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Go Ask Mom

Recipe: Natural dyes for Easter eggs

Posted April 17, 2014

The Chapel Hill Farmers' Market will host a unique egg hunt on Saturday. 

Farm fresh hard boiled eggs will be hidden around the market in all colors, shapes and sizes. Once kids find their eggs, they can take it to a dye station where they can experiment using dyes made of natural ingredients like turmeric and onion skins. 

The market at University Mall, 201 S. Estes Dr., is open 8 a.m. to noon, Saturdays. The egg hunt begins at 10 a.m., Saturday. 

The natural dyes intrigued me. So I asked Ali Rudel, the market manager, for more information. Here's what Rudel shared: 

For each of these recipes you can achieve rich, vibrant colors by hard boiling your eggs in the finished dyes. Otherwise you will achieve paler colors from dipping pre-hard boiled eggs (like we'll have at market) in the cooled dyes.

The longer you leave the eggs in the dyes, the more intense the colors will be. The original color of the egg will also play a part. We'll have a variety of very light brown to brown eggs and blue eggs at market, so it will be fun to see how each takes the color. You can also experiment with putting rubber bands around the eggs or using white crayons to block colors.

For blue eggs
Quarter a head of red cabbage and place in a 4-quart or larger pot. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Allow the cabbage to simmer for 30 minutes then add 1 tablespoon white vinegar. Strain the cabbage out, leaving only the liquid, and add 1 tablespoon of baking soda, stirring to dissolve.

For yellow eggs
Mix 6 tablespoons of turmeric powder into 6 cups of water in a 4-quart or larger pot. Bring to a simmer, allowing the powder to dissolve. Add 1 tablespoon each of vinegar and salt.

For pink eggs
Cut up one pound of beets and place in a 4-quart or larger pot. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Allow the beets to simmer for 30 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon each of white vinegar and salt. Strain the beets out, leaving only the liquid.

For red or lavender eggs
Peel the skins from three to four red onions and place the skins in a 4-quart or larger pot. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Allow the skins to simmer for 30 minutes. Add 1 tablespoon each of white vinegar and salt. Strain the skins out, leaving only the liquid.

Go Ask Mom shares recipes every Friday. For more, check WRAL.com's recipe database.

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  • rogty2525 Apr 18, 2014

    On the lighter side...

    "Top 10 Rejected Easter Fertility Symbols"

    Here comes Peter CottonFAIL!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWYwyy2xEmo