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@NCCapitol

Protesters prepare for legislators return

Posted September 1, 2013
Updated September 2, 2013

— Leaders of the so-called "Moral Monday" movement planned to bring their grievances about state legislation they call "extreme and immoral" back to the state capital this week as lawmakers convene for a veto-override session.

Officials with the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP, the North Carolina AFL-CIO and the Farm Labor Organizing Committee used the Labor Day holiday to point out how lawmakers' actions have hurt both workers and those out of work across the state.

"No injustice is greater than this legislature's treatment of the unemployed," Mary McMillan, state director of the AFL-CIO, said during a news conference. "What our legislators did was not just wrong, it was deliberately cruel, it was morally reprehensible."

Lawmakers overhauled the state unemployment system to repay $2.5 billion borrowed from the federal government to pay jobless claims during the recession. In slashing the size and duration of state benefits, North Carolina also lost out on six months of federal benefits to long-term unemployed.

Mary McMillan, AFL-CIO president Groups say lawmakers hurt NC workers, jobless

The NAACP led protests of the actions of the Republican-controlled General Assembly throughout the recent legislative session, resulting in more than 900 arrests. Since the session's end, protests have taken place in Asheville, Charlotte and elsewhere.

Lawmakers will return Tuesday to try and override two vetoes by Gov. Pat McCrory – one on legislation that would  require drug testing for those seeking certain kinds of welfare and another on a bill expanding the definition of "seasonal labor" that don't need an immigration status check.

Both measures passed the House and Senate by wide margins, and legislative leaders say they expect lawmakers to pass the bills despite the governor's objections. If all members are present and voting, that would require 72 votes in the 120-member House and 30 votes in the 50-member Senate.

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  • goldenosprey Sep 4, 2013

    "How long can protests go on , before they are considered Harassment ? These so called protests sure show the signs of Harassment to me !" GK N.Ral

    Perhaps you would be more comfortable in a fascist dictatorship.

    The protests are peaceful and non-violent. It's funny that the rightie regulars have such a visceral hatred for those who disagree they resort to unAmerican sentiments and ad hominems.

  • GK N.Ral Sep 4, 2013

    While I support some of your causes, as long as you are breaking the law, I can not support you. Obey the law or change the law, do not disobey the law.

  • nailman5204 Sep 3, 2013

    How long can protests go on , before they are considered Harassment ? These so called protests sure show the signs of Harassment to me ! Why don't they go to Washington and protest Obamacare- Oh, wasn't thinking--dumb question !!

  • beaupeep Sep 3, 2013

    Easy, sisu. Somebody asked how/if they were organized. I answered.

    You've been there for the closed door, secret "no media allowed - legal instruction" portion of the organization meeting and KNOW what instructions they're given?

    Yeah, I thought not.

  • sisu Sep 3, 2013

    They are highly organized thru liberal social media and other online sites. The are told what to do and how to get arrested. They are cautioned not to speak to anyone or volunteer to be arrested if they are from out-of-state. The sites used to b easily found, but they have gone underground lately.
    beaupeep
    September 3, 2013 7:00 p.m.

    Okay, first of all, welcome to the 21st century. Of course they are mostly organized on social media and online.

    And to your second part about the out-of-state thing... that's just ridiculous. No one (including out-of-staters) are told not to "talk to anyone". As far as being arrested I (who have been on the insidious social media) have never seen anything telling out-of-staters not to be arrested. I have definitely heard them recommending against it for people whose jobs would be jeapordized, etc.

    I wouldn't personally recommend getting arrested out of state no matter what state you're in, but only due to distance issues and family obligations.

  • Billy the Kid Sep 3, 2013

    I guess they didn't use that time to find jobs or do anything productive.

  • beaupeep Sep 3, 2013

    "I am interested in how these groups get together to protest. Is this a random coalition or are they sponsored." tatermommy52

    They are highly organized thru liberal social media and other online sites. The are told what to do and how to get arrested. They are cautioned not to speak to anyone or volunteer to be arrested if they are from out-of-state. The sites used to b easily found, but they have gone underground lately.

  • junkmail5 Sep 3, 2013

    Hate to break it to folks but simply because one does not agree with the actions of the GA, that decidedly does not make them illegal.
    josephlawrence43

    No, but the fact that every court that has heard a case on similar laws in other states had struck them down as illegal suggests pretty strongly they are, in fact, illegal.

    FYI-Everyone is religious.- cbuckyoung

    FYI- no, they aren't.

    Neither is the government of the US.

  • getrealpeople Sep 3, 2013

    How much $$$ WAS Barber getting from the state for his non profit Community Redevelopment Corporation? Well W RAL? No reports on political appointees and the raises they got under Easley and Purdue. They did it and it was OK for them but not McCrory? Purdue hired Bob "who are You" Etheridge and paid him over 100K. NO protest there.

  • sisu Sep 3, 2013

    I am interested in how these groups get together to protest. Is this a random coalition or are they sponsored.
    tatermommy52
    September 2, 2013 1:46 p.m.

    Top secret... people come to the events because they choose to do so ... they WANT to have their voices heard. I am proud to be among them. Thirteen years ago I voted straight ticket Republican. Nine years ago I voted straight ticket Republican. Five years ago I had a fairly even balance. Thanks to the extremism in the Republican party, especially when it comes to education and environment I voted straight party Democrat in the last election.

    Taking away a straight party option will be no problem for me though, as I pay close attention to elections.

    Too many in the Republican party has become greedy, callous and short-sighted.

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