@NCCapitol

State lawmakers pass one veto override, reject second one

Posted March 9, 2011

The state Senate voted Wednesday to override a gubernatorial veto, while House Republicans failed in their effort to override a second one.

The Senate voted 31-19 to override Gov. Beverly Perdue's veto last month of Senate Bill 13, the measure that would have raided the cash balances of economic development funds.

Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger said the Senate had to revisit the veto because of information lawmakers received this week about Perdue’s plans to shuffle money around to cover cash flow needs. He said the bill would give her immediate access to cash from the Golden LEAF fund and other pots of money.

Speaker Thom Tillis says House Republicans do not have enough votes to complete the override, but he said he hopes Perdue will “release the Democrats” to vote against her veto and allow Senate Bill 13 to become law.

It’s not uncommon for the state to run into cash-flow issues in March as tax refunds are issued. In most years, the governor manages it by borrowing money from other areas in state government and then paying it back as tax payments arrive in state coffers later in the spring.

This year, Perdue plans to borrow $490 million, including $100 million from Employment Security Commission funds set aside to pay back a federal loan. The first payment isn’t due till September, so Perdue would have time to repay the money.

Republicans say state law does not allow her to use that money, and if someone sues the state over it, taxpayer refunds could be in jeopardy.

Health reform veto stands

Although it was unclear whether House Republicans had enough votes, Tillis pushed Wednesday for the chamber to take on Perdue's veto last week of House Bill 2, which would exempt North Carolina residents from a key requirement to the year-old national health care reform law.

Perdue initially said she wouldn't veto the measure, which takes aim at the so-called "individual mandate," which requires everyone to buy health coverage by 2014 or face financial penalties. The bill also would require the state to join a lawsuit filed by 26 other states against the law.

She changed her mind after Attorney General Roy Cooper said a state challenge of the health reform law could put federal funding of North Carolina's Medicaid program at risk.

The House voted 68-51 for an override, but 72 votes were needed for an override.

46 Comments

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  • atozca Mar 10, 2011

    pthfan22, you are trying to compare apples to oranges.

  • gunny462 Mar 10, 2011

    1000s of companies getting exemptions for the HC and NOW the state of Maine? uhhhuhhh

  • pthfan22 Mar 10, 2011

    If you don't drive, you are forced to buy an ID, if you walk across a border, you will be forced to buy a passport. The goverment spends our money on police, firefighters, roads, schools (I don't have kids, why should I have to pay for schools?) in addition to car insurance, which is forced. Have you ever tried to get around a place that doesn't have good public transportation? Nearly impossible, especially if you've moved somewhere you don't know many people. Yes, some of these things come out of taxes, but its still our money-we still pay for it.

    I still say having this bill in NC is a waste of money and time.

  • atozca Mar 10, 2011

    "And there are MANY things the goverment forces you to buy-from private companies so the claim that the healthcare bill is un-Constitutional is silly." pthfan22

    There is nothing that the government forces you to buy from private companies just because you are a citizen, i.e. the health care insurance requirement. Any thing else, including auto insurance, is a requirement and consequence of a choice one makes, i.e. if I would like the privilege to drive then I must be properly licensed and insured.

  • lovethesouth1 Mar 10, 2011

    You don't see a bunch of Conservatives lining the streets and the capitol building protesting and defacating in the hallways either, even though they disagree with Bev for that veto. Oh that's right. If people in NC protest for 3 weeks and don't go to work, they get FIRED.

  • pthfan22 Mar 10, 2011

    The bill was a waste of money for NC because 10 other states are doing the same thing and this will be settled by the SCOTUS. Its not really a matter of politics, but what is good for the state. And there are MANY things the goverment forces you to buy-from private companies so the claim that the healthcare bill is un-Constitutional is silly.

  • Keepin_it_real_in_NC Mar 10, 2011

    "Wrong. They do have the POWER. Now... whether or not it is legal is the issue.... and what, if anything, can be done is more to the point."

    Yes, you are right. They do have the POWER. They do not have the AUTHORITY to take my hard earned money.

  • HeadPro Mar 10, 2011

    What the Federal government does not have is the power to take my hard earned money and give it to someone else in entitlement programs. Nor do they have the power to force me to buy a private companies produt.
    Keepin_it_real_in_NC

    Wrong. They do have the POWER. Now... whether or not it is legal is the issue.... and what, if anything, can be done is more to the point.

  • whatusay Mar 10, 2011

    notstupid, you are so right....

  • Keepin_it_real_in_NC Mar 10, 2011

    "Sure you will. Just don't drive on my roads or have my police and firemen keep you safe, or depend on my M-1 tank etc. Go ahead and move to Antaractica."

    I am amazed that liberals always use this argument. These items are clearly identified in the Constitution as powers of the Federal government. What the Federal government does not have is the power to take my hard earned money and give it to someone else in entitlement programs. Nor do they have the power to force me to buy a private companies produt.

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