Political News

Governor's School supporters raise money fast

Posted July 27, 2011

— Alumni, parents and others have raised money quickly to keep the North Carolina Governor's School from closing.

Supporters had collected $137,000 by Tuesday for the high school summer-enrichment program. The state Board of Education had challenged fundraisers to come up with $100,000 by August 1 to help make up for more than $800,000 in state budget cuts.

Fundraising organizers said pledges and other anticipated donations are expected to bring the total to $200,000 in the next few days. Supporters want to reduce the amount of tuition that will need to be charged the 600 students chosen to attend next summer.

The program has been offered free to select high-achieving students, providing six weeks of academic and arts courses. More than 31,000 have gone through the program since 1963.

14 Comments

This story is closed for comments.

Oldest First
View all
  • jkhart Jul 28, 2011

    As a resident of Institute, NC, I grew up in a very insular world. And you may find this hard to believe, but being one of the smartest kids in the school was not a sure ticket to acceptance or popularity. Quite the opposite, in fact. Six weeks of Governor's School changed that.

    I'm waiting for the day when a kid who can solve quadratic equations in his head, write outstanding poetry, play Bach like a professional, or comprehend Einstein's Theory of Relativity is given the same accolades and opportunities as someone who can sink an 18-foot jump shot. Governor's School celebrates intelligence and creativity, and for many rural students, it's the only place they will ever go that does.

  • scarlettlaroux Jul 28, 2011

    smissscarlet - July 27, 2011 5:17 p.m. "Governor's School changed my life."

    Miss Scarlet - I have often said the same about Governor's School. Academically gifted, living in rural North Carolina, I didn't realize how big the world was beyond the borders of my 500-citizen town. At GSW, I found my voice and a way to use the natural leadership ability that my teachers recognized -- something I didn't see until the Governor's School experience. Governor's School helped me to think of myself as a part of a community of people who, because of the talents, gifts, and abilities they possessed, were obligated to give back to the community to make our little part of this state, and our country, and the world a better place, even in the face of adversity.

    I made my donation to the alumni group and hope this program continues to thrive and to nurture the young minds that will lead this state in the years to come.

  • jason19 Jul 27, 2011

    "Just why do you think taxpayers should continue to fund educational welfare programs? We dont have children and I just dont feel inclined to want or care about educating and feeding your children. When people make mistakes--even an honest mistake--there are always consequences! Do you realize that by the state allowing an exemption for your children that you are receiving welfare from the state? We not only help you to feed your children but we pay more for educating them than you do!"

    First, please be aware that just because you call something "welfare" doesn't make it so.

    Second, calling education "welfare" is, at best, insulting. Not sure what you hope to gain by needless labels.

    Third, YOU will pay, one way or another, by not having an educated workforce. If you think living in an uneducated society is good for you, then by all means -- move to Afghanistan. Because YOU benefit from an educated society, YOU should help pay for it.

  • westernwake1 Jul 27, 2011

    "Just why do you think taxpayers should continue to fund educational welfare programs? We dont have children and I just dont feel inclined to want or care about educating and feeding your children." - superman

    Would you rather have the children grow up to be uneducated criminals with no future or useful productive adults with jobs that add value to society? If you do not want to fund education programs then I will be sure to direct the gangs of future criminals to pay a visit to your house after reminding them that you did not think educating them was important.

  • smissscarlet Jul 27, 2011

    Governor's School changed my life. I come from a single parent home where we were so poor we got evicted at one time. I knew that education could change my future, so I worked 2 jobs through high school while my mom worked 3 and I made really good grades. I got accepted as an alternate to GSW '94 and I can never express what an invaluable educational experience that was. When I applied to colleges, I was often asked about my time at GSW and I found that it carried a lot of respect. I went on to win a 4 year academic scholarship to college and I try now to give back to the community in a variety of ways. As a successful and grateful adult who benefited from this program, I hope that it survives. Without education, I could have become another statistical loser from a poor single parent home. Thank you North Carolina for this program and here's to doing all I can to pay it forward through my taxes and through personal gifts.

  • superman Jul 27, 2011

    Just why do you think taxpayers should continue to fund educational welfare programs? We dont have children and I just dont feel inclined to want or care about educating and feeding your children. When people make mistakes--even an honest mistake--there are always consequences! Do you realize that by the state allowing an exemption for your children that you are receiving welfare from the state? We not only help you to feed your children but we pay more for educating them than you do!

  • jason19 Jul 27, 2011

    "They don't just 'FIND' money. They have to take it from people."

    By "take it from people," I assume that you mean "raising taxes," in which case you are correct. Yes, things *do* have to be funded -- what a concept.

    And no, I do not agree that this state is "overtaxed." Services cost money, and as a civil society, we should all be willing to make some small sacrifices for the greater good.

  • richonenc Jul 27, 2011

    isn't this the way things are supposed to work? You want something, work for it, pay for it, and enjoy it. Don't expect the government to provide your every little need and desire. Keep on cutting GOP, this is proof that your cuts are well needed.

  • whatelseisnew Jul 27, 2011

    "Glad to see the school get the money it needs to continue. It's just a shame that our dysfunctional legislature couldn't find the money to fund it to begin with."

    They don't just "FIND" money. They have to take it from people. I would much rather have people voluntarily donate money than have it taken from them by the government. This State is Overtaxed and despite that this State is deeply in debt. The legislature needs to keep cutting and they need to get serious about it instead of these tiny trims they did.

  • jason19 Jul 27, 2011

    Glad to see the school get the money it needs to continue. It's just a shame that our dysfunctional legislature couldn't find the money to fund it to begin with.

More...