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Selma businessmen again face federal gambling charges

Posted August 12, 2015

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— A federal grand jury has indicted a father and son from Selma and their business on charges they ran an illegal sweepstakes operation.

David Ricky Godwin Sr., 68, David Ricky Godwin Jr. 44, and Regional Amusements Inc. were indicted last week on one count each of criminal conspiracy and conducting an illegal gambling business, two counts of engaging in a gambling device business without registering, four counts of failing to maintain a record of gambling devices and 13 counts of possession of unmarked gambling devices.

The charges come more than a year after state and federal agents raided Godwin Music, on N.C. Highway 39 outside Selma, and two homes associated with his family.

In subsequent months, authorities seized gaming devices and cash from close to 200 stores and restaurants across eastern North Carolina that they contended were linked to the Godwins and a $20 million illegal gambling enterprise. Many of those cases were later dropped.

The Godwins were convicted in 2004 in connection with an illegal gambling ring. The son received probation, and the father went to prison until 2011.

As part of the new indictment, federal authorities are seeking the forfeiture of the seized devices and any proceeds linked to activities found to be illegal.

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  • Charles Boyer Aug 13, 2015
    user avatar

    The government really doesn't like it when someone tries to grab a piece of their gambling monopoly. They send in their muscle and take care of the problem.

    On the other hand, after being tried and convicted for similar charges, what were these two thinking? That they'd get away with it...this time?

  • Wayne Boyd Aug 12, 2015
    user avatar

    This is no more a sham than the lottery. What's good for the goose should also be good for the gander. Both play on the hopes of the desperate and poor.