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Study: Less religious states give less to charity

Posted August 20, 2012

— A new study on the generosity of Americans suggests that states with the least religious residents are also the stingiest about giving money to charity.

The study released Monday by the Chronicle of Philanthropy found that residents in states where religious participation is higher than the rest of the nation, particularly in the South, gave the greatest percentage of their discretionary income to charity.

The Northeast, with lower religious participation, was the least generous to charities, with the six New England states filling the last six slots among the 50 states. Churches are among the organizations counted as charities by the study, and some states in the Northeast rank in the top 10 when religious giving is not counted.

North Carolina ranked 10th on the list, with residents giving 5.9 percent of their discretionary income to charity in 2008.

The study also found that patterns of charitable giving are colored in political reds and blues.

Of the 10 least generous states, nine voted for Democrat Barack Obama for president in the last election. By contrast, of the 10 most generous states, eight voted for Republican John McCain.

But Peter Panepento, the Chronicle's assistant managing editor, said that political breakdown likely speaks to a state's religious makeup, not its prevailing political views. He noted the lowest-ranked Democrat states were also among the least religious, while the top-ranked Republican states were among the more religious.

"I don't know if I could go out and say it's a complete Republican-Democrat difference as much as it is different religious attitudes and culture in these states," he said.

The study was based on Internal Revenue Service records of people who itemized deductions in 2008, the most recent year statistics were available.

By focusing on the percentage given to charity from discretionary income — the money left over after necessities are paid for — the study aimed to remove variables such as the differing costs of living around the country, Panepento said. The data allowed researchers to detail charitable giving down to the ZIP code, he said.

The most generous state was Utah, where residents gave 10.6 percent of their discretionary income to charity. Next were Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee and South Carolina. The least generous was New Hampshire, at 2.5 percent, followed by Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

In Boston, semi-retired carpenter Stephen Cremins said the traditional New England ideal of self-sufficiency might explain the lower giving, particularly during tight times when people have less to spare.

"Charity begins at home. I'm a big believer of that, you know, you have to take care of yourself before you can help others," Cremins said.

The study found that in the Northeast region, including New England, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York, people gave 4.1 percent of their discretionary income to charity. The percentage was 5.2 percent in the Southern states, a region from Texas east to Delaware and Florida, and including most of the so-called Bible Belt.

The Bible mandates a 10 percent annual donation, or tithe, to the church, and the donation is commonly preached as a way to thank God, care for others and show faith in God's provision. But it has a greater emphasis in some faiths.

In Mormon teachings, for instance, Latter Day Saints are required to pay a 10 percent tithe to remain church members in good standing, which helps explain the high giving rate in heavily-Mormon Utah.

"Any LDS member who is faithful does that," said Valerie Mason, 70, of Mesa, Ariz., during an interview in Salt Lake City. "Some struggle with it. Some leave the church because of it. But we believe in the blessing. ... Tithing does bring the blessing of God's promise."

Alan Wolfe, a political science professor at Boston College, said it's wrong to link a state's religious makeup with its generosity. People in less religious states are giving in a different way by being more willing to pay higher taxes so the government can equitably distribute superior benefits, Wolfe said. And the distribution is based purely on need, rather than religious affiliation or other variables, said Wolfe, also head of the college's Boisi Center for Religion and Public Life.

Wolfe said people in less religious states "view the tax money they're paying not as something that's forced upon them, but as a recognition that they belong with everyone else, that they're citizens in the common good. ... I think people here believe that when they pay their taxes, they're being altruistic."

When only secular gifts are counted, New York climbs from No. 18 to No. 2 in giving, and Pennsylvania rises from No. 40 to No. 4.

Among other notable findings of the study:

— People who earn $200,000 per year give a greater percentage to charity when they live in ZIP codes with fewer people who are as wealthy as they are.

— People who earn between $50,000 and $75,000 annually give a higher percentage of their income to charity (7.6 percent) than those who make $100,000 or more (4.2 percent).

____

Associated Press writers Lindsey Anderson and Rodrique Ngowi in Boston and Lynn DeBruin in Salt Lake City, Utah, contributed to this report.

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  • unc70 Aug 20, 2012

    This study is too flawed to conclude anything. Certainly nothing causal.

    States with big time college football have higher rates of charitable giving. Probably supported by this study!

    Remember that donations to all those groups like The Educational Foundation (Rams Club) are considered charitable. Big time college sports and level of church/religious attendance overlap very closely.

    For example, I am a Chapel Hill liberal. My largest charitable donations are to my church and to UNC, with a small part to the Rams Club and the majority towards academic programs. Similar for family who went to State. (BTW Church attendance in liberal Chapel Hill is quite high.)

  • JohnnyMcRonny Aug 20, 2012

    "Well.. since the current administration is proposing to remove the tax benefits associated with donations.. we shall see next year who really has a charitable spirit.. and those that either have a personal interest.. or are cheating on their taxes by claiming donations.." - cuffusion

    To clarify, this administration’s FY 2013 budget intends to “reduce the value of itemized dedications and other tax preferences to 28 percent for families with incomes over $250,000".

  • djofraleigh Aug 20, 2012

    Well, Duh! Go downtown and look at the Atheist Missions and soup kitchens! There's no Atheist Army like there's a salvation army.

    Atheists give, I'm sure, just not in an organized fashion.

    IF surveys went by what people report, then everyone gives a lot more than is given.

  • cuffusion Aug 20, 2012

    Well.. since the current administration is proposing to remove the tax benefits associated with donations.. we shall see next year who really has a charitable spirit.. and those that either have a personal interest.. or are cheating on their taxes by claiming donations..

  • JohnnyMcRonny Aug 20, 2012

    "Funny how so few people understand the fact that most people are more than happy to provide a hand up, and not a hand out. They are very different things." - Damien Thorne

    If I got a tax deduction for everytime people have blamed the poor/ill/elderly/whatever on themselves and told them to suck it up, I'd have off-shore accounts just like some notable individualists.

  • ifcdirector Aug 20, 2012

    That should read "More Liberal States Give MUCH Less To Charity". Of course these skinflints are saving their money for the ACLU, Plannet Infanticide/Parenthood, and other causes to destroy the nation. They are all in for that.

  • arfamr1007 Aug 20, 2012

    Really? Source?
    elcid liked Ike

    source is teh property taxes that are often 10X higher than southern states. look at where minorities tend to live with regard to states. I know the truth hurts sometimes but we'll never fix the problems unless the causes are put on the table.

  • Damien Thorne Aug 20, 2012

    "Nice to see the churches' guilt trips are working.

    Interesting to note that many of the people posting things along the lines of liberals/democrats being least charitable are the very same people who post elsewhere about how poor people should pull themselves up by their bootstraps and not rely on the charity of others. Funny that."----JohnnyMcRonny

    Funny how so few people understand the fact that most people are more than happy to provide a hand up, and not a hand out. They are very different things.

  • Damien Thorne Aug 20, 2012

    "Using the analogy that seems to be so popular with conservatives these days, they're being overtaxed so that the Southern states can receive handouts. Perhaps they would give a higher percentage of their incomes to charity if they weren't already tasked with carrying the deadweight of the states that can't support themselves.

    After all, it's pretty amusing that Mississippi places so highly on charity by a percentage basis. No wonder - it's easy to be charitable when your state is on de facto welfare."-----elcid liked Ike

    Elcid you are completely off the rocker that you have been watching the grass grow in. Must be getting really mushy up there if you think that that tripe has anything to do with people giving money to charity. You need to pack your apologist self up and move up north with them.

  • JohnnyMcRonny Aug 20, 2012

    Nice to see the churches' guilt trips are working.

    Interesting to note that many of the people posting things along the lines of liberals/democrats being least charitable are the very same people who post elsewhere about how poor people should pull themselves up by their bootstraps and not rely on the charity of others. Funny that.

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