, I think veterans should be granted in-state tuition to ANY college or university in the nation since, as members of the national armed forces, they protect citizens in EVERY state.

  • SmarterThanAvgBear Nov 1, 3:34 p.m.

    I would support a policy that gives in-state tuition to anyone who has been stationed in NC anytime withing the last 5 years. I would extend this to spouses and children. These men and women give up so much for our safety, nevermind how much they contribute to the local economy. In my opinion they have earned the right to in-state tuition, even if it costs my kids a little more when they start college.

  • caniacman Nov 1, 3:07 p.m.

    considering that people in the military do not get paid near enough for what they do or sign up to do. They should get "breaks" others may not. Let them get both claim a state with no income tax and go to whatever college they want at a in-state rate. I think that is the least we can do to say thank you for serving our country and protecting our freedoms.

  • lyteoflife Nov 1, 3:03 p.m.

    "Perez says she applied to both UNC-Pembroke and Fayetteville Sate University and was granted in-state tuition at one, but not the other. She believes the inconsistencies within the University of North Carolina System are unjust and discriminatory."So why is she now at Methodist? Why didn't she go to Fayetteville State after applying and being accepted.

    hollylama, Fayeteville State is part of the UNC system. Im sure when she went to question...UNC systems redacted the FSU offer of in state tuition. Good for her to not giving UNC System any money. She went w a college who wanted to help her...let them have her money, Methodist is more deserving!

  • me2you Nov 1, 2:53 p.m.

    What does being a veteran have to do with it? sounds like there's inconsistencies regarless.

  • changedmyname Nov 1, 2:52 p.m.

    I am a retired Vet too, I did not pay NC income taxes during my service because I thought I was going to return to my home of record VA, but I chose not to. I waited a year before I applied to go to school. It was the right thing to do. Follow the rules.

  • pilgrimmik Nov 1, 2:45 p.m.

    A tax paying Vet should have more allowances than an undocumented alien. As long as she has proof she paid taxes in state she should be allowed in-state tuition. I totally agree undocumented aliens should not receive any benefits other than emergency care paid for with my tax dollars.

  • ncouterbanks69 Nov 1, 2:37 p.m.

    My guess is that they claimed Texas for the tax advantage, i.e., no state income tax. Shouldn't be allowed to game the system

    You bring up 2 very valid points. However I still believe that a vet should be granted a waiver. There are too many lazy that take advantage of the system and this is not one of them.

  • Grand Union Nov 1, 2:33 p.m.

    Whilst I'm all in favor of the GI bill etc....if she was not a legal resident of NC then she can't claim to be one because it saves her money.

  • ncouterbanks69 Nov 1, 2:30 p.m.

    Considering only 1% of the population serves in the military at any given time, I seriously doubt giving them a break on tuition would hurt anyone's bottom line.

    Incorrect but it does not matter. A war vet should get this break without it even being a question.

  • Blaster Nov 1, 2:24 p.m.

    I am a veteran of over 20 years. Two questions for the woman: 1. What was your stated home of record? As a dependant spouse she could use the same as her husband (thus what was his home of record) or could claim a state of prior residence. You can't just "pick" a state and claim residency without having lived there at some time. Otherwise every military member would be able to pick a state that doesn't have a state income tax or exempts active duty militry. Lots of Naval Aviators keep Florida for that reason.; 2. Where did you pay income tax? If the answer to at least one of the above is not NC then she does not warrant treatment as a NC resident. My guess is that they claimed Texas for the tax advantage, i.e., no state income tax. Shouldn't be allowed to game the system.

  • Scubagirl Nov 1, 2:22 p.m.

    this shouldn't EVEN BE A QUESTION!!! OF COURSE our vets should get in-state tuition, regardless of where they want to go. The fact that ILLEGALS can get in-state tuition but vets cannot leaves me flabbergasted at the audacity of the 'rule' makers.

  • superman Nov 1, 2:21 p.m.

    Just triple the cost of tutition and let anyone and everyone attend. Lots of people enroll and then find the going rough and quit. Education is no different than welfare--we all have to chip in and pay anyway. Education is free and so is welfare. Both ways they have their hand out wanting tax dollars.

  • Worland Nov 1, 2:18 p.m.

    Considering only 1% of the population serves in the military at any given time, I seriously doubt giving them a break on tuition would hurt anyone's bottom line.

    Pretty shabby treatment of veterans in NC considering how many troops are stationed here and how much this state depends on the billions of dollars the troops dump into NC's economy every year.

  • yellow_hat Nov 1, 2:15 p.m.

    She chose to move to Texas - so she was not a resident of NC. Being a vet has nothing to do with it. She was treated exactly like every other person - I see no issue.

  • whatelseisnew Nov 1, 2:10 p.m.

    "*shrug* Personally, I think that any college the GI wants to attend should accept the GI Bill at the in-state rate. Soldiers don't serve for a state, they serve for the country."

    The receive Federal Benefits towards education. The States have to have some means of controlling eligibility for things like in-state tuition. But as I have said it is time to let the Universities stand on their own, and their should be the same amount of tuition required from everybody. Pay now and be done with it or keep the current method which means YOU NEVER finish paying for college.

  • trekkie13 Nov 1, 2:08 p.m.

    shokkou stated: "*shrug* Personally, I think that any college the GI wants to attend should accept the GI Bill at the in-state rate. Soldiers don't serve for a state, they serve for the country."

    As a conservative verteran I agree that soldiers serve the whole country unlike police and fire who serve only a limited community. With that stated this particular case and news story aside some military members purposefully change their home of records to states with no income taxes. Whereas, other military members instead of changing their home of record continue to pay income taxes in their native state. Would it be fair for a military member who never paid income taxes move to the state where the fellow military member paid their income taxes and then get in state tuition?

  • kmengineer08 Nov 1, 2:07 p.m.

    actually it only requires a year living in state huskylove

  • kmengineer08 Nov 1, 2:07 p.m.

    I'm against her having access to in state tuition. She needs to establish her residency. As veteran and not active duty she is not entitled to the same benefits that come with active duty service since she can freely choose what state she lives in now. Sorry if all veterans were given in state tuition in all states it would be a budget issue.

  • whatelseisnew Nov 1, 2:06 p.m.

    It is time to eliminate in-state tuition. In the long run it will cost everybody less money. With in-state tuition, essentially YOU NEVER finish paying for college. For those that never go to college or have paid for private college it is a double ripoff. The university system needs to stand on its own.

  • HUSKYLOVE Nov 1, 2:03 p.m.

    To qualify for state tuition you must LIVE in the state for the 2 years prior to matriculation. That being said, our military do not have a choice where they are stationed and generally are reassigned every 24-36 months. Makes it very hard for them to establish State Residency. Why not grant a waiver if they maintain their "permenant residence" here.

  • shokkou Nov 1, 2:01 p.m.

    *shrug* Personally, I think that any college the GI wants to attend should accept the GI Bill at the in-state rate. Soldiers don't serve for a state, they serve for the country.

  • trekkie13 Nov 1, 1:52 p.m.

    First let me say that I am a veteran. With that stated just because a person owns property in a state does not make them citizens of that state. Many people own and pay property in multiple states but it does not make them citizens of more than one state. A person can be only a citizen of one state at a specific point in time and in the military a person is allowed to have only one state for home of record at a time. Property taxes are not the same as state income taxes. The university system is funded by state revenue and not local revenue. If for the qualifying period to determine eligibility no state income taxes were being paid and the home of record was in Texas then yes Pembroke is correct. Using the illegal immigrant tuition argument here still does not make it right.

  • ConcernedNCC Nov 1, 1:51 p.m.

    I think they delivered 145,000 names on a petition, not 145,000 petitions.

  • SaveEnergyMan Nov 1, 1:50 p.m.

    Did she pay NC state taxes or pay state sales tax on food/clothes/etc in NC? No. Property taxes are paid to the county, not the state. She was, in the state's eyes, out of state, and they made the right decision based on that interpretation.

    Now, should she get in-state tuition being a veteran, having lived in state in the past, and owning property here?? That's a matter of opinion. I am not opposed to that at all, but it needs to be made law and applied consistently.

  • ashcash21 Nov 1, 1:47 p.m.

    If she was not working, she would be considered a resident of whatever state her husband is a resident of. That's what happened to my sister. She was a SAHM for years in NC and when she applied to colleges in the area they said she would have to pay out of state tuition, since her husband was a resident of another state and she did not work.

    I have no idea how they got to that logic. If she lives in the state for 6 months isn't she granted in state tuition?

  • jdag Nov 1, 1:45 p.m.

    I'm a veteran and the GI Bill was great for me. Granting a veteran in-state tuition is a small thing to do for someone who have honorably served our country. I support in-state tuition for veterans. I would think someone treated like this would be less likely to stay in the state after completing their education.

  • dwr1964 Nov 1, 1:45 p.m.

    This just shows how messed up this country is. If anyone deserves to achieve higher education, our men and women who fought for their country, should be number 1 in acceptance into college. And I don't care what state they may reside. They put their lives on the line for every state, not just NC. This is simply idiotic.

  • 12-21-12 Nov 1, 1:43 p.m.

    Military folks move alot, how could you limit the choice of schools for Vets.

  • hollylama Nov 1, 1:36 p.m.

    "Perez says she applied to both UNC-Pembroke and Fayetteville Sate University and was granted in-state tuition at one, but not the other. She believes the inconsistencies within the University of North Carolina System are unjust and discriminatory."

    So why is she now at Methodist? Why didn't she go to Fayetteville State after applying and being accepted.

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