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  • Wingnut Central Sep 8, 2011

    So small government gets to decide who lives and who dies? What a bunch of self righteous hypocrites.

  • JustOneGodLessThanU Sep 7, 2011

    wayneuber, why not address the hard numbers instead of hiding behind a conspiracy theory?

    These are hard numbers. Number of murders. Population of the State. “Murders per Capita” is concrete information and easy to calculate and verify. (if you care to look)

    Fact: Death Penalty states had 4.9 murders per 100,000 people, while non-Death Penalty states had 2.8 murders per 100,000 people.

    I assert that the Death Penalty NOT a deterrant. I proved it by stating national statistics and providing a link to the data.

    Refute that if you can. IMO, you’re not going to like what you see...but sometimes the truth hurts. And, what you do with that truth (deny, obfuscate, dodge) shows us what kind of person you are.

  • CharmedLife Sep 6, 2011

    What a waste of taxpayer money. Death by natural causes on death row? What is wrong with that picture?
    Stand-In-The-Door

    I'm gonna have to agree with stand-in-th-door on this one! How does one get placed on death row for so long and then die of natural causes? There goes my hard earned taxes!

  • jurydoc Sep 6, 2011

    "Some crimes cry out for the death penalty in being so heinous it would be a crime to let that person live, enjoy tv, laugh at jokes and have even a life in prison."

    Maybe so, but the difficulty comes in making the determination of which crimes those are. There is no consensus, prosecutors have discretion on which cases are tried capitally. The process used for deciding on the DP is so fraught with bias and human error so as to call its fairness into question. Thus, we are left with no reliable or objective method to make the determination you seek. In the absence of such a method, it is best to do without the punishment altogether.

  • warbirdlover Sep 6, 2011

    These are old laws still on the books back from the old days, like back before 1900. No I'm not saying that on a whole the US is not civilized, just parts of it, where mostly so called Christians, howl for the Death Penalty. I thought Christians were all about forgivness of ones Sins. Does this not apply to all Sins??? Are the Sins Catagorised??? Are the only Sins to be foriven are the ones that make you and the church feel better, or have a direct meaning to you.

  • Stand-In-The-Door Sep 6, 2011

    What a waste of taxpayer money. Death by natural causes on death row? What is wrong with that picture?

  • citizensoldier16 Sep 6, 2011

    14 years on death row? How much of our taxes did THAT waste? The state needs to speed things up...maybe that'll improve our fiscal position in this state.

  • ghimmy51 Sep 6, 2011

    Some crimes cry out for the death penalty in being so heinous it would be a crime to let that person live, enjoy tv, laugh at jokes and have even a life in prison.

  • ghimmy51 Sep 6, 2011

    Warbirdlover, you have been reading too many unofficial websites. NC has no common law marriage of any kind. You can live your whole life claiming to be married (even in motels) and you are NOT married.

  • ghimmy51 Sep 6, 2011

    I personally do not care about the social life of criminals. I do not care about their sad childhood. The ONLY thing I care about criminals is that the system be SURE they got the right person and then execute sentence without delay, whatever it may be, and make it stick. That's the justice system's duty to the rest of us. Anything less is not justice.

  • nclevi Sep 6, 2011

    Warbirdlover, are you honestly claiming that the United States is not civilized because several states have a death penalty? Really? That's an extreme statement that has no place in civil discourse.

  • are you kidding me Sep 6, 2011

    Hunter38...go brother!!!

  • kerrane Sep 6, 2011

    Hunter38 "I LOVE WHAT YOU SAID"

  • warbirdlover Sep 6, 2011

    The Death Penalty has been banned in all civilized countries. Why does certain States still act like it is the Spanish Inquision. Get real folks it's the 21st century not the 16th century. You would think that we have advanced enough to see that not all laws are good laws and cring for blood, makes you no better than the criminal!!!. Did you know it is illegal in NC to do the following! To plow your Cotton field with an Elephant, If a man and a woman who aren’t married go to a hotel/motel and register themselves as married then, according to state law, they are legally married, Persons in possession of illegal substances must pay taxes on them. So watch out.

  • smcallah Sep 6, 2011

    "If you did your crime and didn't think about how inhumane it was for your victim then why should I care one little bit about your rights? Give me one valid, good reason."

    Because you live in a free country that was built on principles of justice that you seem to be against. If you want to live in a country like that, there are many 3rd world countries you can choose from that do treat people accused of crimes in just this way. You should migrate to one of those countries, make life better for the rest of us.

  • hunter38 Sep 6, 2011

    NC doesn't need a death row....we need a guy standing by the power switch yelling NEXT !!!!

  • NoObamaCare Sep 6, 2011

    "costs more to execute someone than hold them for life in prison." - Not if we go back to public hangings! That will put a strong image in everyone's mind not to commit crimes! You get 1 appeal then drop the bottom out of the floor.

  • smcallah Sep 6, 2011

    "smcallah.......not true!"

    Yes, TRUE. My god, it said so in the information you posted that it was only in affect for sentences between 1974 and 1977. After that, anyone sentenced serves their life in prison.

    You should go back and read what you posted so that you understand it yourself.

  • schoonie79 Sep 6, 2011

    "Love these types of comments. So what you're saying is that, as a society, our behavior should be no better than the worst among our citizenry???"

    Yep pretty much. Would you rather I take pity on the rapists, child molesters, murderers and the like? Society has deemed these people as unsuitable to be among us. How about we round them all up and bring them to your house. Will that make it easier for you to sleep at night knowing that they are living it up on your dime?

    As a convicted felon, you have many rights taken away. How about the right to be treated humanely? If you did your crime and didn't think about how inhumane it was for your victim then why should I care one little bit about your rights? Give me one valid, good reason.

  • jurydoc Sep 6, 2011

    "The Death Penalty Information Center is a stakeholder in the death penalty argument. Using statistics that only look at a limited number of costs and reasons for applying the death penalty results in flawed information and false conclusions."

    If you look, the DPIC is NOT the author of most of the research it reports on its website. It is merely the repository. And what is "only looking at a limited number of costs?" The costs to prosecute a death case and carry it to execution are what they are. They include adjudication, appeals, incarceration and execution. The entire network set up to accomplish this is expensive and all of the costs associated with it are legitimately included when discussing the costs associated with an execution.

  • jurydoc Sep 6, 2011

    To the issue of costs -- having the DP on the books sets up an entire system of safeguards and procedures to avoid executing an innocent person. The costs associated with that system are what people are citing when discussing that it "costs more to execute someone than hold them for life in prison." It is NOT merely the costs of punishment at issue. It is ALL the costs of adjudication, appeals, AND punishment that must be considered as these are the costs associated with implementation of the DP when a state decides to have it on the books. And if you want to do away with the appeals, simply be aware that as you do so, you increase the chances of executing an innocent person.

  • jurydoc Sep 6, 2011

    "States like VA and TX set a much better example on how to perform executions in a more timely and efficient manner."

    OMG, I hope you're kidding or simply ignorant of the history of executions in Texas. There is a high likelihood that TX has executed more than one innocent person. And they may be headed for more. http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/evidence-still-not-tested-dna-texas-attorneys-move-halt-execution and http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/only-texas-inmate-not-resentenced-after-admittedly-racially-biased-testimony-faces-execution

    To hold up the state of TX as an "example on how to perform executions in a more timely and efficient manner" would be laughable if the issue of lives was not at stake.

  • NoObamaCare Sep 6, 2011

    Hopefully a few more inmates on death row kick the bucket..either naturally or lethal injection...we need to start somewhere with budget cuts...why not start with the obvious one!!

  • poolsnake Sep 6, 2011

    I wonder what it costed me to feed him for the past 14 years .

  • wayneuber Sep 6, 2011

    Just because a few are falsely accused or get less than they deserve doesn't mean that all capital murderers should avoid a legal execution.

    Readers: Objective information does not come from persons and groups whose duty requires them to act on behalf of their clients (accused of capital crimes or on death row). The Death Penalty Information Center is a stakeholder in the death penalty argument. Using statistics that only look at a limited number of costs and reasons for applying the death penalty results in flawed information and false conclusions. Using anecdotal accounts to make a point doesn't prove anything either.

    A more balanced point of view would include enforcement of the laws we have on the books and a streamlining of a burdensome and expensive appeals process. States like VA and TX set a much better example on how to perform executions in a more timely and efficient manner.

  • poolsnake Sep 6, 2011

    He should have died 14 years ago !! All this ,,,poor him stuff ,,what about the person he killed !

  • OMGReally Sep 6, 2011

    Good Idea Pat7!

  • pat7 Sep 6, 2011

    What a waste of money keeping him on death row. Cost to much money,Start harvesting there organs to people that needs them,that would solve a lot of over crowding in jails/prision.
    And what a good cause to. .Is this to harsh because they took a life why dont they give life .

  • scfair Sep 6, 2011

    If a family member of yours was the victim, would you be satisfied? Hell no!

  • JustOneGodLessThanU Sep 6, 2011

    While many people may *like* the idea of the government killing someone... According to the hard data, the death penalty does *not* reduce or deter murders...quite the opposite, in fact.

    2009 Murder Rates (per 100,000 people):

    “Death Penalty States” was 4.9 murders per 100,000 ppl

    “Non-Death Penalty States” was 2.8 murders per 100,000 ppl

    Statistically, you're 75% more likely to be murdered in a state that has the death penalty than in a state without it.

    www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/murder-rates-nationally-and-state

  • scfair Sep 6, 2011

    Life in prison seems to cost a lot more than the death penalty!

  • JustOneGodLessThanU Sep 6, 2011

    Notable NC Death Penalty Exonerations

    #3
    Levon "Bo" Jones' conviction was overturned due to his defense counsel's "constitutionally deficient" performance. In April 2008, shortly before a retrial was set to begin, Jones' new defense team filed an affidavit in which the star witness from his first trial said, "Much of what I testified to was simply not true." Jones spent 15 years on death row, and was released in May 2008

  • JustOneGodLessThanU Sep 6, 2011

    Notable NC Death Penalty Exonerations

    #2
    Glen Edward Chapman was granted a new trial in 2007, due to withheld evidence, “lost, misplaced or destroyed” documents, the use of weak, circumstantial evidence, false testimony by the lead investigator, and ineffective assistance of defense counsel. There was also new information from a forensic pathologist that raised doubts as to whether the murder for which Chapman was convicted was a homicide or caused by an overdose of drugs. Chapman was released in 2008, when charges against him were dropped.

  • JustOneGodLessThanU Sep 6, 2011

    Notable NC Death Penalty Exonerations

    #1
    Jonathon Hoffman, a black man charged with killing a white man, was tried and convicted by an all-white jury despite the fact that no physical evidence connected him to the murder of Danny Cook. The prosecutors in his case withheld evidence that was favorable to Hoffman. Neither the defense attorney nor the judge knew of a deal in which prosecutors paid Hoffman's cousin to testify against him—an omission that resulted in the criminal investigation of Ken Honeycutt and Scott Brewer, the prosecutors in the original trial. Charges were dismissed in 2007, after Hoffman had spent 12 years on death row.

  • Rebelyell55 Sep 6, 2011

    14 years? talk about cruel punishment. He should of had the needle 13 years ago.

  • aquamarine46 Sep 6, 2011

    smcallah.......not true!

  • aquamarine46 Sep 6, 2011

    @wildcat......The state's Fair Sentencing Act of 1981 allowed for the prisoners to reduce their time in jail. This act had a retroactive provision that allowed those sentenced to life between 1974 and 1977 to cut the life sentence in half to 40 years. The Act also allowed for them to reduce their jail time for good behavior and other credits they could earn.

    Basically, inmates can earn a day off of their sentencing for everyday of good behavior. They can also earn credits to reduce their jail time for participating in a work or other program activities. If they receive an infraction, then they can take away some of the credits they have earned.

    The reason these 20 inmates are going to be release and dozens more in the coming years, is because one of the inmates took the state to court over the laws mentioned above and won. In 1975, Bobby Bowden murdered two Fayetteville men and was convicted to life.
    OK.....maybe it doesn't include death row, but still, life doesn't always mean life

  • Gerbil Herder Sep 6, 2011

    "Reference?"

    Google "Death Penalty v Life In Prison"

  • vandykebrune Sep 6, 2011

    I believe good behavior credits to sentencing went out a number of years ago, when each crime was given a sentencing period of time to which the judge must adhere.

  • Arapaloosa Sep 6, 2011

    "death penalty costs North Carolina $2.16 million more "

    Reference? I'm curious as to WHY the costs are higher to pursue DP. I still have a hard time believing that housing, feeding, clothing and healthcare for 40-60 years is cheaper. This guy was only in for 14, but a lot of them are in for a WHOLE lot longer.

  • rcrdngcountry Sep 6, 2011

    THIS IS NOT NEWS. WE KNOW MOST ON DEATH ROW WILL DIE FROM
    NATURAL CAUSES IN OR OUT OF PRISON IN NORTH CAROLINA,

  • wildcat Sep 6, 2011

    Where will his funeral service be and what time? Some here would like to know so that they will be able to attend.

  • wildcat Sep 6, 2011

    Thanks so much for allowing my comments. I am on a timer at the library so I do hope you understand.

  • smcallah Sep 6, 2011

    "Life in prison is not necessarily a "death sentence" when they can earn "good behavior points" and get out early. If Life really meant Life, that would be different."

    Life without the possibility of parole are what these sentences are. No one with a life sentence is getting good behavior credit and getting out of prison. No one.

    That is for people with lighter sentences and helps them lead to being paroled sooner.

    That is not an option for people with life sentences. Don't make things up, please.

  • wildcat Sep 6, 2011

    comments please? thanks.

  • wildcat Sep 6, 2011

    Even in death, many are still not satisfied.

  • wildcat Sep 6, 2011

    when they can earn "good behavior points" and get out early.

    No one is getting out early in prison becaue of good behaviour points. Bring us the name of those freed and allow us to check it out ourselves.

  • finwearer Sep 6, 2011

    A jury's sentence of "death" should be just that... and NOT by natural causes. You will never convince me that it was cheaper to clothe, house, feed and provide medical care for 14 years to this "sentenced" individual, than it would have been to follow through with his sentence. I'm all for installing "electric BENCHES"...and do some major house cleaning in our prison system. I'm sick and tired of the low life "people" that have been convicted and sentenced getting better care and more consideration than those of us that break our backs to make an honest living and live within the dictates of society.

  • aquamarine46 Sep 6, 2011

    @traydevon - Life in prison is not necessarily a "death sentence" when they can earn "good behavior points" and get out early. If Life really meant Life, that would be different.

  • anne53ozzy Sep 6, 2011

    Hope everyone is happy now...I would be surprised if the family felt any today or if they may have years ago had he been executed.

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