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  • gunny462 Aug 15, 4:30 p.m.

    "I agree with alot of posts...such as Bush didn't lie; there were WMD's in Iraq and even IF they hadn't found any, he WAS given the intelligence that there were"

    Actually saw those WMDs after DS/DS. The problem was with the 'agents' used by the French and ??? (can't remember the other country) who were given false intel.

    Also, if any of these intellectual know-it-alls could/would read what a WMD comprises they'd be amazed.

  • gunny462 Aug 15, 3:56 p.m.

    "a blind fool if you don't see there are cover-ups everywhere in the military & gov't"

    Yup area 51 for sure.....

    "There is a suicide and/or murder just about every day - this article even states that the Pentagon said 30 more soldiers died earlier this year from suicide than in combat/deployment situations"

    And the military covered it up?

    "When you've lived around a military base your entire life, you see & hear a whole lot more than is reported"

    uhuh... little green men. btw, 24 years in the A.F, 2 in GS working for Command I.G. I had a friend who killed 2 people and committed suicide and I know for a fact that 1. I couldn't have stopped him from killing those people nor 2. stopped him from killing himself and 3? There was no cover up.

    I've stated this before and will attempt to enlighten you again. The armed services is legally bound to report all deaths, war or otherwise.

  • seven74215 Aug 15, 1:16 p.m.

    I was in the service for four years. Never had or saw or know of any of my fellow soldiers who suffer or have suffered from PTSD from anything that the military has caused. Not saying it doesn't exist. I'm saying that it's not just one factor (the military) causing them to commit sucide. That might be a part of it but its not the underlying factor.

    America's suicide rate has been proven to rise and fall in relation to how well the economy is doing, according to the first-ever study to compare suicide rates to U.S. business cycles. I've tried to put the link to a site in here by copying and pasting but it didn't work. Just google Sucide rate in America and you can find the link. The study was done in 2011.

  • cherilinton Aug 14, 6:33 p.m.

    First off I am so sorry for your loss. Fortunately I still have my soldier with me, barely. He had a major break in Dec and asked his VA "team" to help. Every week they would tell us still trying to figure out what to do. The end of Feb all he wanted was to die(and not the first time). As things escalated I had to leave the house for my own safety. I ended up calling 911 to save him. Because of my initial presence and the ivolvement of a weapon the state's answer is to charge him with felony assault. Here is one of our wounded warriors that asked for help when he really needed it and was put off. It could have been the end of us both and then my mother would have been in your shoes. The way it stands now legally my hands are tied and can no longer call for help or we lose our house and he goes to prison. All I can do is to cross my fingers and hope we both wake up the next day. They have to fix this.

  • NH Aug 14, 5:02 p.m.

    I saw this article earlier and wow the comments that have posted since then! I agree with alot of posts...such as Bush didn't lie; there were WMD's in Iraq and even IF they hadn't found any, he WAS given the intelligence that there were. Iraq's timing may have been off but we should have rid the world of Hussein long long ago...the UN actually should have done something long ago. We absolutely belonged in Afghanistan and anyone who can't see that really needs a wake up call. The military does try to work with PTSS and many times medication is the only way to begin treatment. Yes, many of our problems do stem from a lack of morals and from what has become an entitlement society. I still feel sad for this family and pray healing for them can begin. I know many times many govt agencies have "cover ups" but I think this excuse is way overused!

  • brassy Aug 14, 3:11 p.m.

    My heart breaks for this family!

  • jjordan231179 Aug 14, 3:08 p.m.

    "Prevention programs are good but if you really want to help the military out we need to bring evceryone home"

    Sounds GREAT!! Too bad Americans keep voting for warmongers like Obama and Romney.

  • daughters of anarchy Aug 14, 2:54 p.m.

    @jwood011...Where is your proof in a military cover up? I have plenty of Troops around me everyday who have been deployed multible times and they are just fine! Sorry about your friend because that is tragic but some people just can't take it at all.dwolfkeeper2-----------------
    It has everything to do with their MOS sometimes too. And when they were there. Where they were. Ground pounders such as my husband and son are exposed to way more than say motor t.

  • kaiser22006 Aug 14, 2:54 p.m.

    angel100912 Thank you for your apology. I apologize as well for assuming things that are incorrect. This story was to get recognition for the returning troops that may be faced with these same problems and for the ones that are here now dealing with this exact issue. I wish you and your family now the best also. Again, thank you and please accept my sincere apology.

  • daughters of anarchy Aug 14, 2:50 p.m.

    If I may state my humble opinion once more,... I don't care who started the war. Does it do us any good to blame anyone? Are they going to be held accountable? Will it bring back all of our dead Hero's? Will they do prison time? Repay all the money that has been spent? This is where we are. What I do see as a mistake however, is how long we have been engaged in both of these wars. We should have had a clear objective. Our troops should have been given their orders and been allowed to carry them out without the current ROE, (rules of engagement) and get this done with Godspeed and come back home. Our troops have been deployed and deployed again and again. They are fighting a war that they do not believe can be won as in past wars.

  • dwolfkeeper2 Aug 14, 2:29 p.m.

    @jwood011...Where is your proof in a military cover up? I have plenty of Troops around me everyday who have been deployed multible times and they are just fine! Sorry about your friend because that is tragic but some people just can't take it at all. The Military screens these kids all the time, especially when they return from the AOR. If a person doesn't want to open up about what is going on inside, YOU CAN'T MAKE THEM? You can only go so far. This poor lady said she didn't see the signs. Why? Because they may not have been there for her to see. Do you really think the military is just going to sit around and not trey to prevent this from happening? There are great resources out there for all the services to use, it is up to the individual to relize they need the help. You can't force them.

  • angel100912 Aug 14, 2:26 p.m.

    @kaiser22006- I want to apologize for armyprouds11 comments. The commments were rude an inappropriate for this type of forum. This is not the place to discuss that type of information. I am sorry for your loss. The truth about a lot of things will stay in the past because it does not matter at this point, nor do you need to endure any more pain than you already have dealt with. The only comment I will present is that I am not drawing any kind of money for my son. Outside of that, what happened between him and I as far as my son goes, and what you were informed will always be two different stories. I wish you the best.

  • dwolfkeeper2 Aug 14, 2:18 p.m.

    @ ss3510, blaming all of this on one person is just asinine. There is plenty of blame to go around. I was in both Gulf 1 and 2. Hate to break it to you but WMD were found in Iraq it just didn't make it into the media. Plus every intell source at the time said Iraq had WMD's. Bush is not the only one who said it. The UN even sited those reports. Now did Bush make mistakes as far as this war was concerned, you bet! But he is not the only one who got it wrong.

  • jwood011 Aug 14, 2:14 p.m.

    "...officials have examined every suicide at Fort Bragg, and they have seen four common threads – relationship failures, professional failures, alcohol abuse and drug abuse" - that is a lie and they know it. They're only trying to shift the blame off the military - they're masters at cover-ups and the blame game, much like their current Commander-in-Chief. I've said for years that all military personnel need psych evaluations at least once a year. My best friend's husband committed suicide a few years ago & the Army tried to blame it on her, but they were way off base on that one - they were in love and had only been married for a couple months. It shocked her as much as it did the rest of us. Some folks just can't handle all the stress, etc. that comes from being deployed in times of war.

  • dwolfkeeper2 Aug 14, 2:10 p.m.

    In my experence in both Law Enforcement and the Military, the problem is not looking for the signs. People who show the signs usually are wanting people to pay attention. When a person makes up their minds to do it they don't tell anyone or give off those "vibes". They just do it. Prevention programs are good but if you really want to help the military out we need to bring evceryone home. Twelve years of war is way to long.

  • armyproud11 Aug 14, 1:32 p.m.

    @Kaiser22006 first off I am not the mother of jasons son. But I will say this. His son's mother is not drawing a single penny of benefits from this situation. She has chosen to stay out of this situation and declined when the VA offered to help her recieve benefits. So you may want to think before you speak about a woman you have never met. She never once told him that was not his son. He made that claim himself and he gave up custody of his son to her on his own choice. She never denied him access to his son. And to claim she had not been around him in 3 to 4 years is incorrect. You obviously do not have your facts straight. Do not sit here and bad mouth a woman who has chosen to take the high road and has opted to take no benefits for her son and has chosen to stay out this situation.

  • cindylouwho Aug 14, 1:30 p.m.

    armyproud11---your comments seem unkind for the most part.

  • ss3510 Aug 14, 1:21 p.m.

    The military will do all they can to keep this quiet. They are great at cover-ups. The bottom line for the military is and has always been...War is a Racket (and big profits are at stake).

  • cindylouwho Aug 14, 1:16 p.m.

    Thanks Angie Selvia for sharing this very sad personal story so that others might be helped. If one soldier or his family is helped by your coming forward, it will be worth it. Having met Tiffany several times, she was lovely and I know you and all her family and friends miss her. We do not do enough for our soldiers when they return. They should have some period of decompression when they return. Wives, too, should be counseled on what to watch for and how to avoid a tragedy such as this. Prayers for all the family and friends of Tiffany and Jason.

  • kaiser22006 Aug 14, 1:15 p.m.

    snshine62d; you are absolutely correct in saying that this is no ones business but those involved and she definitely is not involved. She wants a pity party and that is absolutely not what this article is all about. It wasn't about my daughters death. This story is to make people aware of the situations these soldiers face when they come home after war. They need help! armyproud11 made the comment that he was only going to the va to get meds that he was addicted to. who does she think prescribled this addictive medication to him in the first place? the va did! instead of medicating them, find a way to help them! the article is about finding a solution for these guys! the army spends millions on teaching these soldiers how to kill but how much are they spending to teach them how to survive in a world that they're no longer used to?

  • johnny2times Aug 14, 1:01 p.m.

    Well if the military could PREDICT a soldier commiting suicide, I'm sure they would do what they could to stop it...many times suicide happens after there back home and on leave...regardless, HOW are they suppose to control what soldiers are thinking about doing? If you have an answer for that, you might want to tell all the generals...the military can't control what soldiers do (i.e. drugs/alcohol) or do anything about their relationship status...bottom line is that they don't have a crystal ball to look into...maybe the soldiers need to seek help when they need it..the military can't hold their hands all the time.

  • BubbaDukeforPresident Aug 14, 12:48 p.m.

    PTSD is a broad description - another excuse for abberant behavior. I served for 24 years, got shot at,etc. I've never considered suicide or made excuses for my success or lack thereof. Life happens to all of us and we all cope differently. Fortunately, my generation wasn't into the 'victim' mentality. If you did something to us we got even and then forgot about it; or if it was something we could do nothing about we moved on.

    Certainly our military are asked to do the impossible and to put the mission before self. They see and do things we can't even imagine. Faith used to play a more prominent role in our upbringing and in the way we interact in society, but that's been replaced with humanism and victimization mentality so you end up with people who think they have the right to respond in a criminal manner. We're just reaping what we've sown - a weak, immoral and irresponsible mess.

  • snshine62d Aug 14, 12:48 p.m.

    Kaiser22006 and armyproud11 First let me say that I'm sorry for your loss. And then I'd like to offer a small suggestion. Try not to air all your laundry for everyone else to see because it's really no ones business. Unfortunately no one will know what truly happened. Let's pray for the ones that were left behind. And take care of the little boy and bring him up to be a proud young man.

  • luke8ball Aug 14, 12:47 p.m.

    "Is the military entirely to blame for this? What about the economy and the shape of America Obama has gotten us into?"

    Why must everything be Obama's fault?

  • NH Aug 14, 12:37 p.m.

    So sad. I have two sons who are former Marines; one did his tour in Iraq, the other all over including Iraq, Afghanistan and currently works for the Dept of Defense and is in Afghanistan again. It is hard on the young men and women serving our country as well as the families they leave behind. I am very thankful and proud of them all for their selfless service to our country. The sad truth is, we, as a country, tend to recognize and idolize things that really don't matter; i.e. actors/actresses, singers, etc. and forget those that do matter such as the miliatry men and women, law enforcement, fire dept, teachers... Perhaps we all need a reality check on what is most important to support and take care of.

  • kaiser22006 Aug 14, 11:45 a.m.

    armyproud11 you think you know everything, you know ABSOLUTELY NOTHING! you had not been around jason in 3-4 years, you have NO CLUE what went on....i will say this, it is tragic that he left a young son behind but YOU are the one that told him that that son was NOT his. YOU are the one that refused to let him see that son, now YOU want to reap the benefits from jasons death by that son drawing a check!!!! i suggest YOU keep your mouth shut when you don't have a clue. You have your son here, I do not have my daughter here and she's not here to defend herself nor jason. before you speak, THINK!!!! btw, Brian Mims, you did a wonderful job researching and reporting this story!

  • debrablack22 Aug 14, 11:31 a.m.

    Is the military entirely to blame for this? What about the economy and the shape of America Obama has gotten us into?

  • armyproud11 Aug 14, 11:10 a.m.

    The sadness in all of this story is the majority of it is not true. He was never denied anything from the VA. He chose not to use the VA. The only thing he went to the VA for was to get more pain meds that he was addicted to. The VA tried to help him multiple times but he kept making the decision to not take their help. There is so much more to this story that what is being reported, but people always want someone else to blame instead of realizing that he made a choice. Had the reporter done a better job of researching this information before publishing it, he would have realized that some information in this article is false. Though tragic for the Selvia family, it also even more tragic that he left behind a very young son that everyone has forgotten about.

  • daughters of anarchy Aug 14, 11:04 a.m.

    the soldiers have to want help not just a check .
    gphotohound2............
    Why does money always come up? They either don't want help or they just want a check according to most people. So which is it? My husband is 70%. That's $1370 a month. Wow. I work full time and it's hard. He was working and his nerves got so bad that he had to quit. He lost 30 pounds in about 45 days. The VA told him he could not work anymore right now. So he waited a year before he even tried to get 100% via the Unemployability Act. He is still waiting. Even though they get help it still doesn't fix things fast. He goes to counseling twice a week. See's his "wizard" often too. Just stop and think before some of you say things.

  • Uhavenoclu Aug 14, 10:58 a.m.

    Another you can add to my Told you so......Look back months ago I told y'all there will be many more,but you think I don't know what I am saying.I have proved more then anyone here...you just cry I say what will happen and it has happened quite a few times.Listen without judgment.

  • emtp2k Aug 14, 10:41 a.m.

    One thing that I think helped soldiers up until Korea is that the soldiers came home on ships, it took time for them to get home, they had peers to talk to about what they saw. Someone that was there that understood the pain they went through. During Vietnam we started bringing the soldiers home on planes, now with Iraq and Afghanistan they are battling one day and a couple of days later they are home expected to live by a different set of rules. It would be normal for anyone to wake up and not know where they are or forget which rules they had to go by.

  • Relic Aug 14, 10:28 a.m.

    The only way that the military can "stop solider suicides" is to disband and that ain't an option. Want to stop solider suicides? Cut down on PTSD? Then have the US society as a whole quit treating military personnel like rabid dogs when they come home. However I think it goes back even further. We have ruined many of the young men (and in some cases women) before they go to the military by giving them an unreasonable expectation of life itself.

  • daughters of anarchy Aug 14, 10:11 a.m.

    And the military didn't create this problem.. society did.
    Semper Fi Wife...........
    Not society, our government. Our men and women are only honoring the oath they took.

  • gphotohound2 Aug 14, 10:11 a.m.

    you can have all the programs to help the soldiers you want but if they don't go what good are the programs . the soldiers have to want help not just a check .

  • daughters of anarchy Aug 14, 10:10 a.m.

    A very clear example that there may be other issues at "home" that influence the PTSD diagnosis.
    AlbertEinstein.........
    Yeah at "home"...as in "USA"... with uneducated people sitting behind a keyboard with someone else's name like yourself, passing judgement on REAL men.

  • AlbertEinstein Aug 14, 9:45 a.m.

    "My husband is 70% PTSD. He was a machine gunner in Irag. My son, is in prison. PTSD. He was a gunner also over there. Some of you comaparing this and that have NO clue whatsoever. Yeah, my husband is raking in the big bucks just pretending he has problems and my son just loves prison. Some of you are a joke."
    FIREMALL

    A very clear example that there may be other issues at "home" that influence the PTSD diagnosis.

  • Semper Fi Wife Aug 14, 9:29 a.m.

    I know in the Marine Corps, they offer a lot of programs. I can't imagine those programs not being offered to all branches to prevent suicide. We were stationed on a base with the highest suicide rate in the US. Still, they crammed the "suicide prevention" down everyone's throat. It's up to the service member to be proactive and take part of such programs.

    And the military didn't create this problem.. society did.

  • daughters of anarchy Aug 14, 9:24 a.m.

    I live this daily. My husband is 70% PTSD. He was a machine gunner in Irag. My son, is in prison. PTSD. He was a gunner also over there. Some of you comaparing this and that have NO clue whatsoever. Yeah, my husband is raking in the big bucks just pretending he has problems and my son just loves prison. Some of you are a joke.

  • kermit60 Aug 14, 9:24 a.m.

    atheistswillrule; Your comment is far from the truth. There are numerous mental health programs available for soldiers and the families. Some are confidential with no record of the visit or counseling. The hard part is getting the soldiers to seek help if they think they have a problem. Many times the soldiers problems are not seen by anyone until after the fact. As far as not joining the military. If it wasn't for the soldiers past and present we would probably be speaking, german, Chinese or Russian on this blog if it even existed.

  • mrs.csm Aug 14, 9:22 a.m.

    unless they can get a "live-in babysitter" to monitor a person's every action/word/move....it is impossible to stop someone from doing something they are intent on doing. WHY did we ever stop making people responsible for THEIR OWN actions?!?!

  • piene2 Aug 14, 9:14 a.m.

    After World War Two, many returning soldiers were traumatized and they were fighting in a legitimate war. One can easily see how our troops are traumatized coming home from fighting totally uncalled for wars of aggression. The United States used to be the good guys., not invading aggressors overthrowing governments and trashing entire nations.

  • Gunny the Racist Aug 14, 9:06 a.m.

    I didn't see in this story where the rate is compared to people that are NOT in the military. I thought I had read in the past that the rate isn't much different than society as a whole. Not that, that makes it good or acceptable, it's probably not a military only thing.

  • atheistswillrule Aug 14, 9:00 a.m.

    The military offers very few mental health support systems to the troops. Over and over they send soldiers who complain of high stress right back out into the war arena with no medication and no professional discussions. As long as they can walk and aim a gun, that's really all the country is concerned about. I don't see why ANYONE would join the military of this country if they have an IQ over 80.

  • AlbertEinstein Aug 14, 8:46 a.m.

    The comprehension level and the need to place "blame" on others within these comments. Let us talk about the stress of battle... when you pull the trigger the first time and see your enemy fall - your stress is consuming. The second time, it is nothing more than a job.

    All jobs have stress to varied degrees. As humans we are influenced by the external variances to be able to interpret these variances to be able to move on or dwell on the past - for example, media, TV, movies, etc.

    Reality is all consuming, while fantasy is nothing more than exercises for our imagination. When we cross the lines and/or confuse these we will find the root of our issues.

  • packalum09 Aug 14, 8:29 a.m.

    I have a friend who, funny enough, served in Afghanistan (and Iraq) and as a cop in Cary...these are his words, not mine "I'll take patrol in Afghanistan any day over blindly answering domestic dispute calls. The first I get to have my weapon at the ready, lock and loaded...the other I have to go into with my hands up hoping the warring parties don't turn on me."
    --affirmativediversity

    This isn't the same. Your friend is merely saying that in one instance, he is able to defend himself from the unexpected whereas in the other, he cannot, and he doesn't like that. His reason for choosing one over the other, according to what you wrote, seems to be more about defending his life than about stress and his ability to cope.

    I do, however, think that more mental health services need to made available to everyone, especially since many of the mass killings involve those with no military background.

  • jjsmith1973 Aug 14, 8:25 a.m.

    @affirmativediversity, laughable. Your Cary cop friend must have been lying. Two there is no place in the u.s. comparable to the middle east. You drive by a deer that is dead on the side of the road in the u.s. you don't fear it blowing up on you. You do with dead animals and people on the side of the roads over there. The fact that you compare cops in the u.s. especially in nc to military overseas is ridiculous, like I said before not even close. Prior service should qualify for mental health services the fact you don't think so show how much experience you have with the military and/or vets that have served in a combat area beyond the confines of the fence line on base. Also you comparison to a hospital in the u.s. compared to a hospital in the middle east is also show you ignorance.

  • grandmagail Aug 14, 8:15 a.m.

    its not the military that causes a person to commit sucide-- it is the unbalanced person them selves-- put the responsability where it belongs SQUARELY ON THE PERSON WHO KILLS THEMSELVES.

    wildpig777

    I don't believe you know what you're talking about. Have you ever had contact with someone who has PTSD? Do you know what a flashback is?

    I live next door to this family and believe me, they have suffered over this. I never speak to Tiffany's mother or father that they don't mention her. Let me tell you, they will never get over this. They don't blame their son-in-law because they know how he has suffered. They hurt for him as well as their daughter.

  • affirmativediversity Aug 13, 7:59 p.m.

    Yes a cop may get that same injury as a soldier but the odds of him getting that injury over a soldier is much different. I work in the triangle now and i don't hear mortars and crams going off in Cary every 45 minutes or air lifts of people missing limbs on a daily basis. Not the same as the middle east not even close and the military and government do need better evaluation and treatment per jjsmith1973

    --------------

    Then you don't patrol anywhere near a hospital with a helipad...and you must work a desk job.

  • gman007 Aug 13, 7:59 p.m.

    If you take a troop of boy scouts and throw them onto a battle field you will see PTSD. think about the training we give our enlistees today vs previous soldiers in earlier wars.

  • affirmativediversity Aug 13, 7:57 p.m.

    "...Affirmative action the fact that you can conclude the two are no different is insane. The number of police officer that face the same environment as soldiers do in the middle east is not even close. The fact you try to make a Cary police officers job sound just as dangerous as an overseas troop is laughable..." per jjsmith1973

    -----------------

    I have a friend who, funny enough, served in Afghanistan (and Iraq) and as a cop in Cary...these are his words, not mine "I'll take patrol in Afghanistan any day over blindly answering domestic dispute calls. The first I get to have my weapon at the ready, lock and loaded...the other I have to go into with my hands up hoping the warring parties don't turn on me."

    Why is it so difficult for people like you to acknowledge that the military do not have a monopoly on stressful jobs, nor should prior military service be a qualification for meaningful mental health service availability.

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