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  • chimp1 Sep 20, 6:24 p.m.

    ann anderson vs cyrovac...A Civil Action is a 1998 American drama film starring John Travolta (as plaintiff's attorney Jan Schlichtmann) and Robert Duvall, based on the book of the same name by Jonathan Harr. Both the book and the film are based on a true story of a court case about environmental pollution that took place in Woburn, Massachusetts in the 1980s.

    The movie and court case revolve around the issue of trichloroethylene, an industrial solvent, and its contamination of a local aquifer. A lawsuit was filed over industrial operations that appeared to have caused fatal cases of leukemia and cancer, as well as a wide variety of other health problems, among the citizens of the town. The case involved is Anne Anderson, et al., v. Cryovac, Inc., et al.. The first reported decision in the case is at 96 F.R.D. 431 (denial of defendants' motion to dismiss). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Civil_Action_%28film%29

  • Milkman Sep 20, 1:49 p.m.

    MTBE - it's use was Federally mandated by the EPA until it was discovered how bad it was. So was the regulation mandating the use of MTBE good or bad? Same with the federal regs covering the required use of asbestos as a fire safety product. Just curious.

    Also, Rand was a believer in the judiciary and for the government making and enforcing laws against fraud for example. Rand would possibly argue here that the homeowners don't OWN the land, they rent it from the Government (try not paying taxes on it and see if she was right) so the Government, in allowing them to purchase (or lease) the land messed up because the product wasn't safe. Seriously, Rand would argue that the previous owner had an obligation not to poison the land or to at least disclose what had occured, so in not doing so exposed liability.

  • AtALost Sep 20, 1:21 p.m.

    "US voted Obama into power?? Got us on that one!!" Don't complaing about environmental issues if you're going to complain about Obama. Republicans are anti environment.

  • pinball wizard Sep 20, 12:08 p.m.

    The headline emphatically states the two companies caused the wells problem. The body of the story says that they "likely" caused the pollution.

    Which is it?

  • cushioncritter Sep 20, 11:48 a.m.

    The class action lawsuits are worth pursuing as bankruptcy law does not allow discharge of debt such as successful lawsuits for those convicted of environmental crimes. I'm not sure how this works when the individuals involved try to hide behind "the corporate veil" though, unless it can be pierced.

  • Rebelyell55 Sep 20, 11:14 a.m.

    It wouldn't surprise me at all that someone in the company knew what they were doing.

  • AtALost Sep 20, 11:08 a.m.

    "DENR first became aware of contamination in 2005" Notice this doesn't say when it first started.

    "The companies were not named, but DENR officials said they have been working for years to make the polluters foot the bill for fixing the problem."

    Nice that they're working on it. I'm sure the families take comfort in knowing if they get cancer, they know why. Hopefully DENR will have been successful instead of just 'working on' making the companies pay. But anyone with half a brain knows that fixing something is never as good as before it was broken. We're likely to see the same stories after fracking begins. There's never enough money for proper oversight and most people cut corners for profits and they're lazy. Sadly, those with their heads in the sand won't be the only ones affected.

  • LovemyPirates Sep 20, 11:07 a.m.

    grosol is right.
    Also, arsenic is natural and found in soils. Do these same people want high levels of arsenic in your food & water?

  • geosol Sep 20, 10:43 a.m.

    Some right winger wrote, "Here's the problem for the EPA. These compounds also occur naturally in nature. So you get a lot of false positives for contamination when it's just natural background clutter".
    WHAT?!?!?!? Are you KIDDING?!?!?! Please enlighten us all about how chlorinated solvents are "naturally occurring"! Wow! PLEASE take some time to educate yourself with real science and not just right wing propaganda. Of course, I think this poster also stated that the Deepwater Horizon blowout was "just a minor spill". Unbelievable!

  • streetglide Sep 20, 10:42 a.m.

    lets just inject some more chemical into the ground and force all the bad stuff to the top and vacuum it up??,, OOO sorry, that is Fracking,, my bad!!
    can people not see that there are some thing we don't need to do, to have fuel,----- wood, coal, etc.. are far better choices, and have been used for 100 years or more.
    Raleigh can always call BP for clean up, the GULF is better than ever and tourism is better than ever!.. I am beginning to think our Media and companies, think everyone in the US is just plain stupid and will believe anything. And guess they are right, US voted Obama into power?? Got us on that one!!

  • dontstopnow Sep 20, 10:34 a.m.

    There is one thing I have not seen much conversation on from this blog and that is the prospective buyers responsibility to perform due diligence on these matters before buying the home. I know people get excited over a new home, but it is a bit late to play the blame game over this now and like every home in this country, did that knowledge pass down generation to generation and the contractor just cover it up? I think not.

    I live in a rural area and have a well myself, I have a water system installed on it to keep the iron in check. This land was farm land at some point and I have a natural spring on the property that I have escavated and placed a pond. But honestly, these sort of issues are always going to crop up everywhere because we are simply recycling land over and over since they are not making any new land... right? I am sure the dangers of any chemicals were know 'after the fact' in the early days of usage. That makes it your responsibility to do the checks and tests "befo

  • Wolfpack Joe Sep 20, 10:32 a.m.

    I am sure these companies moved overseas to China where the cost of environmental protection regulation is zero. Won't be long before half of china becomes inhabitable due to poor environmental protection and companies move their plants to new locations to contaminate and spoil.

  • cocker_mom Sep 20, 10:29 a.m.

    piene2 - there are likely other non-cancer illnesses that can be caused by MTBE.

  • are you kidding me Sep 20, 10:22 a.m.

    A circuit board assembly plant did not contaminate well water. Keep looking

  • ripetomatoes Sep 20, 10:10 a.m.

    The circuit boards in the computer you are now using were likely cleaned with this exact substance.

  • piene2 Sep 20, 10:03 a.m.

    "I too hope all the families do not become ill / get cancer because of this -"

    It has always been my understanding that getting cancer is tantamount to being ill.

  • goner Sep 20, 10:02 a.m.

    I see "MTBE" on that map too, which was an oxygenate that the state mandated was to be added to gasoline back in the 90's. MTBE was found to have a high potential for poisoning underground aquifers; a very small amount is all that's needed to make it unusable. Someone should sue the state since ultimately it was their fault it got into that well.

  • ripetomatoes Sep 20, 9:59 a.m.

    This water problem is not much different than for millions of homes built on former farmland where tons of chemicals were applied to crops & animals & have since leached into groundwater (water supplies). Have your wells tested for ALL chemicals. Better yet, distill your water, in your own kitchen. Quit wasting money on gazillion brands of bottled water which strangles store shelves.

    CestLaVie

    Paranoia strikes deep. Please make a copy of your own comment to carry with you and read it while you select those spotless apples and bug/worm free veggies at your local market. And please never ever move out here to the countryside.

  • whatelseisnew Sep 20, 9:50 a.m.

    ""Where are the Rand acolytes insisting the government step away from this?

    Sounds like the impacted homeowners are in favor of Nanny State entitlements."

    It's those pesky pinko environmentalists again. Let them drink Coke! A little poison never hurt anyone, right?"

    The Government in fact failed again. It should have been required that any home construction be halted. It should have been required that realtors and private sellers disclose that this substance was detected in wells in the area, even if the particular home for sale did not yet show the problem.
    Aside from that, despite ALL THE LEVELS of GOvernment and DESPITE all the endless regulations, did that PREVENT this from happening. NOPE and it never will. The State and Feds can write TRILLIONS of regs if it wants, and those REGS will never prevent a thing from happening. I mean after all, you never see anyone speed, or run red lights, or run stop signs or drive drunk or drive without a license do you? The laws prevent it

  • Kaitlyn Sep 20, 9:41 a.m.

    "As someone who is about to move to where there will be a well - would standard water testing pick this up?"

    You should ask them what volatile organics are included in the standard test. TCE isn't something you would normally suspect to find in a private well unless you live at camp LeJeune or next door to a dry cleaners.

  • Worland Sep 20, 9:41 a.m.

    We called the stuff "trike" when I was still in the military. Along with MEK, it's probably the best cleaner & degreaser known to man. Trike's been around for 100yrs. Been used from everything from anesthetic, to food prep to dry cleaning.

    Here's the problem for the EPA. These compounds also occur naturally in nature. So you get a lot of false positives for contamination when it's just natural background clutter. And... the EPA "thinks" it causes cancer. They "think" it can cause childhood disease. There's really no proof. If it does cause cancer, the VA will have to compensate millions of veterans who used this stuff every day.

  • davido Sep 20, 9:29 a.m.

    "Where are the Rand acolytes insisting the government step away from this?

    Sounds like the impacted homeowners are in favor of Nanny State entitlements."

    It's those pesky pinko environmentalists again. Let them drink Coke! A little poison never hurt anyone, right?

  • cocker_mom Sep 20, 9:23 a.m.

    One other question - would annual water testing through DENR have caught this? I know the water treatment folks at home shows tout having your water tested, etc.

    As someone who is about to move to where there will be a well - would standard water testing pick this up?

  • cocker_mom Sep 20, 9:21 a.m.

    Wow - printed circuit board manufacturing and assembly is hasty business. And if this dumping occurred in Wake Forest - imagine what it's like in China?

    I can't imagine how extensive the cleanup is going to be if the stuff is still spreading and still contaminating more wells.

    I too hope all the families do not become ill / get cancer because of this - I can't imagine how I would be of that were to happen to my / my family as a direct result of someone dumping nasty chemicals into the ground without regard for anything but profit and convenience.

    And yet - people still dump motor oil in creeks, etc.

  • LovemyPirates Sep 20, 9:20 a.m.

    These regulations are job killers and evil. We should get rid of them so we can complete with China. Shut down the EPA - - SARCASM

  • CestLaVie Sep 20, 9:02 a.m.

    Country Girlz: If they aren't sick now, it will materialize eventually. Too many instances of this type of thing over the decades, while the companies involved are in denial. Same goes for many OTHER industries in this nation, selling their goods & earning profits (sometimes gigantic), while WE die, unsuspecting.

    Independent: Families don't have the source of income & CLOUT to bring this carp to the public forefront for prosecution, let alone pay for future public medical bills.

  • Kaitlyn Sep 20, 8:54 a.m.

    There will be a lot more of this to look forward to as deregulation of industries, fracking, and other reckless environmental legislation becomes the mantra in NC.

  • CestLaVie Sep 20, 8:53 a.m.

    "Residents, however, said they were never made aware of any potential contamination and have been drinking well water for years."

    Of course not. As in ALL matters affecting the American public, let the buyer AND citizen beware. We are being sold a bill of goods on so many fronts, it's bewildering. Yep - we're free all right. Free to kill ourselves or free to let someone else do it TO the unsuspecting "us." Food. Drugs. Air. Water. Government. Corporations. Legal system. Insurance system.

    Khrushchev was right. They didn't have to destroy us; we're destroying ourselves from within.

    This water problem is not much different than for millions of homes built on former farmland where tons of chemicals were applied to crops & animals & have since leached into groundwater (water supplies). Have your wells tested for ALL chemicals. Better yet, distill your water, in your own kitchen. Quit wasting money on gazillion brands of bottled water which strangles store shelves.

  • csmith517 Sep 20, 8:38 a.m.

    NBC 17 has a video. The company was C-Tron. They made circuit board assemblies. There is a gentleman they interviewed that saw the dumping. He said 50-100 gallons. There is still a company in business at the site. They are TEAM Electric. Same family members own it.

  • Country Girlz Have MORE fun Sep 20, 8:37 a.m.

    I hope none of these families have had bad health due to this.

  • independent_thinker Sep 20, 8:22 a.m.

    Libertarians should insist this is a private matter between the homeowners and the companies which caused the contamination.

    Where are the Rand acolytes insisting the government step away from this?

    Sounds like the impacted homeowners are in favor of Nanny State entitlements.

  • corey3rd Sep 20, 8:20 a.m.

    We Built This....and polluted your property before moving our carnival of poison to the next town.

  • Milkman Sep 20, 8:05 a.m.

    Can WRAL do some investigative reporting and find out who those companies were? Are they bankrupt or still operating?

  • BigOski Sep 20, 8:05 a.m.

    Why isn't DENR or WRAL disclosing who the companies are? We as consumers should have the right to know and make a decision if we wish to do business with such entities.

  • davidgnews Sep 20, 8:02 a.m.

    Sorry, DENR isn't working hard enough if it's already been 'years.'

    A class-action suit sounds like the way to go, at least it will get someone's attention.

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