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Roommate: Man 'going crazy' before dying in Raleigh police custody

Posted September 14, 2015
Updated September 15, 2015

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— A Raleigh man who died in police custody early Monday was "going crazy," possibly breaking in to a home before attacking his roommate, the roommate said in a 911 call.

Carl Devince King, 52, was taken into custody in the 3000 block of Slippery Elm Drive, behind Southeast Raleigh Magnet High School, at about 5:30 a.m. when police responded to a report of a disturbance. He died a short time later.

Cassandra Morris said she called 911 for help when King started acting irrationally at a nearby home.

"He’s going hysterical. He’s going crazy," Morris told the 911 dispatcher. "I don’t know if he broke into these people’s house, kicked the door in. He keeps slamming the door."

Later in the call, Morris begins screaming.

"Oh Lord, please don’t do me. Oh God, stop. Don’t do that. Calm down. Please stop," she said.

Before the call disconnects, Morris can be heard talking to someone in a calmer tone, telling the person she would get some water.

Morris later told WRAL News that King had been drinking and taking medications and "just snapped."

"He was just running through the house yelling. I was trying to calm him down, trying to get him a shower, but the shower didn't do him no good," she said.

Carl King had previously been charged with assault on a female and resisting an officer. He had been scheduled to appear in court next Monday on an assault charge from July.

Police have been called to the home more than a dozen times over the past two years, according to Raleigh Police Department records, including calls for an attempted suicide and domestic assaults.

King was swinging a lamp around Monday morning and broke it, Morris said. When police arrived, King was on the ground with broken glass from the lamp, she said.

"They had him on glass on his back. So, he was just like, 'I can't breathe. I can't breathe. I'm out of my mind,'" she said.

King's sister, Mary Maddox, described him as the youngest of nine siblings, who had four children of his own and three grandchildren with another on the way. He was a catering worker who was in relative good health, she said.

Maddox said she planned to talk to police about what happened.

"What I'm understanding is that he died due to police activity," said King's son, Carlos King.

Police spokesman Jim Sughrue declined to speculate on King's cause of death.

Master Officer S.A. Brown, Senior Officer A.L. Council, Officer C.J. Flagler, Officer A.J. Williams and Sgt. D.R. Williams have been placed on administrative duty pending the outcome of a State Bureau of Investigation review of the incident, which is standard procedure. The Raleigh Police Department is conducting its own internal investigation to determine whether officers followed policy.

4 Comments

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  • gayleling Sep 18, 2015

    police are not to blame here. The man was doing a somewhat NEW drug called FLAKKA. It causes extreme reactions, your body temperature to rise to about 105 which explains being nude & sweating profusely. It's a type of crystal meth that is being made to look like gummy bears. It is epidemic in Florida with over a 200% rise in hospital/police incidents since last year. Its cheap to get and DEADLY... BAD NEWS DRUG

  • Marcy Lyn Sep 15, 2015
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    "What I'm understanding is that he died due to police activity," said King's son, Carlos King.

    Wait for it... Wait for it.. Here comes a lawsuit... LOL His son is looking for money.

  • Steve Sanders Sep 15, 2015
    user avatar

    I wouldn't expect any different from WRAL! The police would not have been there if he hadn't been intoxicated and raising cain!

  • Deanna Davis Sep 14, 2015
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    WRAL I'm disappointed in you. Interviewing someone on camera that claims the man died "due to police activity". We don't need more inciting anger and bias against police.