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Rabies notice issued for northeast Raleigh

Posted November 1, 2011
Updated November 2, 2011

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— A cat with rabies came in contact with at least two people in northeast Raleigh, Wake County public health officials said Tuesday.

Anyone who might have had contact with a cat near the intersection of Holly Ridge Farm Road and Buffaloe Road should be on alert for the symptoms of rabies, they said.

The people who were known to have interacted with the cat received post-exposure vaccinations.

Anyone who sees an animal behaving in an unusual way is urged to call Wake County Animal Control at 919-212-7387.

Anyone who is bitten or scratched by an unknown or possibly infected animal should thoroughly clean the wound with soap and warm water and seek medical attention. Wake County Community Health can be reached at 919-250-4462 during the day and 919-839-3059 after hours.

Animal control officials offered these tips for rabies safety:

  • Do not approach unknown animals.
  • Keep pets up-to-date on rabies vaccinations.
  • Do not feed stray or unknown animals, including cats and dogs.
  • Do not leave food or trash outside, unless it is in a trash can with a tight-fitting lid.
  • If a pet is fed outside, do not leave food out overnight.
  • Do not leave pets outdoors unattended.
  • Report any animals that are behaving unusually to authorities immediately.
6 Comments

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  • dianedmdr Nov 2, 2011

    Trap Neuter return programs are the answer to the issues raised here... rabies in wildlife transmitted by free roaming cats, humane treatment of free roaming cats, overpopulation in shelters, high euthanasia rates, and can be a significant savings. Please see the web address below for details, but briefly... According to the Best Friends Animal Society and the tool on their website ( created by the firm noted) here's the estimated savings!!!!!!!!! Almost 7 million dollars. This money could certainly be better spent on the school system or other community needs.

    Estimated Savings in Raleigh, North Carolina with Discounted Sterilization & TNR
    (Cost of Eradication x Number of Free-Roaming Cats - Discounted TNR x Number of Free-Roaming Cats) $6,770,500
    John Dunham and Associates: New York
    http://www.guerrillaeconomics.biz/communitycats/

  • melissa903 Nov 2, 2011

    The issue here is not attacking stray and feral cats, this cat was probably infected with rabies from the main wild animal carriers of the virus, such as raccoons, bats, foxes and skunks. The solution is not to shoot free-roaming cats and it is sad that there are still ignorant people out there that believe this. More people need to be responsible pet owners and vaccinate their pets regularly- indoor & outdoor. Also, if more efforts for Trap Neuter Return of feral (free-roaming cats born in the wild) were supported then more cats would be vaccinated against rabies and therefore would be protected which would prevent public health scares and outbreaks. Furthermore, for the people upset about songbirds, this is not even related to rabies, but if more feral cats were fixed and returned to managed colonies, then the cat population eventually decreases over time so there are fewer predators for the birds. Everyone wins. The main issue here is education about rabies and feral cat management.

  • pooodaddy Nov 2, 2011

    If we were allowed to shoot cats roaming around neighborhoods, we wouldn't have this problem. If you can't keep your cat contained, fixed, and vaccinated; you shouldn't be allowed to have said animal anymore.

  • ncdixie1 Nov 2, 2011

    "The only way to control and contain these outbreaks is to make these innoculations affordable to all with the condition that neutering is required. These clinics are afforded once or twice a year in rural areas for innoculation but not for neutering. The proliferation of the cat population is out of control internationally as well as locally. Songbirds, those that are not raptors, are dying off at alarming rates due to cat attacks on the species and they do kill them for food but by nature."
    anne53ozzy November 1, 2011 6:35 p.m.

    Great post! Thank you for the info on the songbirds, had no idea.

  • anne53ozzy Nov 1, 2011

    The only way to control and contain these outbreaks is to make these innoculations affordable to all with the condition that neutering is required. These clinics are afforded once or twice a year in rural areas for innoculation but not for neutering. The proliferation of the cat population is out of control internationally as well as locally. Songbirds, those that are not raptors, are dying off at alarming rates due to cat attacks on the species and they do kill them for food but by nature.

  • DukeFan23 Nov 1, 2011

    That would be Holly Ridge Farm Road and Buffaloe Road...