Nate Johnson

WRAL meteorologist Nate Johnson

Meteorologist/executive producer

Professional Experience:
November 2007 to present: meteorologist/executive producer, WRAL-TV; 2011 to present: meteorology lecturer at North Carolina State University; August 2006 to November 2007: data services meteorologist, Baron Services, Huntsville, Ala.; May 2000 to July 2006: meteorologist/chief meteorologist, KTXS-TV, Abilene, Texas; May 1999 to May 2000: intern/meteorologist, WRAL-TV

Awards & Recognition:
2016: Regional Edward R. Murrow Award, Documentary for O-Fishel Quest: Exploring Climate Change;

2015: Regional Emmy Nominations for Weather, Newscast/Morning, and Informational/Instructional (NATAS Nashville/Mid-South Chapter);

2015: RTDNAC Award, News Documentary (Radio Television Digital News Association of the Carolinas); Regional Emmy Award, Breaking News (NATAS Nashville/Mid-South Chapter);

2014: Regional Emmy Award, Newscast/Weekend (NATAS Nashville/Mid-South Chapter).

2013: Best weather reporting (North Carolina AP Broadcasters);

2012: National Emmy nomination, Breaking News (National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences); AP Award, Best Weather (North Carolina AP Broadcasters); Regional Edward R. Murrow Award, Continuing Coverage (Radio Television Digital News Association); Regional Emmy, Breaking News (NATAS Nashville/Mid-South Chapter); 2011: Regional Emmy Nomination, Weather (NATAS Nashville/Mid-South Chapter);

2006: Certified Broadcast Meteorologist (American Meteorological Society); Best Local TV Weather Person (Abilene Reporter-News Readers’ Choice);

2005: Best Local TV Weather Person (Abilene Reporter-News Readers’ Choice), Seal of Approval for TV Weathercasting (National Weather Association);

2003: Best Team Coverage – 2002 Floods (Texas AP Broadcasters Division III)

News Philosophy:
Content is king, but presentation absolutely matters – especially when it comes to big-impact weather events. The most accurate forecast is worthless if we can’t connect the weather (“What’s going to happen?”) to its impacts on people (“What’s going to happen to me?”).

Education:
Bachelor of Science in Meteorology, 1999, North Carolina State University; Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, 2000, North Carolina State University; Master of Science in Communication, 2013, North Carolina State University

Birthplace:
Winston-Salem, N.C.

Hobbies, Interests & Community Involvement:
I am a private pilot and enjoy spending time flying around, exploring our region, and meeting new people. (I enjoy traveling generally, too, even when I can’t fly there myself!)  I’m a huge NC State and Chicago Cubs fan, and I enjoy watching other sports, as well.  And I enjoy a good plate of barbecue – just don’t try to argue about which is best… I like it all.

Favorite Websites:
WRAL.com, College of DuPage weather (weather.cod.edu), Penn State E-Wall (www.meteo.psu.edu/~fxg1/ewall.html), Nieman Journalism lab (www.niemanlab.org), Digital Meteorologist (digitalmeteorologist.com), Bold Method (boldmethod.com), Flying Magazine (flyingmag.com).

Likes Best About North Carolina:
Aside from being my home, I enjoy North Carolina's unique geographic and meteorological diversity. In a single day, you can watch the sun rise over the Atlantic Ocean and watch it set over the Blue Ridge while enjoying a leisurely drive across some beautiful countryside in between. If the weather's right, you could also swim in the ocean and get snowed on in the same day, too.

Most Memorable Assignments:
April 16th, 2011. That day just felt wrong from the moment I got up, and after one of the biggest tornado outbreaks in North Carolina history, we now know why. I am proud of the work my colleagues did that day, but it serves as an inspiration and reminder that we can always do better, aim higher, and strive further.

Hurricane Floyd. For one, Floyd was the first (of many!) all-nighters I’ve worked as a meteorologist covering hurricanes, tornadoes and snowstorms. I will never forget the Sky 5 video of the flooding the next day, especially the image of so many pigs – the lucky ones, that is – that had managed to float to the roof to ride out the flooding.