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Push for 'puppy mill' bill renewed

Posted March 4, 2015

— Animal advocates gathered at the Legislative Building on Wednesday to ask lawmakers to regulate so-called "puppy mills."

Similar bills have failed in every legislative session for years, but one Raleigh couple said they hope their four-legged lobbyist can turn the tide.

Bee is a little cuter than the average lobbyist, but you would never guess she came from a rough background. She was removed from a Stokes County puppy mill in 2011, where she lived in a filthy chicken-wire pen in a gutted trailer with no heat.

"Rats would go inside the trailer, and (the dogs) would fight rats for the food. Some of the dogs had rat bites," said Jennifer Senechal, who adopted Bee.

Senechal and her husband said lawmakers need to require commercial dog breeders to meet basic needs such as food, water and veterinary care for their animals.

"We're here to advocate on behalf of all the dogs that are still in the mills, on behalf of all the dogs that are still in the deplorable conditions that she was in," she said of Bee.

Twenty-one puppy mills have been busted in North Carolina since 2011, with more than 1,600 dogs removed from them.

House lawmakers passed a puppy mill bill last year, but the Senate refused to take it up. House leaders say they will try again this year.

Justin Senechal blamed industry lobbyists for repeatedly defeating attempts to regulate large breeding operations.

"There's a lot of money coming from the opposition, I guess – agriculture groups and the (American Kennel Club) has been against it – and it's just a no brainer to me," he said.

The AKC says regulation would unfairly target good breeders, but supporters say good breeders have nothing to worry about – unlike Bee and other dogs.

"They're creatures too," Jennifer Senechal said. "They deserve to be kept and cared for, and the bill needs to be passed because there needs to be at least minimum standards."

10 Comments

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  • Matt Wood Mar 6, 2015
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    Most of the time you're not talking about litters being seized, but rather the breeding adult dogs (the puppies have already been shipped off). Regardless of the number, if they're being held in deplorable conditions, fighting rats for food, diseased, malnourished, etc. (as they were found to be in ALL of these cases, or law enforcement wouldn't have agreed to intervene) then they deserve to be shut down.

  • Andi Rueny Mar 6, 2015
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    1,600 puppies from 21 mills equates to 76 puppies per "mill". The average litter is usually 6 to 8 puppies and most have at least 3 females breeding. At most you are talking about 4 litters per female, "if" the animals are taken care of, I would hardly call that a bad thing.

  • Clarence Hill Mar 5, 2015
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    Matt:
    There you go again, using that vulgar cuss word. Watch your mouth, we're in mixed company. As you say, I probably have some mental issues--but feel very comfortable that there are enough like minded folks over on Jones Street to see through this deceptive HSUS ARs sham. (What's your problem?) By the way--it's not AKC and the pork people that keep blocking your ARs efforts--It's the HSUS/PETA "death kiss".

  • Matt Wood Mar 5, 2015
    user avatar

    Yup, it seems Clarence Hill is the same person who wrote this error-laden opinion article that uses nothing but supposition and has no facts to back up your claims:

    http://www.clintonnc.com/news/letters-opinion/4714962/Case-not-just-about-dogs

  • Matt Wood Mar 5, 2015
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    Anyone who thinks the words "puppy mill" is a slur clearly has mental issues (or owns one themselves). There is nothing wrong with ensuring commercial breeders adhere to a set of standards - why should they get a pass when so many other industries don't?

    As for who gets compensated for the animals, I think you'll find that the rescues only charge a nominal fee to cover the medical/food/housing costs of fostering the animal until it's adopted. If all you're worried about is what the animal is worth - and not its welfare - then that says far more about your own personal failures.

  • Clarence Hill Mar 5, 2015
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    Matt
    The correct term is "Commercial Dog breeders". Your mamma should wash your mouth out with soap--for using the "profane" slur. SHAME ON YOU.

    ARs folk seem to think that that it's illegal and immoral to breed and sell nice "purebred" companion animals. People have a right to own an animal of their choice. Commercial Breeders did not cause the overfill at the animal shelters.

    What was the value of those 1600 vigilante seized dogs, $2+ million? What was the sale prices after aeizure? Who got the money? Did the breeders get any compensation.

    Keep up your PR efforts. The more the "powers-that-be" learn about the deceptive HSUS--the easier it will be to recognize the HSUS/PETA "death-kiss' that touches any HSUS proposed legislation. The sad part is the waste of time and money it take to consider, debate and kill these radical HSUS bills

  • Matt Wood Mar 5, 2015
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    View quoted thread


    Wow, equating "puppy mill" with the "N" word??? You need some serious help. Whats else do you call someone who breeds large numbers of puppies? One of the definitions of "mill" is "one that produces or processes people or things mechanically or in large numbers." Thus, puppy mill is accurate. I mean 1,600 puppies from 21 mills alone, when there are millions of perfectly adoptable puppies in the shelters. And the puppies suffer horrible conditions. Horrendous! You should be ashamed of yourself for protecting those practices, especially for protecting the Stokes County puppy mill Bee came from, which had 150 dogs. One need only do a simple google search to see the deplorable conditions they were in.

  • Clarence Hill Mar 5, 2015
    user avatar

    Roy:
    Nope, just facts.

  • Roy Hinkley Mar 5, 2015
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    @Clarence:
    That's parody, right?

  • Clarence Hill Mar 4, 2015
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    Look at the beautiful dog, "Bee". Don't forget that the Stokes county breeder bred and owned "Bee". Bee was taken/stolen in a raid, led by the animal rights (ARs) vigilante group HSUS and then sold to the new owner. How much was Bee sold for? Did the breeder get any of the sale money?

    Let's define the term "puppy mill". To call the Stokes County breeder a "puppy mill" is to "willfully and immorally slur, slander, degrade, insult, defame, harm and cause monetary damage to these good breeders. "Puppy mill" is a radical, immoral social slur designed by ARs folks (HSUS,?) to dehumanize dog breeders as was its older brother/sister the "N" word was used to degrade and defame our Black friends in past years. There's no such thing as a "puppy mill". SHAME on anyone that would ever let this term fall from their lips again.

    To our NCGA members--thank you for your wise public service. You served NC well as you killed the Radical HSUS's "hidden agenda" efforts to harm our Great State.